The Venetian Empire

The Venetian Empire
Author: Jan Morris
Pages: 208
ISBN: 9780141938028
Available:
Release: 1990-01-04
Editor: Penguin UK
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

For six centuries the Republic of Venice was a maritime empire, its sovereign power extending throughout much of the eastern Mediterranean – an empire of coasts, islands and isolated fortresses by which, as Wordsworth wrote, the mercantile Venetians 'held the gorgeous east in fee'. Jan Morris reconstructs the whole of this glittering dominion in the form of a sea-voyage, travelling along the historic Venetian trade routes from Venice itself to Greece, Crete and Cyprus. It is a traveller's book, geographically arranged but wandering at will from the past to the present, evoking not only contemporary landscapes and sensations but also the characters, the emotions and the tumultuous events of the past. The first such work ever written about the Venetian ‘Stato da Mar’, it is an invaluable historical companion for visitors to Venice itself and for travellers through the lands the Doges once ruled.

The Venetian Empire 1200 1670

The Venetian Empire 1200   1670
Author: David Nicolle
Pages: 48
ISBN: 0850458994
Available:
Release: 1989-03-23
Editor: Osprey Publishing
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

The story of Venice is, to some extent, separate from that of the rest of Europe. The same could be said of the city's military history and organisation. Early in the 9th century the Venetians defeated Pepin the Frank's attempts to overawe them, and they remained, at least in theory, subject to Byzantium. Gradually, however, Venice drifted into independence; and subsequently carved out its own empire at the expense of its former Byzantine masters. The Venetians were soon famous for their roving and warlike spirit, keen business acumen and pride. This book explores the remarkable history of the city and its army from 1200 up until 1670.

The Venetian Empire

The Venetian Empire
Author: James Morris
Pages: 329
ISBN: OCLC:640083943
Available:
Release: 1980
Editor: Unknown
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

The Venetian Bride

The Venetian Bride
Author: Patricia Fortini Brown
Pages: 448
ISBN: 9780192894571
Available:
Release: 2021-03
Editor: Oxford University Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

A true story of vendetta and intrigue, triumph and tragedy, exile and repatriation, this book recounts the interwoven microhistories of Count Girolamo Della Torre, a feudal lord with a castle and other properties in the Friuli, and Giulia Bembo, grand-niece of Cardinal Pietro Bembo and daughter of Gian Matteo Bembo, a powerful Venetian senator with a distinguished career in service to the Venetian Republic. Their marriage in the mid-sixteenth century might be regarded as emblematic of the Venetian experience, with the metropole at the center of a fragmented empire: a Terraferma nobleman and the daughter of a Venetian senator, who raised their family in far off Crete in the stato da mar, in Venice itself, and in the Friuli and the Veneto in the stato da terra. The fortunes and misfortunes of the nine surviving Della Torre children and their descendants, tracked through the end of the Republic in 1797, are likewise emblematic of a change in feudal culture from clan solidarity to individualism and intrafamily strife, and ultimately, redemption. Despite the efforts by both the Della Torre and the Bembo families to preserve the patrimony through a succession of male heirs, the last survivor in the paternal bloodline of each was a daughter. This epic tale highlights the role of women in creating family networks and opens a precious window into a contentious period in which Venetian republican values clash with the deeply rooted feudal traditions of honor and blood feuds of the mainland.

Cultures of Empire Rethinking Venetian Rule 1400 1700

Cultures of Empire  Rethinking Venetian Rule  1400   1700
Author: Anonim
Pages: 516
ISBN: 9789004428874
Available:
Release: 2020-07-27
Editor: BRILL
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

This book investigates perceptions, modes, and techniques of Venetian rule in the early modern Eastern Mediterranean (1400–1700) between colonial empire, negotiated and pragmatic rule; between soft touch and exploitation; in contexts of former and continuous imperial belongings; and with a focus on representations and modes of rule as well as on colonial daily realities and connectivities.

The Republic of Venice

The Republic of Venice
Author: Charles River Editors
Pages: 64
ISBN: 1092950095
Available:
Release: 2019-04-11
Editor: Independently Published
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

*Includes pictures *Includes medieval accounts *Includes online resources and a bibliography for further reading "As in the Arsenal of the VenetiansBoils in winter the tenacious pitchTo smear their unsound vessels over againFor sail they cannot; and instead thereofOne makes his vessel new, and one recaulksThe ribs of that which many a voyage has madeOne hammers at the prow, one at the sternThis one makes oars and that one cordage twistsAnother mends the mainsail and the mizzen..." - Dante's Inferno The mystical floating city of Venice has inspired awe for generations, and it continues to be one of the most visited European cities for good reason. Tourists are drawn to the stunning blend of classical, Gothic, and Renaissance-inspired architecture across the picturesque towns and villages, the charming open-air markets, the mouthwatering traditional cuisine, and of course, the famous gondolas drifting down the twinkling blue waters. While these gondolas, along with the time-honored models of the Venetian vessels docked in the harbors, are one of the city's most defining landmarks, their beginnings are shrouded in a more obscure part of Venetian history. To the first settlers of the unpromising, marshy islands of Venice in the 5th century BCE, it appeared as if any attempt at civilization was doomed to fail. Yet, even with the cards stacked against them, the artful inhabitants mastered the unlivable terrain and slowly pieced together a society that would put the small, unassuming city right on the map. In time, the city evolved into the most powerful maritime empire in all of Europe. Founded in the wake of the decline of the Roman Empire, the Republic of Venice lasted for more than a thousand years, from 697-1797, and in order to understand its singular position in world history, it is necessary to first note its geographical positioning and its topographical make-up: Located in northeastern Italy at the head of the Adriatic, the city is made up of 120 islands that are connected by 430 bridges that cross over 170 canals, referred to as a "rio" or plural "rii" (Italian for river). As a maritime power, the interests of Venice once reached all the way to Asia, which allowed it to form an important crossroads within the Eastern Mediterranean, in terms of trade. In Venice, a vast array of products (raw materials, spices, cloth) came all the way from North Africa, Russia, and India and were exchanged for the goods and wealth of Europe." Venice, of course, earned its remarkable reputation on its own merit, but the reason for its current fame should be credited at least in part to its status as one of the most important tourist destinations of all time, attracting travelers interested in religion, art, culture, architecture, the seashore as well as shopping. As far back as the 16th century, pilgrims flocked there to take in its numerous holy sites, the remnants of the city's medieval heritage, and in the 17th century, rich northern Europeans flocked to the city as part of their lengthy Grand Tour, hoping to feast their eyes on the unusual cityscape and its unique cultural heritage. Many of those famous writers penned unforgettable accounts of the city in English and in German, stories that only served to increase its fortunes over time. The Republic of Venice: The History of the Venetian Empire and Its Influence across the Mediterranean dives into the city's origin story, how it became one of the most important powers in Europe, and its inevitable undoing. Along with pictures of important people, places, and events, you will learn about the Venetian Republic like never before.

History of the Venetian Republic

History of the Venetian Republic
Author: William Carew Hazlitt
Pages: 329
ISBN: HARVARD:HN5K6W
Available:
Release: 1860
Editor: Unknown
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

The Venetian Empire

The Venetian Empire
Author: J Law Staff
Pages: 329
ISBN: 0582052769
Available:
Release: 2003-02
Editor: Unknown
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

City of Fortune

City of Fortune
Author: Roger Crowley
Pages: 464
ISBN: 9780679644262
Available:
Release: 2012-01-24
Editor: Random House
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

“The rise and fall of Venice’s empire is an irresistible story and [Roger] Crowley, with his rousing descriptive gifts and scholarly attention to detail, is its perfect chronicler.”—The Financial Times The New York Times bestselling author of Empires of the Sea charts Venice’s astounding five-hundred-year voyage to the pinnacle of power in an epic story that stands unrivaled for drama, intrigue, and sheer opulent majesty. City of Fortune traces the full arc of the Venetian imperial saga, from the ill-fated Fourth Crusade, which culminates in the sacking of Constantinople in 1204, to the Ottoman-Venetian War of 1499–1503, which sees the Ottoman Turks supplant the Venetians as the preeminent naval power in the Mediterranean. In between are three centuries of Venetian maritime dominance, during which a tiny city of “lagoon dwellers” grow into the richest place on earth. Drawing on firsthand accounts of pitched sea battles, skillful negotiations, and diplomatic maneuvers, Crowley paints a vivid picture of this avaricious, enterprising people and the bountiful lands that came under their dominion. From the opening of the spice routes to the clash between Christianity and Islam, Venice played a leading role in the defining conflicts of its time—the reverberations of which are still being felt today. “[Crowley] writes with a racy briskness that lifts sea battles and sieges off the page.”—The New York Times “Crowley chronicles the peak of Venice’s past glory with Wordsworthian sympathy, supplemented by impressive learning and infectious enthusiasm.”—The Wall Street Journal

The Venetian Empire

The Venetian Empire
Author: James Morris
Pages: 188
ISBN: OCLC:875108409
Available:
Release: 2014
Editor: Unknown
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

The Venetian Empire

The Venetian Empire
Author: Morris Jan
Pages: 329
ISBN: 0713971304
Available:
Release: 2000-01-01
Editor: Michael Joseph
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

A Short History of Venice and the Venetian Empire

A Short History of Venice and the Venetian Empire
Author: Maria Fusaro
Pages: 240
ISBN: 1780766149
Available:
Release: 2021
Editor: Unknown
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Venice s Intimate Empire

Venice s Intimate Empire
Author: Erin Maglaque
Pages: 240
ISBN: 9781501721663
Available:
Release: 2018-06-15
Editor: Cornell University Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Mining private writings and humanist texts, Erin Maglaque explores the lives and careers of two Venetian noblemen, Giovanni Bembo and Pietro Coppo, who were appointed as colonial administrators and governors. In Venice’s Intimate Empire, she uses these two men and their families to showcase the relationship between humanism, empire, and family in the Venetian Mediterranean. Maglaque elaborates an intellectual history of Venice’s Mediterranean empire by examining how Venetian humanist education related to the task of governing. Taking that relationship as her cue, Maglaque unearths an intimate view of the emotions and subjectivities of imperial governors. In their writings, it was the affective relationships between husbands and wives, parents and children, humanist teachers and their students that were the crucible for self-definition and political decision making. Venice’s Intimate Empire thus illuminates the experience of imperial governance by drawing connections between humanist education and family affairs. From marriage and reproduction to childhood and adolescence, we see how intimate life was central to the Bembo and Coppo families’ experience of empire. Maglaque skillfully argues that it was within the intimate family that Venetians’ relationships to empire—its politics, its shifting social structures, its metropolitan and colonial cultures—were determined.

Political Economies of Empire in the Early Modern Mediterranean

Political Economies of Empire in the Early Modern Mediterranean
Author: Maria Fusaro
Pages: 433
ISBN: 9781107060524
Available:
Release: 2015-05-05
Editor: Cambridge University Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Early modern European economic development seen through the interaction of two major players in the Mediterranean economy: Venice and England.

Brokering Empire

Brokering Empire
Author: E. Natalie Rothman
Pages: 352
ISBN: 9780801463112
Available:
Release: 2012-03-27
Editor: Cornell University Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

"Explores how diplomatic interpreters, converts, and commercial brokers mediated and helped define political, linguistic, and religious boundaries between the Venetian and Ottoman empires in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries."--Author's Web site.

Venice 697 1797

Venice  697 1797
Author: Alvise Zorzi
Pages: 278
ISBN: UOM:39015001767030
Available:
Release: 1983
Editor: Unknown
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Patricians and bankers - Confraternities and guilds - Religious and other festivals - Sports - Development and architecture of Venice - Venetian empire - Trade and traders - Merchants - Murano glass - Weavers - Ships - List of Patrician families - List of Doges of Venice.

Venice

Venice
Author: Thomas F. Madden
Pages: 464
ISBN: 9781101601136
Available:
Release: 2012-10-25
Editor: Penguin
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

An extraordinary chronicle of Venice, its people, and its grandeur Thomas Madden’s majestic, sprawling history of Venice is the first full portrait of the city in English in almost thirty years. Using long-buried archival material and a wealth of newly translated documents, Madden weaves a spellbinding story of a place and its people, tracing an arc from the city’s humble origins as a lagoon refuge to its apex as a vast maritime empire and Renaissance epicenter to its rebirth as a modern tourist hub. Madden explores all aspects of Venice’s breathtaking achievements: the construction of its unparalleled navy, its role as an economic powerhouse and birthplace of capitalism, its popularization of opera, the stunning architecture of its watery environs, and more. He sets these in the context of the rise and fall of the Byzantine Empire, the endless waves of Crusades to the Holy Land, and the awesome power of Turkish sultans. And perhaps most critically, Madden corrects the stereotype of Shakespeare’s money-lending Shylock that has distorted the Venetian character, uncovering instead a much more complex and fascinating story, peopled by men and women whose ingenuity and deep faith profoundly altered the course of civilization.

Venice s Most Loyal City

Venice s Most Loyal City
Author: Stephen D. Bowd
Pages: 359
ISBN: 9780674051201
Available:
Release: 2010
Editor: Harvard University Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

For the past generation, most historical work on the Italian Renaissance has been devoted to the ways in which city states such as Venice transformed their captured territories into a regional state during the fifteenth century. The territorial state approach de-emphasizes the persistence of communal politics and the communal identities of the subject cities of the new territorial states. Bowd’s study is an important corrective to this argument. Based on extensive archival research in Brescia and Venice, Venice’s Most Loyal City explores the creation of a civic identity based on local politics, religion, and ritual. Communal identity flourished in Brescia in ways that reveal the strength of local autonomy and the limits of state building in the triumphal age for Venice. It is especially sophisticated in the analysis of the treatment of Brescia’s Jews and alleged witches. By employing the most recent methods of historical analysis derived from ritual and religious studies, Bowd manages to return to an older conception of Renaissance Italy that has been eclipsed in recent years.

Enrico Dandolo and the Rise of Venice

Enrico Dandolo and the Rise of Venice
Author: Thomas F. Madden
Pages: 298
ISBN: 9780801885396
Available:
Release: 2006-09-29
Editor: JHU Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Between the eleventh and thirteenth centuries, Venice transformed itself from a struggling merchant commune to a powerful maritime empire that would shape events in the Mediterranean for the next four hundred years. In this magisterial new book on medieval Venice, Thomas F. Madden traces the city-state's extraordinary rise through the life of Enrico Dandolo (c. 1107–1205), who ruled Venice as doge from 1192 until his death. The scion of a prosperous merchant family deeply involved in politics, religion, and diplomacy, Dandolo led Venice's forces during the disastrous Fourth Crusade (1201–1204), which set out to conquer Islamic Egypt but instead destroyed Christian Byzantium. Yet despite his influence on the course of Venetian history, we know little about Dandolo, and much of what is known has been distorted by myth. The first full-length study devoted to Dandolo's life and times, Enrico Dandolo and the Rise of Venice corrects the many misconceptions about him that have accumulated over the centuries, offering an accurate and incisive assessment of Dandolo's motives, abilities, and achievements as doge, as well as his role—and Venice's—in the Fourth Crusade. Madden also examines the means and methods by which the Dandolo family rose to prominence during the preceding century, thus illuminating medieval Venice's singular political, social, and religious environment. Culminating with the crisis precipitated by the failure of the Fourth Crusade, Madden's groundbreaking work reveals the extent to which Dandolo and his successors became torn between the anxieties and apprehensions of Venice's citizens and its escalating obligations as a Mediterranean power.

A Companion to Venetian History 1400 1797

A Companion to Venetian History  1400 1797
Author: Anonim
Pages: 992
ISBN: 9789004252523
Available:
Release: 2013-07-11
Editor: BRILL
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

The Companion to Venetian History, 1400-1797 provides a single volume overview of the most recent developments. It is organized thematically and covers a range of topics including political culture, economy, religion, gender, art, literature, music, and the environment. Each chapter provides a broad but comprehensive historical and historiographical overview of the current state and future directions of research.