The Rigoberta Mench Controversy

The Rigoberta Mench   Controversy
Author: Arturo Arias,David Stoll
Pages: 418
ISBN: 0816636257
Available:
Release: 2001
Editor: U of Minnesota Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Guatemalan indigenous rights activist Rigoberta Menchu first came to international prominence following the 1983 publication of her memoir, I, Rigoberta Menchu, which chronicled in compelling detail the violence and misery that she and her people suffered during her country's brutal civil war. The book focused world attention on Guatemala and led to her being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1992. In 1999, a book by David Stoll challenged the veracity of key details in Menchu's account, generating a storm of controversy. Journalists and scholars squared off regarding whether Menchu had lied about her past and, if so, what that would mean about the larger truths revealed in her book. In The Rigoberta Menchu Controversy, Arturo Arias has assembled a casebook that offers a balanced perspective on the debate. The first section of this volume collects the primary documents -- newspaper articles, interviews, and official statements -- in which the debate raged, many translated into English for the first time. In the second section, a distinguished group of international scholars assesses the political, historical, and cultural contexts of the debate, and considers its implications for such issues as the "culture wars", historical truth, and the politics of memory. Also included is a new essay by David Stoll in which he responds to his critics.

I Rigoberta Mench

I  Rigoberta Mench
Author: Rigoberta Menchú Tum,Rigoberta Menchú
Pages: 251
ISBN: 0860917886
Available:
Release: 1984
Editor: Verso
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Her story reflects the experiences common to many Indian communities in Latin America today. Rigoberta suffered gross injustice and hardship in her early life: her brother, father and mother were murdered by the Guatemalan military. She learned Spanish and turned to catechist work as an expression of political revolt as well as religious commitment. The anthropologist Elisabeth Burgos-Debray, herself a Latin American woman, conducted a series of interviews with Rigoberta Menchu. The result is a book unique in contemporary literature which records the detail of everyday Indian life. Rigoberta’s gift for striking expression vividly conveys both the religious and superstitious beliefs of her community and her personal response to feminist and socialist ideas. Above all, these pages are illuminated by the enduring courage and passionate sense of justice of an extraordinary woman.

Rigoberta Menchu and the Story of All Poor Guatemalans

Rigoberta Menchu and the Story of All Poor Guatemalans
Author: David Stoll
Pages: 304
ISBN: 9780786732524
Available:
Release: 2009-04-28
Editor: Hachette UK
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Rigoberta Menchú is a living legend, a young woman who said that her odyssey from a Mayan Indian village to revolutionary exile was “the story of all poor Guatemalans.” By turning herself into an everywoman, she became a powerful symbol for 500 years of indigenous resistance to colonialism. Her testimony, I, Rigoberta Menchú, denounced atrocities by the Guatemalan army and propelled her to the 1992 Nobel Peace Prize. But her story was not the eyewitness account that she claimed. In this hotly debated book, key points of which have been corroborated by the New York Times, David Stoll compares a cult text with local testimony from Rigoberta Menchú's hometown. His reconstruction of her story goes to the heart of debates over political correctness and identity politics and provides a dramatic illustration of the rebirth of the sacred in the postmodern academy.This expanded edition includes a new foreword from Elizabeth Burgos, the editor of I, Rigoberta Menchú, as well as a new afterword from Stoll, who discusses Rigoberta Menchú's recent bid for the Guatemalan presidency and addresses the many controversies and debates that have arisen since the book was first published.

Rigoberta Menchu and the Story of All Poor Guatemalans

Rigoberta Menchu and the Story of All Poor Guatemalans
Author: David Stoll
Pages: 384
ISBN: 0813343968
Available:
Release: 2007-12-25
Editor: Westview Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Rigoberta Menchú is a living legend, a young woman who said that her odyssey from a Mayan Indian village to revolutionary exile was “the story of all poor Guatemalans.” By turning herself into an everywoman, she became a powerful symbol for 500 years of indigenous resistance to colonialism. Her testimony, I, Rigoberta Menchú, denounced atrocities by the Guatemalan army and propelled her to the 1992 Nobel Peace Prize. But her story was not the eyewitness account that she claimed. In this hotly debated book, key points of which have been corroborated by the New York Times, David Stoll compares a cult text with local testimony from Rigoberta Menchú's hometown. His reconstruction of her story goes to the heart of debates over political correctness and identity politics and provides a dramatic illustration of the rebirth of the sacred in the postmodern academy.This expanded edition includes a new foreword from Elizabeth Burgos, the editor of I, Rigoberta Menchú, as well as a new afterword from Stoll, who discusses Rigoberta Menchú's recent bid for the Guatemalan presidency and addresses the many controversies and debates that have arisen since the book was first published.

Who Is Rigoberta Menchu

Who Is Rigoberta Menchu
Author: Greg Grandin
Pages: 159
ISBN: 9781844674589
Available:
Release: 2011-02-21
Editor: Verso Books
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

In 1984, Nobel Peace Prize–winner and indigenous rights activist RigobertaMenchú published I, RigobertaMenchú, her autobiographical account of life in Guatemala undera military dictatorship to great acclaim. The book rapidly transformedthe study and understanding of modern Guatemalan history. Since then,her memoir has increasingly become a target for rightwing historians andcommentators seeking to discredit Menchú’s account and to deny thegenocide carried out by the Guatemalan military regime with US support.Greg Grandin, in this crucial accompaniment to Menchú’s work, takes onher critics to set the story straight. He investigates the historical contextand political realities that underlie Menchú’s past and the ongoing debatesurrounding it, in this substantial new work on Guatemalan history.

Crossing Borders

Crossing Borders
Author: Rigoberta Menchu,Rigoberta Menchú,Rigoberta Menchú Tum
Pages: 242
ISBN: UOM:39015041918197
Available:
Release: 1998
Editor: Verso Books
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Details the life of the Nobel Peace Prize winner, her flight from Guatemala to Mexico in 1981, and her resolve to dedicate her life to Indian causes

Tainted Witness

Tainted Witness
Author: Leigh Gilmore
Pages: 224
ISBN: 9780231543446
Available:
Release: 2017-01-17
Editor: Columbia University Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

In 1991, Anita Hill's testimony during Clarence Thomas's Senate confirmation hearing brought the problem of sexual harassment to a public audience. Although widely believed by women, Hill was defamed by conservatives and Thomas was confirmed to the Supreme Court. The tainting of Hill and her testimony is part of a larger social history in which women find themselves caught up in a system that refuses to believe what they say. Hill's experience shows how a tainted witness is not who someone is, but what someone can become. Why are women so often considered unreliable witnesses to their own experiences? How are women discredited in legal courts and in courts of public opinion? Why is women's testimony so often mired in controversies fueled by histories of slavery and colonialism? How do new feminist witnesses enter testimonial networks and disrupt doubt? Tainted Witness examines how gender, race, and doubt stick to women witnesses as their testimony circulates in search of an adequate witness. Judgment falls unequally upon women who bear witness, as well-known conflicts about testimonial authority in the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries reveal. Women's testimonial accounts demonstrate both the symbolic potency of women's bodies and speech in the public sphere and the relative lack of institutional security and control to which they can lay claim. Each testimonial act follows in the wake of a long and invidious association of race and gender with lying that can be found to this day within legal courts and everyday practices of judgment, defining these locations as willfully unknowing and hostile to complex accounts of harm. Bringing together feminist, literary, and legal frameworks, Leigh Gilmore provides provocative readings of what happens when women's testimony is discredited. She demonstrates how testimony crosses jurisdictions, publics, and the unsteady line between truth and fiction in search of justice.

Rigoberta Mench Tum

Rigoberta Mench   Tum
Author: EPUB 2-3
Pages: 329
ISBN: 9781438146454
Available:
Release: 2013-10-22
Editor: Infobase Learning
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

CHBiographies

Rigoberta Menchu And The Story Of All Poor Guatemalans

Rigoberta Menchu And The Story Of All Poor Guatemalans
Author: David Stoll
Pages: 368
ISBN: 9780429966132
Available:
Release: 2018-05-04
Editor: Routledge
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Rigoberta Menchú is a living legend, a young woman who said that her odyssey from a Mayan Indian village to revolutionary exile was "the story of all poor Guatemalans." By turning herself into an everywoman, she became a powerful symbol for 500 years of indigenous resistance to colonialism. Her testimony, I, Rigoberta Menchú, denounced atrocities by the Guatemalan army and propelled her to the 1992 Nobel Peace Prize. But her story was not the eyewitness account that she claimed. In this hotly debated book, key points of which have been corroborated by the New York Times, David Stoll compares a cult text with local testimony from Rigoberta Menchú's hometown. His reconstruction of her story goes to the heart of debates over political correctness and identity politics and provides a dramatic illustration of the rebirth of the sacred in the postmodern academy. This expanded edition includes a new foreword from Elizabeth Burgos, the editor of I, Rigoberta Menchú, as well as a new afterword from Stoll, who discusses Rigoberta Menchú's recent bid for the Guatemalan presidency and addresses the many controversies and debates that have arisen since the book was first published.

Taking Their Word

Taking Their Word
Author: Arturo Arias
Pages: 299
ISBN: 0816648484
Available:
Release: 2007
Editor: U of Minnesota Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

In Taking Their Word, Arias complicates notions of the cultural production of Central America. Arias demonstrates that Central America and its literature are marked by an indigenousness that has never before been fully theorized or critically grasped. With this groundbreaking work, Arias establishes the importance of Central American literature and provides a frame for future studies of the region's culture.

Racism Against Indigenous Peoples

Racism Against Indigenous Peoples
Author: International Work Group for Indigenous Affairs
Pages: 336
ISBN: 8790730461
Available:
Release: 2001
Editor: IWGIA
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

????. Gift: Schlein, Melvin.

Reyita

Reyita
Author: María de los Reyes Castillo Bueno,Daisy Rubiera Castillo
Pages: 182
ISBN: 0822325934
Available:
Release: 2000
Editor: Duke University Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Oral history of an elderly black woman recounting the story of her nine decades in Cuba.

Ethnography Through Thick and Thin

Ethnography Through Thick and Thin
Author: George E. Marcus
Pages: 275
ISBN: 0691002533
Available:
Release: 1998-12-13
Editor: Princeton University Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

In the 1980s, George Marcus spearheaded a major critique of cultural anthropology, expressed most clearly in the landmark book Writing Culture, which he coedited with James Clifford. Ethnography through Thick and Thin updates and advances that critique for the late 1990s. Marcus presents a series of penetrating and provocative essays on the changes that continue to sweep across anthropology. He examines, in particular, how the discipline's central practice of ethnography has been changed by "multi-sited" approaches to anthropology and how new research patterns are transforming anthropologists' careers. Marcus rejects the view, often expressed, that these changes are undermining anthropology. The combination of traditional ethnography with scholarly experimentation, he argues, will only make the discipline more lively and diverse. The book is divided into three main parts. In the first, Marcus shows how ethnographers' tradition of defining fieldwork in terms of peoples and places is now being challenged by the need to study culture by exploring connections, parallels, and contrasts among a variety of often seemingly incommensurate sites. The second part illustrates this emergent multi-sited condition of research by reflecting it in some of Marcus's own past research on Tongan elites and dynastic American fortunes. In the final section, which includes the previously unpublished essay "Sticking with Ethnography through Thick and Thin," Marcus examines the evolving professional culture of anthropology and the predicaments of its new scholars. He shows how students have increasingly been drawn to the field as much by such powerful interdisciplinary movements as feminism, postcolonial studies, and cultural studies as by anthropology's own traditions. He also considers the impact of demographic changes within the discipline--in particular the fact that anthropologists are no longer almost exclusively Euro-Americans studying non-Euro-Americans. These changes raise new issues about the identities of anthropologists in relation to those they study, and indeed, about what is to define standards of ethnographic scholarship. Filled with keen and highly illuminating observations, Ethnography through Thick and Thin will stimulate fresh debate about the past, present, and future of a discipline undergoing profound transformations.

Taking Their Word

Taking Their Word
Author: Arturo Arias
Pages: 299
ISBN: 9781452913162
Available:
Release: 2007
Editor: U of Minnesota Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Central Americans are one of the largest Latino population groups in the United States. Yet, Arturo Arias argues, the cultural production of Central Americans remains little known to North Americans. In Taking Their Word, Arias complicates notions of the cultural production of Central America, from Mexico in the North to Panama in the South. He charts the literature of Central America’s liberation struggles of the 1970s and 1980s, its transformation after peace treaties were signed, the emergence of a new Maya literature that decenters Latin American literature written in Spanish, and the rise and fall of testimonio. Arias demonstrates that Central America and its literature are marked by an indigenousness that has never before been fully theorized or critically grasped. Never one to avoid controversy, Arias proffers his views of how the immigration of Central Americans to North America has changed the cultural topography of both zones. With this groundbreaking work, Arias establishes the importance of Central American literature and provides a frame for future studies of the region’s culture. Arturo Arias is director of Latin American studies at the University of Redlands. He is the author of six novels in Spanish and editor of The Rigoberta Mench Controversy (Minnesota, 2001).

Scandals and Scoundrels

Scandals and Scoundrels
Author: Ron Robin
Pages: 289
ISBN: 0520938151
Available:
Release: 2004-10-11
Editor: Univ of California Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Ron Robin takes an intriguing look at the shifting nature of academic and public discourse in this incisive consideration of recent academic scandals—including charges of plagiarism against Stephen Ambrose, Derek Freeman's attempt to debunk Margaret Mead's research, Michael Bellesiles's alleged fabrication of an early America without weapons, Joseph Ellis's imaginary participation in major historical events of the 1960s, Napoleon Chagnon's creation and manipulation of a "Stone Age people," and accusations that Nobel Peace Prize winner Rigoberta Menchú's testimony on the Maya holocaust was in part fiction. Scandals and Scoundrels makes the case that, contrary to popular imagery, we're not living in particularly deviant times and there is no fundamental flaw permeating a decadent academy. Instead, Robin argues, latter-day scandals are media events, tailored for the melodramatic and sensationalist formats of mass mediation. In addition, the contentious and uninhibited nature of cyberdebates fosters acrimonious exposure. Ron convincingly demonstrates that scandals are part of a necessary process of rule making and reinvention rather than a symptom of the bankruptcy of the scientific enterprise.

The Blood of Guatemala

The Blood of Guatemala
Author: Greg Grandin
Pages: 364
ISBN: 9780822380337
Available:
Release: 2000-03-15
Editor: Duke University Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Over the latter half of the twentieth century, the Guatemalan state slaughtered more than two hundred thousand of its citizens. In the wake of this violence, a vibrant pan-Mayan movement has emerged, one that is challenging Ladino (non-indigenous) notions of citizenship and national identity. In The Blood of Guatemala Greg Grandin locates the origins of this ethnic resurgence within the social processes of eighteenth- and nineteenth-century state formation rather than in the ruins of the national project of recent decades. Focusing on Mayan elites in the community of Quetzaltenango, Grandin shows how their efforts to maintain authority over the indigenous population and secure political power in relation to non-Indians played a crucial role in the formation of the Guatemalan nation. To explore the close connection between nationalism, state power, ethnic identity, and political violence, Grandin draws on sources as diverse as photographs, public rituals, oral testimony, literature, and a collection of previously untapped documents written during the nineteenth century. He explains how the cultural anxiety brought about by Guatemala’s transition to coffee capitalism during this period led Mayan patriarchs to develop understandings of race and nation that were contrary to Ladino notions of assimilation and progress. This alternative national vision, however, could not take hold in a country plagued by class and ethnic divisions. In the years prior to the 1954 coup, class conflict became impossible to contain as the elites violently opposed land claims made by indigenous peasants. This “history of power” reconsiders the way scholars understand the history of Guatemala and will be relevant to those studying nation building and indigenous communities across Latin America.

Young Castro

Young Castro
Author: Jonathan M. Hansen
Pages: 512
ISBN: 9781476732480
Available:
Release: 2020-06-30
Editor: Simon & Schuster
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

This intimate, revisionist portrait of Fidel Castro, showing how an unlikely young Cuban led his country in revolution and transfixed the world, is “sure to become the standard on Castro’s early life” (Publishers Weekly). Until now, biographers have treated Castro’s life like prosecutors, scouring his past for evidence to convict a person they don’t like or don’t understand. Young Castro challenges us to put aside the caricature of a bearded, cigar-munching, anti-American hothead to discover how Castro became the dictator who acted as a thorn in the side of US presidents for nearly half a century. In this “gripping and edifying narrative…Hansen brings imposing research and notable erudition” (Booklist) to Castro’s early life, showing Castro getting his toughness from a father who survived Spain’s class system and colonial wars to become one of the most successful independent plantation owners in Cuba. We see a boy running around that plantation more comfortable playing with the children of his father’s laborers than his own classmates at elite boarding schools in Santiago de Cuba and Havana. We discover a young man who writes flowery love letters from prison and contemplates the meaning of life, a gregarious soul attentive to the needs of strangers but often indifferent to the needs of his own family. These pages show a liberal democrat who admires FDR’s New Deal policies and is skeptical of communism, but is also hostile to American imperialism. They show an audacious militant who stages a reckless attack on a military barracks but is canny about building an army of resisters. In short, Young Castro reveals a complex man. The first American historian in a generation to gain access to the Castro archives in Havana, Jonathan Hansen was able to secure cooperation from Castro’s family and closest confidants. He gained access to hundreds of never-before-seen letters and interviewed people he was the first to ask for their impressions of the man. The result is a nuanced and penetrating portrait of a man at once brilliant, arrogant, bold, vulnerable, and all too human: a man who, having grown up on an island that felt like a colonial cage, was compelled to lead his country to independence.

Testimonio

Testimonio
Author: John Beverley
Pages: 121
ISBN: 0816628408
Available:
Release: 2004
Editor: U of Minnesota Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

These four germinal essays by John Beverley sparked the widespread discussion and debate surrounding testimonio--the socially and politically charged Latin American narrative of witnessing--that culminated, with David Stoll's highly publicized attack on Rigoberta Menchu's celebrated testimonial text. Challenging Hardt and Negri's "Empire, Beverley's extensive new introduction examines the broader historical, political, and ethical issues that this literature raises, tracing the development of testimonio from its emergence in the Cold War era to the rise of a globalized economy and of U.S. political hegemony. Informed by postcolonial studies and the current debate over multiculturalism and identity politics, "Testimonio reaches across disciplinary boundaries to show how this particular literature at once represents and enacts new forms of agency on the part of previously repressed social subjects, as well as its potential as a new form of "alliance politics" between those subjects and artists, scientists, teachers, and intellectuals in a variety of local, national, and international contexts.

Modern Latin America

Modern Latin America
Author: Thomas Thomas E.,Thomas E. Skidmore,Peter Peter H.,Peter H. Smith
Pages: 449
ISBN: UOM:39015054422335
Available:
Release: 1992
Editor: Oxford University Press, USA
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

The Heart of the Matter

The Heart of the Matter
Author: Wesely M. Collins
Pages: 222
ISBN: 1556713754
Available:
Release: 2015-11-12
Editor: Sil International, Global Publishing
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Can a culture have a theme that unifies seemingly unrelated practices? In this volume, Collins suggests that Maya-Mam customs as different as constructing a house, staying healthy, seeking God, disciplining children, agreeing to a contract, or just speaking the language, all originate from the same concept- a search for the center. This is far more than mere balance, long recognized as a Mayan cultural value. Rather, center space is a place of physical and metaphysical peace, acceptance, meaning, health, happiness and "home." Collins also shows how cenderedness is deeply embedded in the grammar of Mam- its lexicon, morphology, syntax, and discourse structure. This relatedness of Mam culture and linguistics provides an unusually detailed contribution to the debate on linguistic relativity and the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis. Collins combines historical accounts with firsthand ethnographic and linguistic methodology to explore the concept of centeredness. Detailed accounts of his personal interaction with the Mam illustrate and enrich the book's concepts. This volume will interest students of the relationship between language and culture generally, and specifically those interested in the study of Maya of Mexico and Guatemala. Wesley M. Collins (Ph.D., The Ohio State University), along with his family, lived and worked among the Maya-Mam people for over 30 years. He currently directs the CILTA linguistic training course in Peru. His academic interests include linguistic development of indigenous languages and Mam-language research