Sam Patch the Famous Jumper

Sam Patch  the Famous Jumper
Author: Paul E. Johnson
Pages: 224
ISBN: 1429931957
Available:
Release: 2004-06-16
Editor: Hill and Wang
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

The true history of a legendary American folk hero In the 1820s, a fellow named Sam Patch grew up in Pawtucket, Rhode Island, working there (when he wasn't drinking) as a mill hand for one of America's new textile companies. Sam made a name for himself one day by jumping seventy feet into the tumultuous waters below Pawtucket Falls. When in 1827 he repeated the stunt in Paterson, New Jersey, another mill town, an even larger audience gathered to cheer on the daredevil they would call the "Jersey Jumper." Inevitably, he went to Niagara Falls, where in 1829 he jumped not once but twice in front of thousands who had paid for a good view. The distinguished social historian Paul E. Johnson gives this deceptively simple story all its deserved richness, revealing in its characters and social settings a virtual microcosm of Jacksonian America. He also relates the real jumper to the mythic Sam Patch who turned up as a daring moral hero in the works of Hawthorne and Melville, in London plays and pantomimes, and in the spotlight with Davy Crockett—a Sam Patch who became the namesake of Andrew Jackson's favorite horse. In his shrewd and powerful analysis, Johnson casts new light on aspects of American society that we may have overlooked or underestimated. This is innovative American history at its best.

The Kingdom of Matthias

The Kingdom of Matthias
Author: Paul E. Johnson,Sean Wilentz
Pages: 240
ISBN: 0195098358
Available:
Release: 1995-08-03
Editor: Oxford University Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

This book brings to life the spiritual and sexual tensions of mid-19th-century America through the sensational and unforgettable story of the cult of Matthias.

A Shopkeeper s Millennium

A Shopkeeper s Millennium
Author: Paul E. Johnson
Pages: 240
ISBN: 9781466806160
Available:
Release: 2004-06-21
Editor: Hill and Wang
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

A quarter-century after its first publication, A Shopkeeper's Millennium remains a landmark work--brilliant both as a new interpretation of the intimate connections among politics, economy, and religion during the Second Great Awakening, and as a surprising portrait of a rapidly growing frontier city. The religious revival that transformed America in the 1820s, making it the most militantly Protestant nation on earth and spawning reform movements dedicated to temperance and to the abolition of slavery, had an especially powerful effect in Rochester, New York. Paul E. Johnson explores the reasons for the revival's spectacular success there, suggesting important links between its moral accounting and the city's new industrial world. In a new preface, he reassesses his evidence and his conclusions in this major work.

Escaping Salem

Escaping Salem
Author: Richard Godbeer
Pages: 177
ISBN: 9780195161298
Available:
Release: 2005
Editor: Oxford University Press, USA
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Describes the witch hunt that took place in Stamford, Connecticut, in 1692, detailing the story of Kate Branch, a seventeen-year-old afflicted by strange visions and given to wails of pain and fright, who accused several women of bewitching her.

The Wonderful Leaps of Sam Patch

The Wonderful Leaps of Sam Patch
Author: McLoughlin Brothers
Pages: 24
ISBN: 9781429081665
Available:
Release: 2012-01-18
Editor: Applewood Books
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Presents a fictionalized, rhyming version of the life and feats of the famous jumping daredevil.

Baseball in Blue and Gray

Baseball in Blue and Gray
Author: George B. Kirsch
Pages: 168
ISBN: 9781400849253
Available:
Release: 2013-10-24
Editor: Princeton University Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

During the Civil War, Americans from homefront to battlefront played baseball as never before. While soldiers slaughtered each other over the country's fate, players and fans struggled over the form of the national pastime. George Kirsch gives us a color commentary of the growth and transformation of baseball during the Civil War. He shows that the game was a vital part of the lives of many a soldier and civilian--and that baseball's popularity had everything to do with surging American nationalism. By 1860, baseball was poised to emerge as the American sport. Clubs in northeastern and a few southern cities played various forms of the game. Newspapers published statistics, and governing bodies set rules. But the Civil War years proved crucial in securing the game's place in the American heart. Soldiers with bats in their rucksacks spread baseball to training camps, war prisons, and even front lines. As nationalist fervor heightened, baseball became patriotic. Fans honored it with the title of national pastime. War metaphors were commonplace in sports reporting, and charity games were scheduled. Decades later, Union general Abner Doubleday would be credited (wrongly) with baseball's invention. The Civil War period also saw key developments in the sport itself, including the spread of the New York-style of play, the advent of revised pitching rules, and the growth of commercialism. Kirsch recounts vivid stories of great players and describes soldiers playing ball to relieve boredom. He introduces entrepreneurs who preached the gospel of baseball, boosted female attendance, and found new ways to make money. We witness bitterly contested championships that enthralled whole cities. We watch African Americans embracing baseball despite official exclusion. And we see legends spring from the pens of early sportswriters. Rich with anecdotes and surprising facts, this narrative of baseball's coming-of-age reveals the remarkable extent to which America's national pastime is bound up with the country's defining event.

Untidy Origins

Untidy Origins
Author: Lori D. Ginzberg
Pages: 240
ISBN: 9780807876367
Available:
Release: 2006-03-08
Editor: Univ of North Carolina Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

On a summer day in 1846--two years before the Seneca Falls convention that launched the movement for woman's rights in the United States--six women in rural upstate New York sat down to write a petition to their state's constitutional convention, demanding "equal, and civil and political rights with men." Refusing to invoke the traditional language of deference, motherhood, or Christianity as they made their claim, the women even declined to defend their position, asserting that "a self evident truth is sufficiently plain without argument." Who were these women, Lori Ginzberg asks, and how might their story change the collective memory of the struggle for woman's rights? Very few clues remain about the petitioners, but Ginzberg pieces together information from census records, deeds, wills, and newspapers to explore why, at a time when the notion of women as full citizens was declared unthinkable and considered too dangerous to discuss, six ordinary women embraced it as common sense. By weaving their radical local action into the broader narrative of antebellum intellectual life and political identity, Ginzberg brings new light to the story of woman's rights and of some women's sense of themselves as full members of the nation.

Heir to the Empire City

Heir to the Empire City
Author: Edward P. Kohn,P Kohn
Pages: 272
ISBN: 9780465069750
Available:
Release: 2013-12-10
Editor: Basic Books
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

"Theodore Roosevelt is best remembered as America's prototypical "cowboy" president--an outdoorsy, rough-riding figure who was as versatile with a six-shooter as he was with a pen, and who derived his political wisdom from a life spent in rugged and inhospitable environs: the Dakota Badlands, the battlefields of Cuba, and the African savannah. Roosevelt himself did little to dispel his outdoorsy aura, and for decades historians have bought into this mythology. Yet while such experiences certainly contributed to Roosevelt's progressive politics and abiding love of the natural world, they've played an excessive role in defining his biography. In fact, Roosevelt was a native Manhattanite who came of age in the upper crust of New York society, and the reformist, anti-corruption policies for which he would come to be known were firmly rooted in the realities of life in the 19th-century city. A riveting portrait of a man and a city on the brink of greatness, Heir to the Empire City reveals that Roosevelt was a New Yorker through and through, and that his true education took place not on the ranges of the West but on the mean streets of New York"--

Streets Railroads and the Great Strike of 1877

Streets  Railroads  and the Great Strike of 1877
Author: David O. Stowell
Pages: 181
ISBN: 0226776697
Available:
Release: 1999-06
Editor: University of Chicago Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Compares the experiences of the New York communities of Albany, Buffalo, and Syracuse during the strikes of 1877, and argues that the crowds were seeking control over urban space, rather than higher wages or workplace control.

The Alcoholic Republic

The Alcoholic Republic
Author: W.J. Rorabaugh
Pages: 320
ISBN: 0199766312
Available:
Release: 1981-09-17
Editor: Oxford University Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Rorabaugh has written a well thought out and intriguing social history of Americas great alcoholic binge that occurred between 1790 and 1830, what he terms a key formative period in our history....A pioneering work that illuminates a part of our heritage that can no longer be neglected in future studies of Americas social fabric. A bold and frequently illuminating attempt to investigate the relationship of a single social custom to the central features of our historical experience....A book which always asks interesting questions and provides many provocative answers.

Accounting for Slavery

Accounting for Slavery
Author: Caitlin Rosenthal
Pages: 295
ISBN: 9780674241657
Available:
Release: 2019-09-15
Editor: Harvard University Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Caitlin Rosenthal explores quantitative management practices on West Indian and Southern plantations, showing how planter-capitalists built sophisticated organizations and used complex accounting tools. By demonstrating that business innovation can be a byproduct of bondage Rosenthal further erodes the false boundary between capitalism and slavery.

The Early American Republic 1789 1829

The Early American Republic  1789 1829
Author: Paul E. Johnson
Pages: 194
ISBN: UOM:39015064737276
Available:
Release: 2007
Editor: Oxford University Press, USA
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Johnson composes a single volume text which adeptly synthesizes the literature on the political, social, and cultural historyof the United States from the 1790's through the 1830's. At the forefront is the history of national politics and the national state, accompanied by important themes in social history and portraying overall the evolution citizenship.

The Chinese Must Go

The Chinese Must Go
Author: Beth Lew-Williams
Pages: 360
ISBN: 9780674976016
Available:
Release: 2018-02-26
Editor: Harvard University Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Beth Lew-Williams shows how American immigration policies incited violence against Chinese workers, and how that violence provoked new exclusionary policies. Locating the origins of the modern American "alien" in this violent era, she makes clear that the present resurgence of xenophobia builds mightily upon past fears of the "heathen Chinaman."

Flush Times and Fever Dreams

Flush Times and Fever Dreams
Author: Joshua D. Rothman
Pages: 440
ISBN: 9780820344669
Available:
Release: 2012-11-01
Editor: University of Georgia Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

In 1834 Virgil Stewart rode from western Tennessee to a territory known as the “Arkansas morass” in pursuit of John Murrell, a thief accused of stealing two slaves. Stewart’s adventure led to a sensational trial and a wildly popular published account that would ultimately help trigger widespread violence during the summer of 1835, when five men accused of being professional gamblers were hanged in Vicksburg, nearly a score of others implicated with a gang of supposed slave thieves were executed in plantation districts, and even those who tried to stop the bloodshed found themselves targeted as dangerous and subversive. Using Stewart’s story as his point of entry, Joshua D. Rothman details why these events, which engulfed much of central and western Mississippi, came to pass. He also explains how the events revealed the fears, insecurities, and anxieties underpinning the cotton boom that made Mississippi the most seductive and exciting frontier in the Age of Jackson. As investors, settlers, slaves, brigands, and fortune-hunters converged in what was then America’s Southwest, they created a tumultuous landscape that promised boundless opportunity and spectacular wealth. Predicated on ruthless competition, unsustainable debt, brutal exploitation, and speculative financial practices that looked a lot like gambling, this landscape also produced such profound disillusionment and conflict that it contained the seeds of its own potential destruction. Rothman sheds light on the intertwining of slavery and capitalism in the period leading up to the Panic of 1837, highlighting the deeply American impulses underpinning the evolution of the slave South and the dizzying yet unstable frenzy wrought by economic flush times. It is a story with lessons for our own day. Published in association with the Library Company of Philadelphia’s Program in African American History. A Sarah Mills Hodge Fund Publication.

Elizabeth Cady Stanton

Elizabeth Cady Stanton
Author: Lori D. Ginzberg
Pages: 272
ISBN: 1429978953
Available:
Release: 2010-08-31
Editor: Hill and Wang
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Elizabeth Cady Stanton was a brilliant activist-intellectual. That nearly all of her ideas—that women are entitled to seek an education, to own property, to get a divorce, and to vote—are now commonplace is in large part because she worked tirelessly to extend the nation's promise of radical individualism to women. In this subtly crafted biography, the historian Lori D. Ginzberg narrates the life of a woman of great charm, enormous appetite, and extraordinary intellectual gifts who turned the limitations placed on women like herself into a universal philosophy of equal rights. Few could match Stanton's self-confidence; loving an argument, she rarely wavered in her assumption that she had won. But she was no secular saint, and her positions were not always on the side of the broadest possible conception of justice and social change. Elitism runs through Stanton's life and thought, defined most often by class, frequently by race, and always by intellect. Even her closest friends found her absolutism both thrilling and exasperating, for Stanton could be an excellent ally and a bothersome menace, sometimes simultaneously. At once critical and admiring, Ginzberg captures Stanton's ambiguous place in the world of reformers and intellectuals, describes how she changed the world, and suggests that Stanton left a mixed legacy that continues to haunt American feminism.

Defiance of the Patriots

Defiance of the Patriots
Author: Benjamin L. Carp
Pages: 336
ISBN: 9780300168457
Available:
Release: 2010-10-26
Editor: Yale University Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

This thrilling book tells the full story of the an iconic episode in American history, the Boston Tea Party-exploding myths, exploring the unique city life of eighteenth-century Boston, and setting this audacious prelude to the American Revolution in a global context for the first time. Bringing vividly to life the diverse array of people and places that the Tea Party brought together-from Chinese tea-pickers to English businessmen, Native American tribes, sugar plantation slaves, and Boston's ladies of leisure-Benjamin L. Carp illuminates how a determined group of New Englanders shook the foundations of the British Empire, and what this has meant for Americans since. As he reveals many little-known historical facts and considers the Tea Party's uncertain legacy, he presents a compelling and expansive history of an iconic event in America's tempestuous past.

Moral Minorities and the Making of American Democracy

Moral Minorities and the Making of American Democracy
Author: Kyle G. Volk
Pages: 291
ISBN: 9780199371914
Available:
Release: 2014
Editor: Oxford University Press, USA
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

This work unearths the origins of popular minority-rights politics in American history. Focusing on controversies spurred by grassroots moral reform in the early 19th century, it shows how a motley array of self-understood minorities reshaped American democracy as they battled laws regulating Sabbath observance, alcohol, and interracial contact.

Capital Moves

Capital Moves
Author: Jefferson Cowie
Pages: 279
ISBN: 9781565846593
Available:
Release: 2001
Editor: The New Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

The highly acclaimed account of one renowned company's labor struggles in its rise to global power. Globalization is the lead story of the new century, but its roots reach back nearly one hundred years, to major corporations' quest for stable, inexpensive, and pliant sources of labor. Before the largest companies moved beyond national boundaries, they crossed state lines, abandoning the industrial centers of the Eastern Seaboard for impoverished rural communities in the Midwest and South. In their wake they left the decaying urban landscapes and unemployment rates that became hallmarks of late-twentieth-century America. This is the story that Jefferson Cowie, in "a stunningly important work of historical imagination and rediscovery" (Nelson Lichtenstein), tells through the lens of a single American corporation, RCA. Capital Moves takes us through the interconnected histories of Camden, New Jersey; Bloomington, Indiana; Memphis, Tennessee; and Juarez, Mexicofour cities radically transformed by America's leading manufacturer of records and radio sets. In a sweeping narrative of economic upheaval and class conflict, Cowie weaves together the rich detail of local history with the nationaland ultimately internationalstory of economic and social change. 22 black-and-white photographs.

The Arts of Deception

The Arts of Deception
Author: James W. Cook,Assistant Professor of History and American Culture James W Cook
Pages: 314
ISBN: UOM:39076002184807
Available:
Release: 2001
Editor: Unknown
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

In The Arts of Deception, James Cook explores the distinctly modern mode of trickery designed to puzzle the eye and challenge the brain. Upsetting the normally strict boundaries of value, race, class, and truth, the spectacles offer a revealing look at the tastes, concerns, and prejudices of America's very first mass audiences.

Hidden History of the Finger Lakes

Hidden History of the Finger Lakes
Author: Patti Unvericht
Pages: 160
ISBN: 9781467138192
Available:
Release: 2018-07-16
Editor: Arcadia Publishing
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

New York's Finger Lakes region is filled with compelling characters, tragic disasters and fascinating mysteries. Famed daredevil Sam Patch, known as the "Yankee Leaper," thrilled audiences at Niagara Falls but took his last jump into the Genesee River with his pet black bear, plummeting to his death. The first ever Memorial Day was celebrated in Waterloo in 1866 and inspired a nation to adopt the holiday. Seneca Lake claims its fair share of ships, including the Onondaga, which was blown up with dynamite as part of a spectacle to commemorate the sinking of the USS Maine. Author Patti Unvericht reveals the forgotten history of the Finger Lakes region.