Reading the American Past Volume I To 1877

Reading the American Past  Volume I  To 1877
Author: Michael P. Johnson
Pages: 329
ISBN: 9780312564131
Available:
Release: 2012-01-05
Editor: Macmillan
Language: un

Explanation of the Book:

"Organized chapter by chapter to parallel The American promise: a history of the United States in all its editions"--v. 1, p. iii.

Understanding the American Promise Volume 1

Understanding the American Promise  Volume 1
Author: James L. Roark,Michael P. Johnson,Patricia Cline Cohen,Sarah Stage,Susan M. Hartmann
Pages: 560
ISBN: 1319042317
Available:
Release: 2016-12-09
Editor: Bedford/St. Martin's
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Understanding the American Promise, Third Edition, features a brief, question-driven narrative that models for students the inquiry-based methods used by historians and features an innovative active learning pedagogy designed to foster greater comprehension of the reading. This book includes a full-color map and art program, new primary documents, and comprehensive supplement options including LaunchPad. It is also enhanced by LearningCurve, our easy-to-assign adaptive learning system that will ensure students come to class prepared.

Reading the American Past Volume II From 1865

Reading the American Past  Volume II  From 1865
Author: Michael P. Johnson
Pages: 368
ISBN: 031240901X
Available:
Release: 2004-10-08
Editor: Bedford/St. Martin's
Language: un

Explanation of the Book:

This two-volume primary-source collection provides a wide array of voices from the nation’s past while emphasizing the important social, political, and economic themes of U.S. history courses. Thirty-one new documents (one per chapter) allow for a multiplicity of perspectives on environmental, western, ethnic, and gender history and more global coverage. Edited by one of the authors of The American Promise and designed to complement the textbook, Reading the American Past provides a broad selection of over 150 documents and editorial apparatus to aid students’ understanding of the sources.

Reading the Past

Reading the Past
Author: Ian Hodder,Scott Hutson
Pages: 293
ISBN: 0521528844
Available:
Release: 2003-12-04
Editor: Cambridge University Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

In 'Reading the Past', the authors argue that archaeologists must bring to bear a variety of perspectives in the task of constructing meaning from the past. This third edition includes new material on feminist archaeology, historical approaches such as cultural history, and theories of discourse and signs.

These Truths A History of the United States

These Truths  A History of the United States
Author: Jill Lepore
Pages: 960
ISBN: 9780393635256
Available:
Release: 2018-09-18
Editor: W. W. Norton & Company
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

New York Times Bestseller In the most ambitious one-volume American history in decades, award-winning historian and New Yorker writer Jill Lepore offers a magisterial account of the origins and rise of a divided nation, an urgently needed reckoning with the beauty and tragedy of American history. Written in elegiac prose, Lepore’s groundbreaking investigation places truth itself—a devotion to facts, proof, and evidence—at the center of the nation’s history. The American experiment rests on three ideas—"these truths," Jefferson called them—political equality, natural rights, and the sovereignty of the people. And it rests, too, on a fearless dedication to inquiry, Lepore argues, because self-government depends on it. But has the nation, and democracy itself, delivered on that promise? These Truths tells this uniquely American story, beginning in 1492, asking whether the course of events over more than five centuries has proven the nation’s truths, or belied them. To answer that question, Lepore traces the intertwined histories of American politics, law, journalism, and technology, from the colonial town meeting to the nineteenth-century party machine, from talk radio to twenty-first-century Internet polls, from Magna Carta to the Patriot Act, from the printing press to Facebook News. Along the way, Lepore’s sovereign chronicle is filled with arresting sketches of both well-known and lesser-known Americans, from a parade of presidents and a rogues’ gallery of political mischief makers to the intrepid leaders of protest movements, including Frederick Douglass, the famed abolitionist orator; William Jennings Bryan, the three-time presidential candidate and ultimately tragic populist; Pauli Murray, the visionary civil rights strategist; and Phyllis Schlafly, the uncredited architect of modern conservatism. Americans are descended from slaves and slave owners, from conquerors and the conquered, from immigrants and from people who have fought to end immigration. "A nation born in contradiction will fight forever over the meaning of its history," Lepore writes, but engaging in that struggle by studying the past is part of the work of citizenship. "The past is an inheritance, a gift and a burden," These Truths observes. "It can’t be shirked. There’s nothing for it but to get to know it."

Reading The American Past

Reading The American Past
Author: Michael P. Johnson
Pages: 290
ISBN: UCSC:32106017068559
Available:
Release: 2001-08
Editor: Bedford/st Martins
Language: un

Explanation of the Book:

This two-volume primary-source collection provides a broad range of voices and perspectives from our nation's past, while emphasizing the important social, political, and economic themes of most U.S. history survey courses. Edited by one of the authors of The American Promise and designed to complement the textbook, Reading the American Past offers a rich selection of over 125 documents and editorial apparatus to aid students' understanding of the sources.

Reading the Past Writing the Future

Reading the Past  Writing the Future
Author: Erika Lindemann
Pages: 505
ISBN: 0814138764
Available:
Release: 2010
Editor: National Council of Teachers
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Reading the Romance

Reading the Romance
Author: Janice A. Radway
Pages: 288
ISBN: 9780807898857
Available:
Release: 2009-11-18
Editor: Univ of North Carolina Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Originally published in 1984, Reading the Romance challenges popular (and often demeaning) myths about why romantic fiction, one of publishing's most lucrative categories, captivates millions of women readers. Among those who have disparaged romance reading are feminists, literary critics, and theorists of mass culture. They claim that romances enforce the woman reader's dependence on men and acceptance of the repressive ideology purveyed by popular culture. Radway questions such claims, arguing that critical attention "must shift from the text itself, taken in isolation, to the complex social event of reading." She examines that event, from the complicated business of publishing and distribution to the individual reader's engagement with the text. Radway's provocative approach combines reader-response criticism with anthropology and feminist psychology. Asking readers themselves to explore their reading motives, habits, and rewards, she conducted interviews in a midwestern town with forty-two romance readers whom she met through Dorothy Evans, a chain bookstore employee who has earned a reputation as an expert on romantic fiction. Evans defends her customers' choice of entertainment; reading romances, she tells Radway, is no more harmful than watching sports on television. "We read books so we won't cry" is the poignant explanation one woman offers for her reading habit. Indeed, Radway found that while the women she studied devote themselves to nurturing their families, these wives and mothers receive insufficient devotion or nurturance in return. In romances the women find not only escape from the demanding and often tiresome routines of their lives but also a hero who supplies the tenderness and admiring attention that they have learned not to expect. The heroines admired by Radway's group defy the expected stereotypes; they are strong, independent, and intelligent. That such characters often find themselves to be victims of male aggression and almost always resign themselves to accepting conventional roles in life has less to do, Radway argues, with the women readers' fantasies and choices than with their need to deal with a fear of masculine dominance. These romance readers resent not only the limited choices in their own lives but the patronizing atitude that men especially express toward their reading tastes. In fact, women read romances both to protest and to escape temporarily the narrowly defined role prescribed for them by a patriarchal culture. Paradoxically, the books that they read make conventional roles for women seem desirable. It is this complex relationship between culture, text, and woman reader that Radway urges feminists to address. Romance readers, she argues, should be encouraged to deliver their protests in the arena of actual social relations rather than to act them out in the solitude of the imagination. In a new introduction, Janice Radway places the book within the context of current scholarship and offers both an explanation and critique of the study's limitations.

Reading the Past Across Space and Time

Reading the Past Across Space and Time
Author: Brenda Deen Schildgen,Ralph Hexter
Pages: 392
ISBN: 9781137558855
Available:
Release: 2017-03-02
Editor: Springer
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Featuring leading scholars in their fields, this book examines receptions of ancient and early modern literary works from around the world (China, Japan, Ancient Maya, Ancient Mediterranean, Ancient India, Ancient Mesopotamia) that have circulated globally across time and space (from East to West, North to South, South to West). Beginning with the premise of an enduring and revered cultural past, the essays go on to show how the circulation of literature through translation and other forms of reception in fact long predates modern global society; the idea of national literary canons have existed just over a hundred years and emerged with the idea of national educational curricula. Highlighting the relationship of culture and politics in which canons are created, translated, promulgated, and preserved, this book argues that such nationally-defined curricula were challenged by critics and writers in the wake of the Second World War.

The Great Gatsby with Audio Text

The Great Gatsby  with Audio   Text
Author: F. Scott Fitzgerald
Pages: 500
ISBN:
Available:
Release: 2021-03-13
Editor: East West Studio
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

The Great Gatsby is a 1925 novel written by American author F. Scott Fitzgerald that follows a cast of characters living in the fictional town of West and East Egg on prosperous Long Island in the summer of 1922. The story primarily concerns the young and mysterious millionaire Jay Gatsby and his quixotic passion and obsession for the beautiful former debutante Daisy Buchanan. The Great Gatsby explores themes of decadence, idealism, resistance to change, social upheaval, and excess, creating a portrait of the Jazz Age or the Roaring Twenties that has been described as a cautionary tale regarding the American Dream. Set on the prosperous Long Island of 1922, The Great Gatsby provides a critical social history of America during the Roaring Twenties within its fictional narrative. That era, known for profound economic prosperity, the development of jazz music flapper culture, new technologies in communication (motion pictures, broadcast radio, recorded music) forging a genuine mass culture; and bootlegging, along with other criminal activity, is plausibly depicted in Fitzgerald's novel. Fitzgerald uses many of these societal developments of the 1920s that were to build Gatsby's stories from many of the simple details like automobiles to broader themes like Fitzgerald's discreet allusions to the organized crime culture which was the source of Gatsby's fortune. Fitzgerald depicts the garish society of the Roaring Twenties by placing the book's plotline within the historical context of the era.

Life of a Klansman

Life of a Klansman
Author: Edward Ball
Pages: 416
ISBN: 9780374720261
Available:
Release: 2020-08-04
Editor: Farrar, Straus and Giroux
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

"A haunting tapestry of interwoven stories that inform us not just about our past but about the resentment-bred demons that are all too present in our society today . . . The interconnected strands of race and history give Ball’s entrancing stories a Faulknerian resonance." —Walter Isaacson, The New York Times Book Review A 2020 NPR staff pick | One of The New York Times' thirteen books to watch for in August | One of The Washington Post's ten books to read in August | A Literary Hub best book of the summer| One of Kirkus Reviews' sixteen best books to read in August The life and times of a militant white supremacist, written by one of his offspring, National Book Award–winner Edward Ball Life of a Klansman tells the story of a warrior in the Ku Klux Klan, a carpenter in Louisiana who took up the cause of fanatical racism during the years after the Civil War. Edward Ball, a descendant of the Klansman, paints a portrait of his family’s anti-black militant that is part history, part memoir rich in personal detail. Sifting through family lore about “our Klansman” as well as public and private records, Ball reconstructs the story of his great-great grandfather, Constant Lecorgne. A white French Creole, father of five, and working class ship carpenter, Lecorgne had a career in white terror of notable and bloody completeness: massacres, night riding, masked marches, street rampages—all part of a tireless effort that he and other Klansmen made to restore white power when it was threatened by the emancipation of four million enslaved African Americans. To offer a non-white view of the Ku-klux, Ball seeks out descendants of African Americans who were once victimized by “our Klansman” and his comrades, and shares their stories. For whites, to have a Klansman in the family tree is no rare thing: Demographic estimates suggest that fifty percent of whites in the United States have at least one ancestor who belonged to the Ku Klux Klan at some point in its history. That is, one-half of white Americans could write a Klan family memoir, if they wished. In an era when racist ideology and violence are again loose in the public square, Life of a Klansman offers a personal origin story of white supremacy. Ball’s family memoir traces the vines that have grown from militant roots in the Old South into the bitter fruit of the present, when whiteness is again a cause that can veer into hate and domestic terror.

Reading the American Past To 1877

Reading the American Past  To 1877
Author: Michael P. Johnson
Pages: 268
ISBN: 0312391323
Available:
Release: 2001-07-01
Editor: Bedford/st Martins
Language: un

Explanation of the Book:

This two-volume primary-source collection provides a broad range of voices and perspectives from our nation's past, while emphasizing the important social, political, and economic themes of most U.S. history survey courses. Edited by one of the authors of The American Promise and designed to complement the textbook, Reading the American Past offers a rich selection of over 125 documents and editorial apparatus to aid students' understanding of the sources.

Reading the American Past

Reading the American Past
Author: Anonim
Pages: 329
ISBN: OCLC:1036837545
Available:
Release: 1998
Editor: Unknown
Language: un

Explanation of the Book:

The American Promise Volume 2

The American Promise  Volume 2
Author: James L. Roark,Michael P. Johnson,Patricia Cline Cohen,Sarah Stage,Susan M. Hartmann
Pages: 624
ISBN: 1319062091
Available:
Release: 2016-12-09
Editor: Bedford/St. Martin's
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

The American Promise has long been a course favorite. Students value The American Promise for its readability, clear chronology, and lively voices of ordinary Americans, while instructors rely upon the rich content, the many documents and features, and the overall support for teaching their class their way. The American Promise provides superior formats for every use—the print book allows for a seamless reading experience while LaunchPad provides the right space for active learning assignments and dynamic course management tools that measure and analyze student progress. LaunchPad comes with a wealth of primary sources and special critical thinking activities to help students progress toward achieving learning outcomes; LearningCurve, the adaptive learning tool that students love to use to test their understanding of the text and instructors love to assign to prepare students for class; and a suite of instructor resources from videos to test banks that make teaching simpler and more effective.

American Sonnets for My Past and Future Assassin

American Sonnets for My Past and Future Assassin
Author: Terrance Hayes
Pages: 112
ISBN: 9780525504962
Available:
Release: 2018-06-19
Editor: Penguin
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Finalist for the National Book Award and the National Book Critics Circle Award in Poetry One of the New York Times Critics' Top Books of 2018 A powerful, timely, dazzling collection of sonnets from one of America's most acclaimed poets, Terrance Hayes, the National Book Award-winning author of Lighthead "Sonnets that reckon with Donald Trump's America." -The New York Times In seventy poems bearing the same title, Terrance Hayes explores the meanings of American, of assassin, and of love in the sonnet form. Written during the first two hundred days of the Trump presidency, these poems are haunted by the country's past and future eras and errors, its dreams and nightmares. Inventive, compassionate, hilarious, melancholy, and bewildered--the wonders of this new collection are irreducible and stunning.

Reading the American Past Selected Historical Documents Volume 1 To 1877

Reading the American Past  Selected Historical Documents  Volume 1  To 1877
Author: Michael P. Johnson
Pages: 320
ISBN: 131921200X
Available:
Release: 2019-09-06
Editor: Bedford Books
Language: un

Explanation of the Book:

"With five carefully selected documents per chapter, this popular two-volume primary source reader presents a wide range of documents representing political, social, and cultural history in an accessible way. Expertly edited by Michael Johnson, co-author of The American Promise, the readings can be used to spark discussion in any classroom and will fit into any syllabus."--Publisher website.

Re reading the past

Re reading the past
Author: J.R. Martin,Ruth Wodak
Pages: 277
ISBN: 9789027296023
Available:
Release: 2003-11-17
Editor: John Benjamins Publishing
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Re/reading the Past is concerned with the discourses of history, from the complementary perspectives of Critical Discourse Analysis (CDA) and Systemic Functional Linguistics (SFL). The papers in the book stress the discursive construction of the past, focussing on the different social narratives which compete for official acknowledgement. Issues of collective and cultural memory are addressed, reflecting the "linguistic turn" in the Social Sciences. The book covers a range of discourses, interpreting texts from popular culture to academic discourse including the construction and evaluation of past events in a variety of places around the world. It is especially timely in its focus on the construction of time and value in a post-colonial world where history discourses are central to on-going processes of reconciliation, debates on war crimes, and the issues of amnesty and restitution. As such the book fills a significant gap in interdisciplinary debates as well as in register and genre analysis, and will be of general interest to historians, political scientists and discourse analysts as well as students and teachers of ESP (English for Specific Purposes) and EAP (English for Academic Purposes).

Reading the American Past

Reading the American Past
Author: Michael P. Johnson
Pages: 329
ISBN: OCLC:852798114
Available:
Release: 2021
Editor: Unknown
Language: un

Explanation of the Book:

Lies My Teacher Told Me

Lies My Teacher Told Me
Author: James W. Loewen
Pages: 444
ISBN: 9780743296281
Available:
Release: 2007-10-16
Editor: Simon and Schuster
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Criticizes the way history is presented in current textbooks, and suggests a fresh and more accurate approach to teaching American history.

This America The Case for the Nation

This America  The Case for the Nation
Author: Jill Lepore
Pages: 128
ISBN: 9781631496424
Available:
Release: 2019-05-28
Editor: Liveright Publishing
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

From the acclaimed historian and New Yorker writer comes this urgent manifesto on the dilemma of nationalism and the erosion of liberalism in the twenty-first century. At a time of much despair over the future of liberal democracy, Jill Lepore makes a stirring case for the nation in This America, a follow-up to her much-celebrated history of the United States, These Truths. With dangerous forms of nationalism on the rise, Lepore, a Harvard historian and New Yorker staff writer, repudiates nationalism here by explaining its long history—and the history of the idea of the nation itself—while calling for a “new Americanism”: a generous patriotism that requires an honest reckoning with America’s past. Lepore begins her argument with a primer on the origins of nations, explaining how liberalism, the nation-state, and liberal nationalism, developed together. Illiberal nationalism, however, emerged in the United States after the Civil War—resulting in the failure of Reconstruction, the rise of Jim Crow, and the restriction of immigration. Much of American history, Lepore argues, has been a battle between these two forms of nationalism, liberal and illiberal, all the way down to the nation’s latest, bitter struggles over immigration. Defending liberalism, as This America demonstrates, requires making the case for the nation. But American historians largely abandoned that defense in the 1960s when they stopped writing national history. By the 1980s they’d stopped studying the nation-state altogether and embraced globalism instead. “When serious historians abandon the study of the nation,” Lepore tellingly writes, “nationalism doesn’t die. Instead, it eats liberalism.” But liberalism is still in there, Lepore affirms, and This America is an attempt to pull it out. “In a world made up of nations, there is no more powerful way to fight the forces of prejudice, intolerance, and injustice than by a dedication to equality, citizenship, and equal rights, as guaranteed by a nation of laws.” A manifesto for a better nation, and a call for a “new Americanism,” This America reclaims the nation’s future by reclaiming its past.