The Cold War

The Cold War
Author: John Lewis Gaddis
Pages: 333
ISBN: 0143038273
Available:
Release: 2006-12-26
Editor: Penguin
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Evaluates the second half of the twentieth century in light of its first fifty years, chronicling how the world transformed from a dark era of international communism and nuclear weapons to a time of political and economic freedom. Reprint. 75,000 first printing.

The Cold War

The Cold War
Author: Bradley Lightbody
Pages: 142
ISBN: 9780415195263
Available:
Release: 1999
Editor: Psychology Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

The Cold War examines the complex arguments which divided East and West following the end of the Second World War, and analyzes its eight major phases, including: * the emergence of the Cold War * Coexistence and Detente * Glasnost in the late 1980s. Combining factual overview and background discussion of the key issues such as the nuclear threat and who, if anyone, won the Cold War, with analysis of source material, students will find this a must-have in the study of this major historical event.

Cold War a World History

Cold War  a World History
Author: Odd Arne Westad
Pages: 720
ISBN: 0141979917
Available:
Release: 2018-07
Editor: Penguin Classics
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

As Germany and then Japan surrendered in 1945 there was a tremendous hope that a new and much better world could be created from the moral and physical ruins of the conflict. Instead, the combination of the huge power of the USA and USSR and the near-total collapse of most of their rivals created a unique, grim new environment- the Cold War. For over forty years the demands of the Cold War shaped the life of almost all of us. Europe was seemingly split in two indefinitely. This is a book of extraordinary scope and daring. It is conventional to see the first half of the 20th century as a nightmare and the second half as a reprieve. Westad shows that for much of the world the second half was by most measures even worse.

Mao s China and the Cold War

Mao s China and the Cold War
Author: Jian Chen
Pages: 416
ISBN: 9780807898901
Available:
Release: 2010-03-15
Editor: Univ of North Carolina Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

This comprehensive study of China's Cold War experience reveals the crucial role Beijing played in shaping the orientation of the global Cold War and the confrontation between the United States and the Soviet Union. The success of China's Communist revolution in 1949 set the stage, Chen says. The Korean War, the Taiwan Strait crises, and the Vietnam War--all of which involved China as a central actor--represented the only major "hot" conflicts during the Cold War period, making East Asia the main battlefield of the Cold War, while creating conditions to prevent the two superpowers from engaging in a direct military showdown. Beijing's split with Moscow and rapprochement with Washington fundamentally transformed the international balance of power, argues Chen, eventually leading to the end of the Cold War with the collapse of the Soviet Empire and the decline of international communism. Based on sources that include recently declassified Chinese documents, the book offers pathbreaking insights into the course and outcome of the Cold War.

The Encyclopaedia Britannica

The Encyclopaedia Britannica
Author: Hugh Chisholm
Pages: 329
ISBN: BML:37001104321976
Available:
Release: 1910
Editor: Unknown
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

The Columbia Guide to the Cold War

The Columbia Guide to the Cold War
Author: Michael Kort
Pages: 366
ISBN: 9780231107730
Available:
Release: 1998
Editor: Columbia University Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Details the key events and issues in the history of the Cold War, and includes a dictionary of terms, institutions, and people; a condensed chronology; and an annotated resource section.

The United States and the Origins of the Cold War 1941 1947

The United States and the Origins of the Cold War  1941 1947
Author: John Lewis Gaddis
Pages: 396
ISBN: 023112239X
Available:
Release: 2000
Editor: Columbia University Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

John Lewis Gaddis' acclaimed history of U.S. policy toward the Soviet Union during and immediately after World War II is now available with a new preface by the author. This book moves beyond the focus on economic considerations that was central to the work of New Left historians, examining the many other forces -- domestic politics, bureaucratic inertia, quirks of personality, and perceptions of Soviet intentions -- that influenced key decision makers in Washington, and in doing so seeks to analyze these determinants of policy in terms of their full diversity and relative significance.

Southeast Asia and the Cold War

Southeast Asia and the Cold War
Author: Albert Lau
Pages: 293
ISBN: 9780415684507
Available:
Release: 2012
Editor: Routledge
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

The origins and the key defining moments of the Cold War in Southeast Asia have been widely debated. This book focuses on an area that has received less attention, the impact and legacy of the Cold War on the various countries in the region, as well as on the region itself. The book contributes to the historiography of the Cold War in Southeast Asia by examining not only how the conflict shaped the milieu in which national and regional change unfolded but also how the context influenced the course and tenor of the Cold War in the region. It goes on to look at the usefulness or limitations of using the Cold War as an interpretative framework for understanding change in Southeast Asia. Chapters discuss how the Cold War had a varied but notable impact on the countries in Southeast Asia, not only on the mainland countries belonging to what the British Foreign Office called the "upper arc", but also on those situated on its maritime "lower arc". The book is an important contribution to the fields of Asian Studies and International Relations.

The Cold War

The Cold War
Author: Robert Cowley
Pages: 478
ISBN: 9780812967166
Available:
Release: 2006
Editor: Random House Incorporated
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Essays by twenty-five distinguished historians shed new light on the military aspects of the Cold War, with contributions by Dino Bugioni on plans to invade Cuba during the missile crisis, Jeffrey Norman's description of how POWs in North Vietnam survived their ordeal, and other works by Stephen Ambrose, David McCullough, Caleb Carr, Thomas Fleming, and others. Reprint. 12,500 first printing.

The Cold War

The Cold War
Author: Klaus Larres,Ann Lane
Pages: 268
ISBN: 0631207066
Available:
Release: 2001-10-08
Editor: Wiley-Blackwell
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

This collection brings together the most influential and commonly-studied articles on the Cold War. Together with an introduction and concise headnotes, this book provides students with easy access to seminal work and an analytical framework with which to approach their studies.

Stalin and the Cold War in Europe

Stalin and the Cold War in Europe
Author: Gerhard Wettig
Pages: 285
ISBN: 0742555429
Available:
Release: 2008
Editor: Rowman & Littlefield
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

This intriguing book, based on recently accessible Soviet primary sources, is the first to explain the emergence of the Cold War and its development in Stalin's lifetime from the perspective of Soviet policy-making. It pays particular attention to the often-neglected "societal" dimension of Soviet foreign policy as a crucial element of the genesis and development of the Cold War. Gerhard Wettig provides readers with new insights into Stalin's willingness to initiate crisis with the West while still avoiding military conflict.

The Cold War Spy Pocket Manual

The Cold War Spy Pocket Manual
Author: Philip Parker
Pages: 128
ISBN: 9781910860021
Available:
Release: 2015-10-19
Editor: Pool of London Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

"Some twenty-five years after its conclusion, yet with its echoes resonating once more in contemporary East-West relations, the rigors and detail of many aspects of the Cold War are becoming increasingly of interest. Furthermore, at the very same time many of the records of the period are beginning to become accessible for the first time. At the forefront of this unique conflict, that divided the world into two opposing camps for over four decades, were the security services and the agents of these secretive organizations. The Cold War Pocket Manual presents a meticulously compiled selection of recently unclassified documents, field-manuals, briefing directives and intelligence primers that uncover the training and techniques required to function as a spy in the darkest periods of modern history. Material has been researched from the CIA, MI5 and MI6, the KGB, the STASI as well as from the Middle East security services and on into China and the East. As insightful as any drama these documents detail, amongst many other things, the directives that informed nuclear espionage, assassinations, interrogations and the ÔturningÕ of agents and impacted upon the Suez Crisis, the Hungarian Uprising, the ÔCambridge FiveÕ and the most tellingly the Cuban Missile Crisis in 1962. ¥ Full introduction and commentary provided by leading historian and former diplomat Philip Parker. ¥ Complete with a catalogue of, and often instructions for, genuine espionage devices including lock decoders, bugging equipment, a 4.5mm single-shot lipstick gun, microfilm concealing coins and cameras mounted in clothing or pens and shoe-concealed tracking devices. ¥ Presents for the first time the insightful documents, many of which inspired Cold War novelists including John Le CarrŽ, Len Deighton and Ian Fleming, and many of which they would never have seen. "

The Marshall Plan

The Marshall Plan
Author: Benn Steil
Pages: 624
ISBN: 9781501102394
Available:
Release: 2018-02-13
Editor: Simon and Schuster
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Winner of the 2018 American Academy of Diplomacy Douglas Dillon Award Shortlisted for the 2018 Duff Cooper Prize in Literary Nonfiction “[A] brilliant book…by far the best study yet” (Paul Kennedy, The Wall Street Journal) of the gripping history behind the Marshall Plan and its long-lasting influence on our world. In the wake of World War II, with Britain’s empire collapsing and Stalin’s on the rise, US officials under new Secretary of State George C. Marshall set out to reconstruct western Europe as a bulwark against communist authoritarianism. Their massive, costly, and ambitious undertaking would confront Europeans and Americans alike with a vision at odds with their history and self-conceptions. In the process, they would drive the creation of NATO, the European Union, and a Western identity that continue to shape world events. Benn Steil’s “thoroughly researched and well-written account” (USA TODAY) tells the story behind the birth of the Cold War, told with verve, insight, and resonance for today. Focusing on the critical years 1947 to 1949, Benn Steil’s gripping narrative takes us through the seminal episodes marking the collapse of postwar US-Soviet relations—the Prague coup, the Berlin blockade, and the division of Germany. In each case, Stalin’s determination to crush the Marshall Plan and undermine American power in Europe is vividly portrayed. Bringing to bear fascinating new material from American, Russian, German, and other European archives, Steil’s account will forever change how we see the Marshall Plan. “Trenchant and timely…an ambitious, deeply researched narrative that…provides a fresh perspective on the coming Cold War” (The New York Times Book Review), The Marshall Plan is a polished and masterly work of historical narrative. An instant classic of Cold War literature, it “is a gripping, complex, and critically important story that is told with clarity and precision” (The Christian Science Monitor).

Origins of the Cold War

Origins of the Cold War
Author: Melvyn P. Leffler,David S. Painter
Pages: 352
ISBN: 0415341108
Available:
Release: 2005
Editor: Psychology Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

The Cold War dominated the world political arena for forty-five years. Focusing on the international system and on events in all parts of the globe, Melvyn P. Leffler and David S. Painter have brought together a truly international collection of articles that provide a fresh and comprehensive analysis of the origins of the Cold War. Moving beyond earlier controversies, this edited collection focuses on the interaction between geopolitics and threat perception, technology and strategy, ideology and social reconstruction, national economic reform and patterns of international trade, and decolonization and national liberation. The editors also consider how and why the Cold War spread from Europe to Asia, Africa, the Middle East and Latin America and how groups, classes and elites used the Cold War to further their own interests. This second edition includes the newest research from the Communist side of the Cold War and the most recent debates on culture, race and the role of intelligence analysis. Also included is a completely new section dealing with the Cold War crises in Iran, Turkey and Greece and a guide to further reading.

Shadow Cold War

Shadow Cold War
Author: Jeremy Friedman
Pages: 304
ISBN: 9781469623771
Available:
Release: 2015-10-15
Editor: UNC Press Books
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

The conflict between the United States and the Soviet Union during the Cold War has long been understood in a global context, but Jeremy Friedman's Shadow Cold War delves deeper into the era to examine the competition between the Soviet Union and the People's Republic of China for the leadership of the world revolution. When a world of newly independent states emerged from decolonization desperately poor and politically disorganized, Moscow and Beijing turned their focus to attracting these new entities, setting the stage for Sino-Soviet competition. Based on archival research from ten countries, including new materials from Russia and China, many no longer accessible to researchers, this book examines how China sought to mobilize Asia, Africa, and Latin America to seize the revolutionary mantle from the Soviet Union. The Soviet Union adapted to win it back, transforming the nature of socialist revolution in the process. This groundbreaking book is the first to explore the significance of this second Cold War that China and the Soviet Union fought in the shadow of the capitalist-communist clash.

The Cold War

The Cold War
Author: Jeremy Black
Pages: 280
ISBN: 9781474217989
Available:
Release: 2015-10-22
Editor: Bloomsbury Publishing
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Surveys the military and diplomatic history of the long Cold War, from 1917 to the present.

Reconstructing the Cold War

Reconstructing the Cold War
Author: Ted Hopf
Pages: 320
ISBN: 9780199930012
Available:
Release: 2012-04-12
Editor: Oxford University Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

General answers are hard to imagine for the many puzzling questions that are raised by Soviet relations with the world in the early years of the Cold War. Why was Moscow more frightened by the Marshall Plan than the Truman Doctrine? Why would the Soviet Union abandon its closest socialist ally, Yugoslavia, just when the Cold War was getting under way? How could Khrushchev's de-Stalinized domestic and foreign policies at first cause a warming of relations with China, and then lead to the loss of its most important strategic ally? What can explain Stalin's failure to ally with the leaders of the decolonizing world against imperialism and Khrushchev's enthusiastic embrace of these leaders as anti-imperialist at a time of the first detente of the Cold War? It would seem that only idiosyncratic explanations could be offered for these seemingly incoherent policy outcomes. Or, at best, they could be explained by the personalities of Stalin and Khrushchev as leaders. The latter, although plausible, is incorrect. In fact, the most Stalinist of Soviet leaders, the secret police chief and sociopath, Lavrentii Beria, was the most enthusiastic proponent of de-Stalinized foreign and domestic policies after Stalin's death in March 1953. Ted Hopf argues, instead, that it was Soviet identity that explains these anomalies. During Stalin's rule, a discourse of danger prevailed in Soviet society, where any deviations from the idealized version of the New Soviet Man, were understood as threatening the very survival of the Soviet project itself. But the discourse of danger did not go unchallenged. Even under the rule of Stalin, Soviet society understood a socialist Soviet Union as a more secure, diverse, and socially democratic place. This discourse of difference, with its broader conception of what the socialist project meant, and who could contribute to it, was empowered after Stalin's death, first by Beria, then by Malenkov, and then by Khrushchev, and the rest of the post-Stalin Soviet leadership. This discourse of difference allowed for the de-Stalinization of Eastern Europe, with the consequent revolts in Poland and Hungary, a rapprochement with Tito's Yugoslavia, and an initial warming of relations with China. But it also sowed the seeds of the split with China, as the latter moved in the very Stalinist direction at home just rejected by Moscow. And, contrary to conventional and scholarly wisdom, a moderation of authoritarianism at home, a product of the discourse of difference, did not lead to a moderation of Soviet foreign policy abroad. Instead, it led to the opening of an entirely new, and bloody, front in the decolonizing world. In sum, this book argues for paying attention to how societies understand themselves, even in the most repressive of regimes. Who knows, their ideas about national identity, might come to power sometime, as was the case in Iran in 1979, and throughout the Arab world today.

The World the Cold War Made

The World the Cold War Made
Author: James E. Cronin,Cronin James,Prof James E Cronin
Pages: 332
ISBN: 0415908213
Available:
Release: 1996
Editor: Psychology Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

The World the Cold War Made examines the Cold War and its lasting legacy by carefully exploring the creation and structure of the postwar settlement; its successes, failures and adaptations; and the eventual coming apart of the post war order in the 1980s and early 1990s. James Cronin shows how this legacy has allowed some nations and industries to grow but has blocked others' paths to economic development. States whose very identities are threatened and whose positions within the larger community are in flux struggle to find a path to prosperity, while a competitive logic sharply limits the options available to them. At the same time, Cronin states, the end of the Cold War has removed powerful external constraints on the political choices of nations, allowing previously disenfranchised peoples the freedom to chart distinctive paths into the next century that are more responsive to their own histories.--Publisher description.

The Oxford Handbook of the Cold War

The Oxford Handbook of the Cold War
Author: Richard H. Immerman,Petra Goedde
Pages: 660
ISBN: 9780199236961
Available:
Release: 2013-01-31
Editor: Oxford University Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Thirty four essays by a team of leading scholars offering a broad reassessment of the cold war, calling into question orthodox ways of ordering the chronology of the period and presenting new insights into the global dimension of the conflict.

Stalin s Wars

Stalin s Wars
Author: Geoffrey Roberts
Pages: 468
ISBN: 0300112041
Available:
Release: 2006-01-01
Editor: Yale University Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

This breakthrough book provides a detailed reconstruction of Stalin’s leadership from the outbreak of the Second World War in 1939 to his death in 1953. Making use of a wealth of new material from Russian archives, Geoffrey Roberts challenges a long list of standard perceptions of Stalin: his qualities as a leader; his relationships with his own generals and with other great world leaders; his foreign policy; and his role in instigating the Cold War. While frankly exploring the full extent of Stalin’s brutalities and their impact on the Soviet people, Roberts also uncovers evidence leading to the stunning conclusion that Stalin was both the greatest military leader of the twentieth century and a remarkable politician who sought to avoid the Cold War and establish a long-term detente with the capitalist world. By means of an integrated military, political, and diplomatic narrative, the author draws a sustained and compelling personal portrait of the Soviet leader. The resulting picture is fascinating and contradictory, and it will inevitably change the way we understand Stalin and his place in history. Roberts depicts a despot who helped save the world for democracy, a personal charmer who disciplined mercilessly, a utopian ideologue who could be a practical realist, and a warlord who undertook the role of architect of post-war peace.