Writing My Wrongs

Writing My Wrongs
Author: Shaka Senghor
Pages: 288
ISBN: 9781101907306
Available:
Release: 2016-03-08
Editor: Convergent Books
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • An unforgettable memoir of redemption and second chances amidst America's mass incarceration epidemic, from a member of Oprah's SuperSoul 100 Shaka Senghor was raised in a middle class neighborhood on Detroit’s east side during the height of the 1980s crack epidemic. An honor roll student and a natural leader, he dreamed of becoming a doctor—but at age 11, his parents' marriage began to unravel, and beatings from his mother worsened, which sent him on a downward spiral. He ran away from home, turned to drug dealing to survive, and ended up in prison for murder at the age of 19, full of anger and despair. Writing My Wrongs is the story of what came next. During his nineteen-year incarceration, seven of which were spent in solitary confinement, Senghor discovered literature, meditation, self-examination, and the kindness of others—tools he used to confront the demons of his past, forgive the people who hurt him, and begin atoning for the wrongs he had committed. Upon his release at age thirty-eight, Senghor became an activist and mentor to young men and women facing circumstances like his. His work in the community and the courage to share his story led him to fellowships at the MIT Media Lab and the Kellogg Foundation and invitations to speak at events like TED and the Aspen Ideas Festival. In equal turns, Writing My Wrongs is a page-turning portrait of life in the shadow of poverty, violence, and fear; an unforgettable story of redemption and a compelling witness to our country’s need for rethinking its approach to crime, prison, and the men and women sent there.

Writing My Wrongs

Writing My Wrongs
Author: Shaka Senghor
Pages: 268
ISBN: 9781101907290
Available:
Release: 2016
Editor: Unknown
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

"During his nineteen-year incarceration [for murder], seven of which were spent in solitary confinement, Senghor discovered literature, meditation, self-examination, and the kindness of others--tools he used to confront the demons of his past, forgive the people who hurt him, and begin atoning for the wrongs he had committed. Upon his release at age thirty-eight, Senghor became an activist and mentor to young men and women facing circumstances like his"--Dust jacket flap.

Writing My Wrongs

Writing My Wrongs
Author: Shaka Senghor
Pages: 268
ISBN: 9781101907313
Available:
Release: 2016
Editor: Unknown
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

In life, it's not how you start that matters. It's how you finish. In the 1980s Shaka Senghor was an honor roll student and dreamed of becoming a doctor. In 1991 he was sent to prison for second-degree murder. During his 19-year incarceration, seven of which were spent in solitary confinement, Senghor discovered literature, meditation, and self-examination. He used these tools to confront the demons of his past, forgive the people who hurt him, and begin atoning for the wrongs he had committed. At his release at age 38 he became an activist and mentor to young men and women facing circumstances like his.

Writing the Wrongs

Writing the Wrongs
Author: Al Johnson
Pages: 44
ISBN: 9781411675056
Available:
Release: 2006-02
Editor: Lulu.com
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

A book of poetry about my journey of recovery from child abuse. One section is titled Writing the Wrongs. Flip the book over to read the other section, titled Righting the Wrongs. For a free electronic version of this book, click here. If you prefer to order from amazon.com, click here.

Writing My Wrongs

Writing My Wrongs
Author: Angela C. Green
Pages: 230
ISBN: 1546422773
Available:
Release: 2017-05-07
Editor: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

This book is me. It's about the me that had to deal with the cards dealt to me. I had no choice in who I was born to or where I was placed as a baby. It was God's divine choice. I am an epic display of God's GRACE. I have suffered many hard days but not in vain. Many that will read this may have some clue but the rest have no idea. I covered my pains very well. I smiled through every wound and every oozing cut. I didn't create the mess in my life. However, I did make the mess worse. By the time I wanted to clean it up, I didn't know where to start. It wasn't my mess, but it is my house. I could no longer blame anyone for the mess I've lived in for the last 30 years of my life. I had to take responsibility and own up to my part as well as the position I played. Look, we all have been dealt a hand in life. How we play this hand determines our life's successes and defeats. I am not perfect, but from this journey I've learned. I learned how to own up to it all. I've accepted every failure and disappointment...It's time to heal and move on. I'm not perfect but I am pleasing to God. And so, I'm surviving.

Letters to the Sons of Society

Letters to the Sons of Society
Author: Shaka Senghor
Pages: 240
ISBN: 9780593238028
Available:
Release: 2022-01-18
Editor: Convergent Books
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

The New York Times bestselling author of Writing My Wrongs invites men everywhere on a journey of honesty and healing through this book of moving letters to his sons—one whom he is raising and the other whose childhood took place during Senghor's nineteen-year incarceration. Shaka Senghor has lived the life of two fathers. With his first son, Jay, born shortly after Senghor was incarcerated for second-degree murder, he experienced the regret of his own mistakes and the disconnection caused by a society that sees Black lives as disposable. With his second, Sekou, born after Senghor's release, he has experienced healing, transformation, intimacy, and the possibilities of a world where men and boys can openly show one another affection, support, and love. In this collection of beautifully written letters to Jay and Sekou, Senghor traces his journey as a Black man in America and unpacks the toxic and misguided messages about masculinity, mental health, love, and success that boys learn from an early age. He issues a passionate call to all fathers and sons—fathers who don't know how to show their sons love, sons who are navigating a fatherless world, boys who have been forced to grow up before their time—to cultivate positive relationships with other men, seek healing, tend to mental health, grow from pain, and rewrite the story that has been told about them. Letters to the Sons of Society is a soulful examination of the bond between father and sons, and a touchstone for anyone seeking a kinder, more just world.

I m Writing My Wrongs I m Not Righting My Wrongs

I m Writing My Wrongs  I m Not Righting My Wrongs
Author: Inita Callaway
Pages: 140
ISBN: 1722678372
Available:
Release: 2018-10-05
Editor: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

An extension of the author's blog, The B - Logs, this didactic book of short stories is set out to teach life lessons and conceivably prevent you from making the same mistakes, or at best, be equipped to deal with what may come your way. From the beginning to the completion of this book, the reader will be inserted in the life of the author with the intention to evoke empathy. The stories will take you on a range of emotions that will consciously stir up encouragement, strength, wisdom, love, heartbreak, pain, fear and most importantly FAITH. The book is broken down by themes to help navigate through and digest the wisdom and lessons effectively. Though your wrongs may not be identical, the theme is, you can take solace in the fact that you too can overcome any situation. The power of God is indescribable. These are a collection of short stories that may very well save your life.

Write His Wrongs

Write His Wrongs
Author: J. Wesley
Pages: 329
ISBN: 0997115904
Available:
Release: 2016-03-12
Editor: Unknown
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

From Heartbreak to Love Notes combines lyrical expression with poetry to capture modern dating by using pieces to tell a story of young man knowing little about relationships but is destined to learn. It's broken into three sections and chronicles his thought process when enamored, losing interest, cheating, searching, heartbroken and healed.

The Love Prison Made and Unmade

The Love Prison Made and Unmade
Author: Ebony Roberts
Pages: 304
ISBN: 9780062876669
Available:
Release: 2019-07-09
Editor: HarperCollins
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

With echoes of Just Mercy and An American Marriage, a remarkable memoir of a woman who falls in love with an incarcerated man—a poignant story of hope and disappointment that lays bare the toll prison takes not only on those behind bars, but on their families and relationships. Ebony’s parents were high school sweethearts and married young. By the time Ebony was born, the marriage was disintegrating. As a little girl she witnessed her parents’ brutal verbal and physical fights, fueled by her father’s alcoholism. Then her father tried to kill her mother. Those experiences drastically affected the way Ebony viewed love and set the pattern for her future romantic relationships. Despite being an educated and strong-minded woman determined not to repeat the mistakes of her parents—she would have a fairytale love—Ebony found herself drawn to bad-boys: men who cheated; men who verbally abused her; men who disappointed her. Fed up, she swore to wait for the partner God chose for her. Then she met Shaka Senghor. Though she felt an intense spiritual connection, Ebony struggled with the idea that this man behind bars for murder could be the good love God had for her. Through letters and visits, she and Shaka fell deeply in love. Once Shaka came home, Ebony thought the worst was behind them. But Shaka’s release was the beginning of the end. The Love Prison Made and Unmade is heartfelt. It reveals powerful lessons about love, sacrifice, courage, and forgiveness; of living your highest principles and learning not to judge someone by their worst acts. Ultimately, it is a stark reminder of the emotional cost of American justice on human lives—the partners, wives, children, and friends—beyond the prison walls.

Righting Canada s Wrongs Residential Schools

Righting Canada s Wrongs  Residential Schools
Author: Melanie Florence
Pages: 128
ISBN: 9781459408661
Available:
Release: 2015-12-15
Editor: James Lorimer & Company
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Canada's residential school system for aboriginal young people is now recognized as a grievous historic wrong committed against First Nations, Metis, and Inuit peoples. This book documents this subject in a format that will give all young people access to this painful part of Canadian history. In 1857, the Gradual Civilization Act was passed by the Legislature of the Province of Canada with the aim of assimilating First Nations people. In 1879, Prime Minister Sir John A. Macdonald commissioned the "Report on Industrial Schools for Indians and Half-Breeds." This report led to native residential schools across Canada. First Nations and Inuit children aged seven to fifteen years old were taken from their families, sometimes by force, and sent to residential schools where they were made to abandon their culture. They were dressed in uniforms, their hair was cut, they were forbidden to speak their native language, and they were often subjected to physical and psychological abuse. The schools were run by the churches and funded by the federal government. About 150,000 aboriginal children went to 130 residential schools across Canada. The last federally funded residential school closed in 1996 in Saskatchewan. The horrors that many children endured at residential schools did not go away. It took decades for people to speak out, but with the support of the Assembly of First Nations and Inuit organizations, former residential school students took the federal government and the churches to court. Their cases led to the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement, the largest class-action settlement in Canadian history. In 2008, Prime Minister Harper formally apologized to former native residential school students for the atrocities they suffered and the role the government played in setting up the school system. The agreement included the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, which has since worked to document this experience and toward reconciliation. Through historical photographs, documents, and first-person narratives from First Nations, Inuit, and Metis people who survived residential schools, this book offers an account of the injustice of this period in Canadian history. It documents how this official racism was confronted and finally acknowledged.

Writing the Wrongs

Writing the Wrongs
Author: Elizabeth Faue
Pages: 249
ISBN: 0801484650
Available:
Release: 2004-12
Editor: Cornell University Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Eva McDonald Valesh was one of the Progressive Era's foremost labor publicists. Challenging the narrow confines placed on women, Valesh became a successful investigative journalist, organizer, and public speaker for labor reform.Valesh was a compatriot of the labor leaders of her day and the "right-hand man" of Samuel Gompers, president of the American Federation of Labor. Events she covered during her colorful, unconventional reporting career included the Populist revolt, the Cuban crisis of the 1890s, and the 1910 Shirtwaistmakers' uprising. She was described as bright, even "comet-like," by her admirers, but her enemies saw her as "a pest" who took "all the benefit that her sex controls when in argument with a man."Elizabeth Faue examines the pivotal events that transformed this outspoken daughter of a working-class Scots-Irish family into a national political figure, interweaving the study of one woman's fascinating life with insightful analysis of the changing character of American labor reform during the period from 1880 to 1920. In her journey through the worlds of labor, journalism, and politics, Faue lays bare the underside of social reform and reveals how front-line workers in labor's political culture--reporters, investigators, and lecturers--provoked and informed American society by writing about social wrongs. Compelling, insightful, and at times humorous, Writing the Wrongs is a window on the Progressive Era, on social history and the new journalism, and on women's lives and the meanings of class and gender.

Prison Life Writing

Prison Life Writing
Author: Simon Rolston
Pages: 329
ISBN: 9781771125185
Available:
Release: 2021-06-30
Editor: Wilfrid Laurier Univ. Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Prison Life Writing is the first full-length study of one of the most controversial genres in American literature. By exploring the complicated relationship between life writing and institutional power, this book reveals the overlooked aesthetic innovations of incarcerated people and the surprising literary roots of the U.S. prison system. Simon Rolston observes that the autobiographical work of incarcerated people is based on a conversion narrative, a story arc that underpins the concept of prison rehabilitation and that sometimes serves the interests of the prison system, rather than those on the inside. Yet many imprisoned people rework the conversion narrative the way they repurpose other objects in prison. Like a radio motor retooled into a tattoo gun, the conversion narrative has been redefined by some authors for subversive purposes, including questioning the ostensible emancipatory role of prison writing, critiquing white supremacy, and broadly reimagining autobiographical discourse. An interdisciplinary work that brings life writing scholarship into conversation with prison studies and law and literature studies, Prison Life Writing theorizes how life writing works in prison, explains literature’s complicated entanglements with institutional power, and demonstrates the political and aesthetic innovations of one of America’s most fascinating literary genres.

A Knock at Midnight

A Knock at Midnight
Author: Brittany K. Barnett
Pages: 352
ISBN: 9781984825797
Available:
Release: 2020-09-08
Editor: Crown
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

LOS ANGELES TIMES BOOK PRIZE FINALIST • NAACP IMAGE AWARD NOMINEE • A “powerful and devastating” (The Washington Post) call to free those buried alive by America’s legal system, and an inspiring true story about unwavering belief in humanity—from a gifted young lawyer and important new voice in the movement to transform the system. “An essential book for our time . . . Brittany K. Barnett is a star.”—Van Jones, CEO of REFORM Alliance, CNN Host, and New York Times bestselling author Brittany K. Barnett was only a law student when she came across the case that would change her life forever—that of Sharanda Jones, single mother, business owner, and, like Brittany, Black daughter of the rural South. A victim of America’s devastating war on drugs, Sharanda had been torn away from her young daughter and was serving a life sentence without parole—for a first-time drug offense. In Sharanda, Brittany saw haunting echoes of her own life, as the daughter of a formerly incarcerated mother. As she studied this case, a system came into focus in which widespread racial injustice forms the core of America’s addiction to incarceration. Moved by Sharanda’s plight, Brittany set to work to gain her freedom. This had never been the plan. Bright and ambitious, Brittany was a successful accountant on her way to a high-powered future in corporate law. But Sharanda’s case opened the door to a harrowing journey through the criminal justice system. By day she moved billion-dollar deals, and by night she worked pro bono to free clients in near hopeless legal battles. Ultimately, her path transformed her understanding of injustice in the courts, of genius languishing behind bars, and the very definition of freedom itself. Brittany’s riveting memoir is at once a coming-of-age story and a powerful evocation of what it takes to bring hope and justice to a system built to resist them both. NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY KIRKUS REVIEWS

Prison Writing in 20th century America

Prison Writing in 20th century America
Author: Howard Bruce Franklin
Pages: 368
ISBN: 0140273050
Available:
Release: 1998
Editor: Penguin
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Gathers over sixty selections written while incarcerated by such authors as Malcolm X, Assata Shakur, Jim Etheridge, Edward Bunker, Nathan Heard, Jim Tully, and Kim Wozencraft

Writing Wrongs

Writing Wrongs
Author: W. Davies King,Wallace Shawn
Pages: 242
ISBN: 1566395178
Available:
Release: 1997
Editor: Temple University Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Writing Wrongs: The Work of Wallace Shawn is a close and personal look into the life and literary work of the man whom Joseph Papp called "a dangerous writer." As the son of the late William Shawn, renowned editor of the New Yorker, Wallace Shawn was born into privilege and trained to thoroughly liberal values, but his plays relentlessly question the liberal faith in individualism and common decency. W. D. King's incisive critiques of the plays and inquiry into the life and times of their author develop a portrait of Shawn as a major figure in contemporary theater.

Uprooted

Uprooted
Author: Grace Olmstead
Pages: 272
ISBN: 9780593084038
Available:
Release: 2021-03-16
Editor: Penguin
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

"A superior exploration of the consequences of the hollowing out of our agricultural heartlands."—Kirkus Reviews In the tradition of Wendell Berry, a young writer wrestles with what we owe the places we’ve left behind. In the tiny farm town of Emmett, Idaho, there are two kinds of people: those who leave and those who stay. Those who leave go in search of greener pastures, better jobs, and college. Those who stay are left to contend with thinning communities, punishing government farm policy, and environmental decay. Grace Olmstead, now a journalist in Washington, DC, is one who left, and in Uprooted, she examines the heartbreaking consequences of uprooting—for Emmett, and for the greater heartland America. Part memoir, part journalistic investigation, Uprooted wrestles with the questions of what we owe the places we come from and what we are willing to sacrifice for profit and progress. As part of her own quest to decide whether or not to return to her roots, Olmstead revisits the stories of those who, like her great-grandparents and grandparents, made Emmett a strong community and her childhood idyllic. She looks at the stark realities of farming life today, identifying the government policies and big agriculture practices that make it almost impossible for such towns to survive. And she explores the ranks of Emmett’s newcomers and what growth means for the area’s farming tradition. Avoiding both sentimental devotion to the past and blind faith in progress, Olmstead uncovers ways modern life attacks all of our roots, both metaphorical and literal. She brings readers face to face with the damage and brain drain left in the wake of our pursuit of self-improvement, economic opportunity, and so-called growth. Ultimately, she comes to an uneasy conclusion for herself: one can cultivate habits and practices that promote rootedness wherever one may be, but: some things, once lost, cannot be recovered.

Lethal Letters

Lethal Letters
Author: Ellery Adams
Pages: 304
ISBN: 9780698137295
Available:
Release: 2014-11-04
Editor: Penguin
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Restaurant owner and aspiring novelist Olivia Limoges is busy planning a delicious menu for Oyster Bay’s biggest soiree of the spring. But she’ll need to serve some justice as well after one resident gets eighty-sixed… Everyone’s got their hands full in Oyster Bay, North Carolina. Aside from two upcoming weddings, there’s also the historical society’s annual fund-raiser: the Secret Garden Party and Candlelit Ball. Adding to the excitement, Olivia witnesses the discovery of a time capsule in the foundation of a local church. The historical society president hopes to display its contents at their party, but when the items are finally revealed to the public, Olivia notices one of them has vanished. After a frightening find beneath the pier—the body of Ruthie Holcomb—Olivia is certain there’s a connection between the young woman’s death and the missing piece from the time capsule. With the help of her fellow Bayside Book Writers, Olivia sets out to uncover some clues and ensure a killer has no reason to celebrate…

To Right the Wrongs

To Right the Wrongs
Author: Sheryl Scarborough
Pages: 320
ISBN: 9781466885493
Available:
Release: 2018-02-27
Editor: Tor Teen
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Sheryl Scarborough continues the adventures of teen amateur sleuth and aspiring forensic scientist Erin Blake in To Right the Wrongs, the sequel to To Catch a Killer. Barely three weeks after catching the killer of Erin’s mother and their biology teacher, Erin and her crew are back, up to their elbows in forensics projects. But this time it’s with the full approval of their parents. With Uncle Victor at the helm, Erin and her best friends, Spam and Lysa, are prepping a new classroom for CSI summer camp, where they will serve as camp counselors. Meanwhile, Erin's super-hot new boyfriend, Journey, is graduating, just in time for him to take a position as Victor’s intern in the new CSI lab on campus. Journey and Victor are going to take another look at the evidence in the murder trial that sent Journey’s father to prison. The girls are under strict orders not to meddle with the murder case, but that's easier said than done... At the Publisher's request, this title is being sold without Digital Rights Management Software (DRM) applied.

For the People

For the People
Author: Larry Krasner
Pages: 336
ISBN: 9780593132937
Available:
Release: 2021-04-20
Editor: One World
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Philadelphia’s progressive district attorney offers an inspiring vision of how people can take back power to reform criminal justice, based on lessons from a life’s work as an advocate for the accused. “Larry Krasner is at the forefront of a movement to disrupt a system. This is a story that needs to be read by millions.”—Bryan Stevenson, author of Just Mercy Larry Krasner spent thirty years learning about America’s carceral system as a civil rights and criminal defense lawyer in Philadelphia, working to get some kind of justice for his clients in a broken system, before deciding that the way to truly transform the system was to get inside of it. So he launched an unlikely campaign to become the district attorney of Philadelphia, a city known for its long line of notorious “tough on crime” DAs who had turned Philly into a city with one of the highest rates of incarceration in the country. Despite long odds and derisive opposition from the police union and other forces of the status quo, Krasner laid out a simple case for radical reform and won the November general election by a margin of nearly 50 percent. For the People is not just a story about Krasner’s remarkable early life as a defense lawyer and his powerful, grassroots campaign; it’s also a larger exploration of how power and injustice conspired to create a carceral state unprecedented in the world. Readers follow Krasner’s lifelong journey through the streets and courtrooms and election precincts of one American city all the way up to his swearing-in ceremony to see how our system of injustice was built—and how we might dismantle it. In the tradition of powerful critiques of the criminal justice system, from Bryan Stevenson’s Just Mercy to Michelle Alexander’s The New Jim Crow, For the People makes the powerful case that transforming criminal justice is the most important civil rights movement of our time and can only be done if we’re willing to fight for the power to make a change.

The Myth of Sanity

The Myth of Sanity
Author: Martha Stout
Pages: 272
ISBN: 9781101161630
Available:
Release: 2002-02-26
Editor: Penguin
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Why does a gifted psychiatrist suddenly begin to torment his own beloved wife? How can a ninety-pound woman carry a massive air conditioner to the second floor of her home, install it in a window unassisted, and then not remember how it got there? Why would a brilliant feminist law student ask her fiancé to treat her like a helpless little girl? How can an ordinary, violence-fearing businessman once have been a gun-packing vigilante prowling the crime districts for a fight? A startling new study in human consciousness, The Myth of Sanity is a landmark book about forgotten trauma, dissociated mental states, and multiple personality in everyday life. In its groundbreaking analysis of childhood trauma and dissociation and their far-reaching implications in adult life, it reveals that moderate dissociation is a normal mental reaction to pain and that even the most extreme dissociative reaction-multiple personality-is more common than we think. Through astonishing stories of people whose lives have been shattered by trauma and then remade, The Myth of Sanity shows us how to recognize these altered mental states in friends and family, even in ourselves.