Women in Colonial Latin America 1526 to 1806

Women in Colonial Latin America  1526 to 1806
Author: Anonim
Pages: 320
ISBN: 9781624667527
Available:
Release: 2018-09-15
Editor: Hackett Publishing
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

"This outstanding collection makes available for the first time a remarkable range of primary sources that will enrich courses on women as well as Latin American history more broadly. Within these pages are captivating stories of enslaved African and indigenous women who protest abuse; of women who defend themselves from charges of witchcraft, cross-dressing, and infanticide; of women who travel throughout the empire or are left behind by the men in their lives; and of women’s strategies for making a living in a world of cross-cultural exchanges. Jaffary and Mangan's excellent Introduction and annotations provide context and guide readers to think critically about crucial issues related to the intersections of gender with conquest, religion, work, family, and the law." —Sarah Chambers, University of Minnesota

The Women of Colonial Latin America

The Women of Colonial Latin America
Author: Susan Migden Socolow
Pages: 272
ISBN: 9780521196659
Available:
Release: 2015-02-16
Editor: Cambridge University Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

A highly readable survey of women's experiences in Latin America from the late fifteenth to the early nineteenth centuries.

Sexuality and Marriage in Colonial Latin America

Sexuality and Marriage in Colonial Latin America
Author: Asunci¢n Lavrin
Pages: 349
ISBN: 080327940X
Available:
Release: 1989-01-01
Editor: U of Nebraska Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

"Few decisions in life should be more personal than the choice of a spouse or lover. Yet, throughout history, this intimate experience has been subjected to painstaking social and religious regulation in the form of legislation and restraining social mores." With that statement, Asunción Lavrin begins her introduction to this collection of original essays, the first in English to explore sexuality and marriage in colonial Latin America. The nine contributors, including historians and anthropologists, examine various aspects of the male-female relationship and the mechanisms for controlling it developed by church and state after the European conquest of Mexico and Central and South America. Seldom has so much light been shed on the sexual behavior of the men and women who lived there from the sixteenth to the eighteenth century. These chapters examine the variety of sexual expression in different periods and among persons of different social and economic status, the relations of the sexes as proscribed by church and state and the various forms of resistance to their constraints, the couple's own view of the bond that united them and of their social obligations in producing a family, and the dissolution of that bond. Topics infrequently explored in Latin American history but discussed her include premarital relations, illegitimacy, consensual unions, sexual witchcraft, spouse abuse, and divorce. Lavrin's opening survey of the forms of sexual relationships most discussed in ecclesiastical sources serves as a point of departure for the chapters that follow. The contributors are Serge Grunzinski, Ann Twinam, Kathy Waldron, Ruth Behar, Susan Socolow, Richard Boyer, Thomas Calvo, and María Beatriz Nizza da Silva. Asunción Lavrin is a professor of history at Arizona State University at Tempe. Her 1995 book, Women, Feminism, and Social Change in Argentina, Chile, and Uruguay, 1890-1940, won the Arthur P. Whitaker Prize from the Middle Atlantic Council on Latin American Studies.

The Routledge History of Death since 1800

The Routledge History of Death since 1800
Author: Peter N. Stearns
Pages: 552
ISBN: 9780429639845
Available:
Release: 2020-10-13
Editor: Routledge
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

The Routledge History of Death Since 1800 looks at how death has been treated and dealt with in modern history – the history of the past 250 years – in a global context, through a mix of definite, often quantifiable changes and a complex, qualitative assessment of the subject. The book is divided into three parts, with the first considering major trends in death history and identifying widespread patterns of change and continuity in the material and cultural features of death since 1800. The second part turns to specifically regional experiences, and the third offers more specialized chapters on key topics in the modern history of death. Historical findings and debates feed directly into a current and prospective assessment of death, as many societies transition into patterns of ageing that will further alter the death experience and challenge modern reactions. Thus, a final chapter probes this topic, by way of introducing the links between historical experience and current trajectories, ensuring that the book gives the reader a framework for assessing the ongoing process, as well as an understanding of the past. Global in focus and linking death to a variety of major developments in modern global history, the volume is ideal for all those interested in the multifaceted history of how death is dealt with in different societies over time and who want access to the rich and growing historiography on the subject.

The French Revolution as a Moment of Respatialization

The French Revolution as a Moment of Respatialization
Author: Matthias Middell,Megan Maruschke
Pages: 262
ISBN: 9783110620290
Available:
Release: 2019-09-23
Editor: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

The French Revolution has primarily been understood as a national event that also had a lasting impact in Europe and in the Atlantic world. Recently, historiography has increasingly emphasized how France’s overseas colonies also influenced the contours of the French Revolution. This volume examines the effects of both dimensions on the reorganization of spatial formats and spatial orders in France and in other societies. It departs from the assumption that revolutions shatter not only the political and economic old regime order at home but, in an increasingly interdependent world, also result in processes of respatialization. The French Revolution, therefore, is analysed as a key event in a global history that seeks to account for the shifting spatial organization of societies on a transregional scale.

Weaving the Past

Weaving the Past
Author: Susan Kellogg
Pages: 352
ISBN: 0198040423
Available:
Release: 2005-09-02
Editor: Oxford University Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Weaving the Past offers a comprehensive and interdisciplinary history of Latin America's indigenous women. While the book concentrates on native women in Mesoamerica and the Andes, it covers indigenous people in other parts of South and Central America, including lowland peoples in and beyond Brazil, and Afro-indigenous peoples, such as the Garifuna, of Central America. Drawing on primary and secondary sources, it argues that change, not continuity, has been the norm for indigenous peoples whose resilience in the face of complex and long-term patterns of cultural change is due in no small part to the roles, actions, and agency of women. The book provides broad coverage of gender roles in native Latin America over many centuries, drawing upon a range of evidence from archaeology, anthropology, religion, and politics. Primary and secondary sources include chronicles, codices, newspaper articles, and monographic work on specific regions. Arguing that Latin America's indigenous women were the critical force behind the more important events and processes of Latin America's history, Kellogg interweaves the region's history of family, sexual, and labor history with the origins of women's power in prehispanic, colonial, and modern South and Central America. Shying away from interpretations that treat women as house bound and passive, the book instead emphasizes women's long history of performing labor, being politically active, and contributing to, even supporting, family and community well-being.

Latin America in Colonial Times

Latin America in Colonial Times
Author: Matthew Restall,Kris Lane
Pages: 320
ISBN: 9781108416405
Available:
Release: 2018-06-14
Editor: Cambridge University Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

This second edition is a concise history of Latin America from the Aztecs and Incas to Independence.

Treatise on Slavery

Treatise on Slavery
Author: Alonso de Sandoval
Pages: 232
ISBN: 9781603840446
Available:
Release: 2008-03-14
Editor: Hackett Publishing
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

In De instauranda Aethiopum salute (1627)--the earliest known book-length study of African slavery in the colonial Americas--Jesuit priest Alonso de Sandoval described dozens of African ethnicities, their languages, and their beliefs, and provided an exposé of the abuse of slaves in the Americas. This collection of previously untranslated selections from Sandoval's book is an invaluable resource for understanding the history of the African diaspora, slavery in colonial Latin America, and the role of Christianity in the formation of the Spanish Empire; it also provides insights into early modern European concepts of race. A general Introduction and headnotes to each selection provide cultural, historical, and religious context; copious footnotes identify terms and references that may be unfamiliar to modern readers. A map and an index are also provided.

Cacicas

Cacicas
Author: Margarita R. Ochoa,Sara V. Guengerich
Pages: 344
ISBN: 9780806169781
Available:
Release: 2021-03-11
Editor: University of Oklahoma Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

The term cacica was a Spanish linguistic invention, a female counterpart to caciques, the Arawak word for male indigenous leaders in Spanish America. But the term’s meaning was adapted and manipulated by natives, creating a new social stratum where it previously may not have existed. This book explores that transformation, a conscious construction and reshaping of identity from within. Cacicas feature far and wide in the history of Spanish America, as female governors and tribute collectors and as relatives of ruling caciques—or their destitute widows. They played a crucial role in the establishment and success of Spanish rule, but were also instrumental in colonial natives’ resistance and self-definition. In this volume, noted scholars uncover the history of colonial cacicas, moving beyond anecdotes of individuals in Spanish America. Their work focuses on the evolution of indigenous leadership, particularly the lineage and succession of these positions in different regions, through the lens of native women’s political activism. Such activism might mean the intervention of cacicas in the economic, familial, and religious realms or their participation in official and unofficial matters of governance. The authors explore the role of such personal authority and political influence across a broad geographic, chronological, and thematic range—in patterns of succession, the settling of frontier regions, interethnic relations and the importance of purity of blood, gender and family dynamics, legal and marital strategies for defending communities, and the continuation of indigenous governance. This volume showcases colonial cacicas as historical subjects who constructed their consciousness around their place, whether symbolic or geographic, and articulated their own unique identities. It expands our understanding of the significant influence these women exerted—within but also well beyond the native communities of Spanish America.

The 1812 Aponte Rebellion in Cuba and the Struggle Against Atlantic Slavery

The 1812 Aponte Rebellion in Cuba and the Struggle Against Atlantic Slavery
Author: Matt D. Childs
Pages: 300
ISBN: 0807857726
Available:
Release: 2006
Editor: Univ of North Carolina Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

In 1812 a series of revolts known collectively as the Aponte Rebellion erupted across the island of Cuba, comprising one of the largest and most important slave insurrections in Caribbean history. Matt Childs provides the first in-depth analysis of the re

The Haitian Revolution

The Haitian Revolution
Author: David Geggus
Pages: 262
ISBN: 9781624661778
Available:
Release: 2014-09-03
Editor: Hackett Publishing
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

"A landmark collection of documents by the field's leading scholar. This reader includes beautifully written introductions and a fascinating array of never-before-published primary documents. These treasures from the archives offer a new picture of colonial Saint-Domingue and the Haitian Revolution. The translations are lively and colorful." --Alyssa Sepinwall, California State University San Marcos

Women and Gender in Modern Latin America

Women and Gender in Modern Latin America
Author: Pamela S Murray
Pages: 368
ISBN: 0415894549
Available:
Release: 2014
Editor: Unknown
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

"A collection of documents that illuminate women's roles in modern Latin American history, including current writing by scholars in the field, and primary sources such as interviews, speeches, testimony, government documents, and private correspondence, with introductions by the editor. Topics covered include feminism; labor and economics; revolution; and sex, marriage, and motherhood"--

Casta Painting

Casta Painting
Author: Ilona Katzew
Pages: 242
ISBN: 0300109717
Available:
Release: 2005-06-21
Editor: Yale University Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Casta painting is a distinctive Mexican genre that portrays racial mixing among the Indians, Spaniards & Africans who inhabited the colony, depicted in sets of consecutive images. Ilona Katzew places this art form in its social & historical context.

The Spanish Conquest in America and Its Relation to the History of Slavery and to the Government of Colonies

The Spanish Conquest in America and Its Relation to the History of Slavery and to the Government of Colonies
Author: Arthur Helps
Pages: 329
ISBN: BSB:BSB10253372
Available:
Release: 1857
Editor: Unknown
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

The Economic Development of Latin America in the Twentieth Century

The Economic Development of Latin America in the Twentieth Century
Author: André A. Hofman
Pages: 322
ISBN: STANFORD:36105025111738
Available:
Release: 2000
Editor: Edward Elgar Pub
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Hofman, a researcher with the Chile-based Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean, uses growth accounting methods and previously unavailable long-term series data to assess the economic performance of the region during the century from a comparative and historical perspective. In particular he compares Latin American economies to those of advanced capitalist economies, to newly industrialized economies, and to Spain and Portugal because of the historical ties. He looks at the reasons for the poor or negative growth during the 1980s and the apparent recovery in the 1990s and at such problems as debt, income inequality, high inflation, cyclical instability, and political and policy instability. Annotation copyrighted by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR

Colonialism in Global Perspective

Colonialism in Global Perspective
Author: Kris Manjapra
Pages: 300
ISBN: 9781108425261
Available:
Release: 2020-04-30
Editor: Cambridge University Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

A breath-taking comparative history of colonialism over the past 500 years, from the dawn of the New World to the twenty-first century.

Mexican National Identity

Mexican National Identity
Author: William H. Beezley
Pages: 206
ISBN: 0816526907
Available:
Release: 2008
Editor: University of Arizona Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

In this enlightening book, the well-known historian William Beezley contends that a Mexican national identity was forged during the nineteenth century not by a self-anointed elite but rather by a disparate mix of ordinary people and everyday events. In examining independence festivals, childrenÕs games, annual almanacs, and the performances of itinerant puppet theaters, Beezley argues that these seemingly unrelated and commonplace occurrencesÑnot the far more self-conscious and organized efforts of politicians, teachers, and othersÑcreated a far-reaching sense of a new nation. In the century that followed MexicoÕs independence from Spain in 1821, Beezley maintains, sentiments of nationality were promulgated by people who were concerned not with the promotion of nationalism but with something far more immediateÑthe need to earn a living. These peddlers, vendors, actors, artisans, writers, publishers, and puppeteers sought widespread popular appeal so that they could earn money. According to Beezley, they constantly refined their performances, as well as the symbols and images they employed, in order to secure larger revenues. Gradually they discovered the stories, acts, and products that attracted the largest numbers of paying customers. As Beezley convincingly asserts, out of Òwhat sold to the massesÓ a collective national identity slowly emerged. Mexican National Identity makes an important contribution to the growing body of literature that explores the influences of popular culture on issues of national identity. By looking at identity as it was fashioned Òin the streets,Ó it opens new avenues for exploring identity formation more generally, not just in Mexico and Latin American countries but in every nation. Check out the New Books in History Interview with Bill Beezley!

Convent Life in Colonial Mexico

Convent Life in Colonial Mexico
Author: Stephanie Kirk
Pages: 256
ISBN: 0813064937
Available:
Release: 2018-11-20
Editor: Unknown
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

The Catholic Church produced an enormous volume of written material designed to ensure the servility of nuns. Reading this body of proscriptive literature alongside nuns' own writings, Kirk finds that practice often diverged from theory. She analyzes how seventeenth- and eighteenth-century nuns formed alliances and friendships in defiance of Church authorities' efforts to contain and control them. In the Mexican convents that form the basis of Kirk's study, nuns developed a powerful, counterhegemonic spirit of female solidarity, establishing communities that made possible a surprising degree of productive autonomy, despite official promotion of oppressive ideas about gender and religiosity. Kirk also examines the motivations and discursive structures behind the Church's desire to regulate all aspects of convent life. Drawing on a rich and diverse body of literature that includes little-known texts, religious tracts, and didactic manuals on convent behavior, historical artifacts including Inquisition documents, letters, sermons, and official decrees, as well as poetry and inspirational religious biographies of exemplary nuns, Kirk's methodology is a departure from studies of the early modern nun as religious writer, focusing instead on the nun as historical agent. Kirk frames her study with well-regarded theory on discourse and gender, including works by Roland Barthes, Judith Butler, Michel Foucault, and Joan Scott. Addressing such important questions as the relationship between power and gender, female colonial agency and authorship, early modern subjectivity, and conflicting gender ideologies, Kirk demonstrates that both sides - the nuns and the Church authorities - are shown to manipulate, through conflicting discourses, the nuances of power and resistance. This first in-depth study of the positive community dynamics of female religious in the early modern Spanish world, as seen through their own words, will appeal to scholars of colonial, Latin American, women's, and religious studies.

The Intimacies of Four Continents

The Intimacies of Four Continents
Author: Lisa Lowe
Pages: 328
ISBN: 9780822375647
Available:
Release: 2015-05-20
Editor: Duke University Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

In this uniquely interdisciplinary work, Lisa Lowe examines the relationships between Europe, Africa, Asia, and the Americas in the late eighteenth- and early nineteenth- centuries, exploring the links between colonialism, slavery, imperial trades and Western liberalism. Reading across archives, canons, and continents, Lowe connects the liberal narrative of freedom overcoming slavery to the expansion of Anglo-American empire, observing that abstract promises of freedom often obscure their embeddedness within colonial conditions. Race and social difference, Lowe contends, are enduring remainders of colonial processes through which “the human” is universalized and “freed” by liberal forms, while the peoples who create the conditions of possibility for that freedom are assimilated or forgotten. Analyzing the archive of liberalism alongside the colonial state archives from which it has been separated, Lowe offers new methods for interpreting the past, examining events well documented in archives, and those matters absent, whether actively suppressed or merely deemed insignificant. Lowe invents a mode of reading intimately, which defies accepted national boundaries and disrupts given chronologies, complicating our conceptions of history, politics, economics, and culture, and ultimately, knowledge itself.

Not Fit for Our Society

Not Fit for Our Society
Author: Peter Schrag
Pages: 320
ISBN: 9780520269910
Available:
Release: 2011-06-21
Editor: Univ of California Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

"Peter Schrag is the model for all political writers. He is committed, passionate, and eloquent, but always stays harnessed to the facts and rooted in the realities of politics and human nature. He reports out everything, and he writes like a dream. We can be grateful that in Not Fit for Our Society he has turned his gifts to the seemingly intractable problem of immigration. We will have to settle this issue again, as we always manage to do despite enormous commotion and anxiety. Schrag will force everyone to think more clearly and to approach immigration with both compassion and good sense."—EJ Dionne, Jr., author of Souled Out "Just who is fit to be part of the society that became a nation in 1776 and who decides, and on what basis? In Not Fit for Our Society, Peter Schrag offers an invigorating, well-informed, carefully reasoned investigation into today's immigration debates."—David Hollinger, President of the Organization of American Historians, 2010-2011 "Peter Schrag has a unique view of the immigration debate and policies that have shaped our country since it's founding. His very timely writing of Not Fit for our Society helps us to better understand how the immigration debate and politics have gotten us to where we are today. His insights and intellect on the subject give all of us much to think about as we move forward on this very important issue."—Doris O. Matsui, Member of Congress "Peter Schrag has done it again. A sweeping review that puts the ferocity of our current immigration debate in historical context, Not Fit for Our Society is a must-read for those hoping to get past talk-show rhetoric and cherry-picked facts. Uncovering the dark impulses that have long undergirded nativist thought, he argues that we have seen this before—and that America will be better if we see through it again."—Manuel Pastor, University of Southern California "Peter Schrag offers a lively and thoughtful reinterpretation of America's ambivalence about immigration and immigrants' place in the nation's life. Drawing on his reading of primary sources and the latest scholarship, he tells a story rich in irony, detail, and nuance, tracing the history of nativism from the earliest days of the Republic to the current debates over immigration reform. The book is particularly striking for the way that it connects the arguments and organizations of the current anti-immigration movement to their roots in the eugenics movement and pseudo-scientific racism of the early 20th century."—Mark Paul, New America Foundation "[Schrag] delivers a story rich in irony, detail, and nuance, often told with passion and frequently challenging orthodoxies of both the political right and left. It is the right book at the right time."-Mark Paul, New America Foundation "History's lessons come through loud and clear as Peter Schrag vividly recounts the characters and the ideas behind that side of America that rejects immigration. Illuminating both in its sweep and its detail this 300-year narrative makes an important contribution to our understanding of today's policy debates."—Roberto Suro, author of Strangers Among US: Latino Lives in a Changing America "In an intemperate time, Peter Schrag's voice is lucid and truly American."—Richard Rodriguez