The Cross and the Lynching Tree

The Cross and the Lynching Tree
Author: James H. Cone
Pages: 202
ISBN: 9781608330010
Available:
Release: 2011
Editor: Orbis Books
Language: un

Explanation of the Book:

A landmark in the conversation about race and religion in America. "They put him to death by hanging him on a tree." Acts 10:39 The cross and the lynching tree are the two most emotionally charged symbols in the history of the African American community. In this powerful new work, theologian James H. Cone explores these symbols and their interconnection in the history and souls of black folk. Both the cross and the lynching tree represent the worst in human beings and at the same time a thirst for life that refuses to let the worst determine our final meaning. While the lynching tree symbolized white power and "black death," the cross symbolizes divine power and "black life" God overcoming the power of sin and death. For African Americans, the image of Jesus, hung on a tree to die, powerfully grounded their faith that God was with them, even in the suffering of the lynching era. In a work that spans social history, theology, and cultural studies, Cone explores the message of the spirituals and the power of the blues; the passion and of Emmet Till and the engaged vision of Martin Luther King, Jr.; he invokes the spirits of Billie Holliday and Langston Hughes, Fannie Lou Hamer and Ida B. Well, and the witness of black artists, writers, preachers, and fighters for justice. And he remembers the victims, especially the 5,000 who perished during the lynching period. Through their witness he contemplates the greatest challenge of any Christian theology to explain how life can be made meaningful in the face of death and injustice.

The Cross and the Lynching Tree

The Cross and the Lynching Tree
Author: James H. Cone
Pages: 202
ISBN: 1626980055
Available:
Release: 2013-01-01
Editor: Unknown
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Examines the symbols of the cross and the lynching tree in African Americans daily life, spiritual life, and history.

The Cross and the Lynching Tree

The Cross and the Lynching Tree
Author: James H. Cone
Pages: 202
ISBN: 1570759375
Available:
Release: 2011
Editor: Unknown
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

The cross and the lynching tree are the two most emotionally charged symbols in the history of the African American community. In this work, Cone explores these symbols and their interconnection in the history and souls of African American folk.

God of the Oppressed

God of the Oppressed
Author: James H. Cone
Pages: 280
ISBN: 9781608330386
Available:
Release: 1997
Editor: Orbis Books
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Black Theology and Black Power

Black Theology and Black Power
Author: Cone, James, H.
Pages: 329
ISBN: 9781608337729
Available:
Release: 2018-12
Editor: Orbis Books
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

"The introduction to this edition by Cornel West was originally published in Dwight N. Hopkins, ed., Black Faith and Public Talk: Critical Essays on James H. Cone's Black Theology & Black Power (Maryknoll, NY: Orbis Books, 1999; reprinted 2007 by Baylor University Press)."

Circling the Elephant

Circling the Elephant
Author: John J. Thatamanil
Pages: 320
ISBN: 9780823288533
Available:
Release: 2020-06-02
Editor: Fordham University Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Christian theologians have for some decades affirmed that they have no monopoly on encounters with God or ultimate reality and that other religions also have access to religious truth and transformation. If that is the case, the time has come for Christians not only to learn about but also from their religious neighbors. Circling the Elephant affirms that the best way to be truly open to the mystery of the infinite is to move away from defensive postures of religious isolationism and self-sufficiency and to move, in vulnerability and openness, toward the mystery of the neighbor. Employing the ancient Indian allegory of the elephant and blind(folded) men, John J. Thatamanil argues for the integration of three often-separated theological projects: theologies of religious diversity (the work of accounting for why there are so many different understandings of the elephant), comparative theology (the venture of walking over to a different side of the elephant), and constructive theology (the endeavor of re-describing the elephant in light of the other two tasks). Circling the Elephant also offers an analysis of why we have fallen short in the past. Interreligious learning has been obstructed by problematic ideas about “religion” and “religions,” Thatamanil argues, while also pointing out the troubling resonances between reified notions of “religion” and “race.” He contests these notions and offers a new theory of the religious that makes interreligious learning both possible and desirable. Christians have much to learn from their religious neighbors, even about such central features of Christian theology as Christ and the Trinity. This book envisions religious diversity as a promise, not a problem, and proposes a new theology of religious diversity that opens the door to robust interreligious learning and Christian transformation through encountering the other.

Martin Malcolm America

Martin   Malcolm   America
Author: James H. Cone
Pages: 358
ISBN: 9780883448243
Available:
Release: 1991
Editor: Orbis Books
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Reexamines the ideology of the two most prominent leaders of the civil rights movement of the 1960s

My Soul Looks Back

My Soul Looks Back
Author: James H. Cone
Pages: 144
ISBN: 9781608330393
Available:
Release: 1986
Editor: Orbis Books
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Cross and Cosmos

Cross and Cosmos
Author: John D. Caputo
Pages: 306
ISBN: 9780253043146
Available:
Release: 2019-07-23
Editor: Indiana University Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

John D. Caputo stretches his project as a radical theologian to new limits in this groundbreaking book. Mapping out his summative theological position, he identifies with Martin Luther to take on notions of the hidden god, the theology of the cross, confessional theology, and natural theology. Caputo also confronts the dark side of the cross with its correlation to lynching and racial and sexual discrimination. Caputo is clear that he is not writing as any kind of orthodox Lutheran but is instead engaging with a radical view of theology, cosmology, and poetics of the cross. Readers will recognize Caputo's signature themes—hermeneutics, deconstruction, weakness, and the call—as well as his unique voice as he writes about moral life and our strivings for joy against contemporary society and politics.

Race

Race
Author: J. Kameron Carter
Pages: 504
ISBN: 9780199882373
Available:
Release: 2008-09-02
Editor: Oxford University Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

In Race: A Theological Account, J. Kameron Carter meditates on the multiple legacies implicated in the production of a racialized world and that still mark how we function in it and think about ourselves. These are the legacies of colonialism and empire, political theories of the state, anthropological theories of the human, and philosophy itself, from the eighteenth-century Enlightenment to the present. Carter's claim is that Christian theology, and the signal transformation it (along with Christianity) underwent, is at the heart of these legacies. In that transformation, Christian anti-Judaism biologized itself so as to racialize itself. As a result, and with the legitimation of Christian theology, Christianity became the cultural property of the West, the religious ground of white supremacy and global hegemony. In short, Christianity became white. The racial imagination is thus a particular kind of theological problem. Not content only to describe this problem, Carter constructs a way forward for Christian theology. Through engagement with figures as disparate in outlook and as varied across the historical landscape as Immanuel Kant, Frederick Douglass, Jarena Lee, Michel Foucault, Cornel West, Albert Raboteau, Charles Long, James Cone, Irenaeus of Lyons, Gregory of Nyssa, and Maximus the Confessor, Carter reorients the whole of Christian theology, bringing it into the twenty-first century. Neither a simple reiteration of Black Theology nor another expression of the new theological orthodoxies, this groundbreaking book will be a major contribution to contemporary Christian theology, with ramifications in other areas of the humanities.

Between Cross and Resurrection

Between Cross and Resurrection
Author: Alan E. Lewis
Pages: 490
ISBN: 0802826784
Available:
Release: 2003-06-20
Editor: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

For much of Christian history the church has given no place to Holy Saturday in its liturgy or worship. Yet the space dividing Calvary and the Garden may be the best place from which to reflect on the meaning of Christ's death and resurrection. This superb work by the late Alan Lewis develops on a grand scale and in great detail a theology of Holy Saturday.The first comprehensive theology of Holy Saturday ever written, Between Cross and Resurrectionshows that at the center of the biblical story and the church's creed lies a three-day narrative. Lewis explores the meaning of Holy Saturday -- the restless day of burial and waiting -- from the perspectives of narrative (hearing the story), doctrine (thinking the story), and ethics (living the story). Along the way he visits as many spiritual themes as possible in order to demonstrate the range of topics that take on fresh meaning when viewed from the vantage point of Holy Saturday.Between Cross and Resurrection is not only incisive and elegantly written, but it is also a uniquely moving work deeply rooted in Christian experience. While writing this book Lewis experienced his own Holy Saturday in suffering from and finally succumbing to cancer. He considered Between Cross and Resurrection to be the culmination of his life's work.

What s Faith Got to Do with It Black Bodies Christian Souls

What s Faith Got to Do with It  Black Bodies   Christian Souls
Author: Douglas, Kelly Brown
Pages: 252
ISBN: 9781608337927
Available:
Release: 2018-09-26
Editor: Orbis Books
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

The Family Tree

The Family Tree
Author: Karen Branan
Pages: 304
ISBN: 9781476717180
Available:
Release: 2016-01-05
Editor: Simon and Schuster
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

In the tradition of 12 Years a Slave and Lee Daniels' The Butler, the provocative true account of the hanging of four black people by a white lynch mob in 1912—written by the great-granddaughter of the Sheriff charged with protecting them. Hamilton County, Georgia, 1912. A white man, the beloved nephew of the county Sheriff, is shot dead on the porch of a black woman. Days after the Sheriff is sworn into office, he oversees the lynching of a pregant woman and three men, all African American. Now, in a personal account like no other, the great-granddaughter of that Sheriff, Karen Branan, digs deep into the past to deliver a shattering historical memoir a century after that gruesome day. In researching her family's history, Branan spent nearly twenty years combing through diaries and letters, visiting the Harris County countryside and courthouse, and conversing with community elders to piece together the events and motives that led up to the lynching. But this is more than a historical narrative; throughout Branan weaves her own personal reflections about coming into touch with difficult, inexplicable feelings surrounding race and family, and ultimately challenging her own self-image as an educated, modern woman who transcends the racism practiced and experienced by the people who raised her. Part of that came with uncovering a startling truth: Branan is not only related to the Sheriff; she is a relative of the four African Americans as well. A story of racism, power, jealousy, and greed, The Family Tree transports you to a small Southern town entrenched in racial tension and bound by family ties. What emerges is a gripping explanation of that awful day in history, but also the crucial issues that follow us into the present.

The Christian Imagination

The Christian Imagination
Author: Willie James Jennings
Pages: 384
ISBN: 9780300163087
Available:
Release: 2010-05-25
Editor: Yale University Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Why has Christianity, a religion premised upon neighborly love, failed in its attempts to heal social divisions? In this ambitious and wide-ranging work, Willie James Jennings delves deep into the late medieval soil in which the modern Christian imagination grew, to reveal how Christianity's highly refined process of socialization has inadvertently created and maintained segregated societies. A probing study of the cultural fragmentation-social, spatial, and racial-that took root in the Western mind, this book shows how Christianity has consistently forged Christian nations rather than encouraging genuine communion between disparate groups and individuals. Weaving together the stories of Zurara, the royal chronicler of Prince Henry, the Jesuit theologian Jose de Acosta, the famed Anglican Bishop John William Colenso, and the former slave writer Olaudah Equiano, Jennings narrates a tale of loss, forgetfulness, and missed opportunities for the transformation of Christian communities. Touching on issues of slavery, geography, Native American history, Jewish-Christian relations, literacy, and translation, he brilliantly exposes how the loss of land and the supersessionist ideas behind the Christian missionary movement are both deeply implicated in the invention of race. Using his bold, creative, and courageous critique to imagine a truly cosmopolitan citizenship that transcends geopolitical, nationalist, ethnic, and racial boundaries, Jennings charts, with great vision, new ways of imagining ourselves, our communities, and the landscapes we inhabit.

Love Expressed

Love  Expressed
Author: Tristan Sherwin
Pages: 252
ISBN: 9781512715859
Available:
Release: 2015-10-23
Editor: WestBow Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

You may be looking at the back of this book, watching as someone else is reading it—a book entitled: Love: Expressed. And you’re thinking, ‘They must have issues.’ So to help them out for a moment: This isn’t another one of those ‘self-help’ manuals. This isn’t a book about romance and sex, or feelings and cuddles. This isn’t a guidebook offering relationship advice, giving tips on how to find ‘love’ and ‘look after’ it. In those senses, this isn’t even a book about love. It’s a book about life—every part of it. About how it should be lived, how it should be explored, how it should be expressed. This is a book about meaning, about life’s trajectories. It’s about God. It’s about you. It’s about them. In that sense, this is all about love. But if I could capture here what I mean by ‘love’ in that sense, I wouldn’t have needed to write a book. “Tristan Sherwin has written a smart and beautiful book showing us that Jesus Christ is the love of God expressed as a human life. This is the life we are called to imitate; this life of love is what we are made for.” —Brian Zahnd; Author of A Farewell To Mars “Refreshing, authentic, inspiring, and yet practical—Tristan is a breath of fresh air.” —Jeff Lucas; Author, Speaker, Broadcaster “Love: Expressed is a work of dirt-under-your-fingers spirituality.” —Jonathan Martin; Author of Prototype

The New Abolition

The New Abolition
Author: Gary Dorrien
Pages: 672
ISBN: 9780300216332
Available:
Release: 2015-09-29
Editor: Yale University Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

The black social gospel emerged from the trauma of Reconstruction to ask what a “new abolition” would require in American society. It became an important tradition of religious thought and resistance, helping to create an alternative public sphere of excluded voices and providing the intellectual underpinnings of the civil rights movement. This tradition has been seriously overlooked, despite its immense legacy. In this groundbreaking work, Gary Dorrien describes the early history of the black social gospel from its nineteenth-century founding to its close association in the twentieth century with W. E. B. Du Bois. He offers a new perspective on modern Christianity and the civil rights era by delineating the tradition of social justice theology and activism that led to Martin Luther King Jr.

Dear Church

Dear Church
Author: Lenny Duncan
Pages: 138
ISBN: 9781506452579
Available:
Release: 2019-07-02
Editor: Fortress Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Lenny Duncan is the unlikeliest of pastors. Formerly incarcerated, he is now a black preacher in the whitest denomination in the United States: the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA). Shifting demographics and shrinking congregations make all the headlines, but Duncan sees something else at work--drawing a direct line between the church's lack of diversity and the church's lack of vitality. The problems the ELCA faces are theological, not sociological. But so are the answers. Part manifesto, part confession, and all love letter, Dear Church offers a bold new vision for the future of Duncan's denomination and the broader mainline Christian community of faith. Dear Church rejects the narrative of church decline and calls everyone--leaders and laity alike--to the front lines of the churchÂs renewal through racial equality and justice. It is time for the church to rise up, dust itself off, and take on forces of this world that act against God: whiteness, misogyny, nationalism, homophobia, and economic injustice. Duncan gives a blueprint for the way forward and urges us to follow in the revolutionary path of Jesus.

At the Altar of Lynching

At the Altar of Lynching
Author: Donald G. Mathews
Pages: 400
ISBN: 9781107182974
Available:
Release: 2017-09-21
Editor: Cambridge University Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Offers a new interpretation of the lynching of Sam Hose through the lens of the religious culture in the evangelical American South.

Is God a White Racist

Is God a White Racist
Author: William Ronald Jones
Pages: 259
ISBN: UOM:39015047058832
Available:
Release: 1998
Editor: Unknown
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

A critique of the black church's treatment of evil and the nature of suffering provides insight into the beliefs and future of liberation theology.

Raising Racists

Raising Racists
Author: Kristina DuRocher
Pages: 248
ISBN: 9780813139845
Available:
Release: 2011-03-30
Editor: University Press of Kentucky
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

White southerners recognized that the perpetuation of segregation required whites of all ages to uphold a strict social order -- especially the young members of the next generation. White children rested at the core of the system of segregation between 1890 and 1939 because their participation was crucial to ensuring the future of white supremacy. Their socialization in the segregated South offers an examination of white supremacy from the inside, showcasing the culture's efforts to preserve itself by teaching its beliefs to the next generation. In Raising Racists: The Socialization of White Children in the Jim Crow South, author Kristina DuRocher reveals how white adults in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries continually reinforced race and gender roles to maintain white supremacy. DuRocher examines the practices, mores, and traditions that trained white children to fear, dehumanize, and disdain their black neighbors. Raising Racists combines an analysis of the remembered experiences of a racist society, how that society influenced children, and, most important, how racial violence and brutality shaped growing up in the early-twentieth-century South.