The Holocaust s Jewish Calendars

The Holocaust s Jewish Calendars
Author: Alan Rosen
Pages: 272
ISBN: 9780253038289
Available:
Release: 2019-02-28
Editor: Indiana University Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Calendars map time, shaping and delineating our experience of it. While the challenges to tracking Jewish conceptions of time during the Holocaust were substantial, Alan Rosen reveals that many took great risks to mark time within that vast upheaval. Rosen inventories and organizes Jewish calendars according to the wartime settings in which they were produced—from Jewish communities to ghettos and concentration camps. The calendars he considers reorient views of Jewish circumstances during the war and show how Jews were committed to fashioning traditional guides to daily life, even in the most extreme conditions. In a separate chapter, moreover, he elucidates how Holocaust-era diaries sometimes served as surrogate Jewish calendars. All in all, Rosen presents a revised idea of time, continuity, the sacred and the mundane, the ordinary and the extraordinary even when death and destruction were the order of the day. Rosen’s focus on the Jewish calendar—the ultimate symbol of continuity, as weekday follows weekday and Sabbath follows Sabbath—sheds new light on how Jews maintained connections to their way of conceiving time even within the cauldron of the Holocaust.

The Holocaust s Jewish Calendars

The Holocaust s Jewish Calendars
Author: Alan Rosen
Pages: 271
ISBN: 9780253038302
Available:
Release: 2019-02-28
Editor: Indiana University Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

“The most comprehensive to date treatment of these precious artifacts of the Holocaust’s Jewish efforts to maintain religious observations and identity.” —Choice Calendars map time, shaping and delineating our experience of it. While the challenges to tracking Jewish conceptions of time during the Holocaust were substantial, Alan Rosen reveals that many took great risks to mark time within that vast upheaval. Rosen inventories and organizes Jewish calendars according to the wartime settings in which they were produced—from Jewish communities to ghettos and concentration camps. The calendars he considers reorient views of Jewish circumstances during the war and show how Jews were committed to fashioning traditional guides to daily life, even in the most extreme conditions. In a separate chapter, moreover, he elucidates how Holocaust-era diaries sometimes served as surrogate Jewish calendars. All in all, Rosen presents a revised idea of time, continuity, the sacred and the mundane, the ordinary and the extraordinary even when death and destruction were the order of the day. Rosen’s focus on the Jewish calendar—the ultimate symbol of continuity, as weekday follows weekday and Sabbath follows Sabbath—sheds new light on how Jews maintained connections to their way of conceiving time even within the cauldron of the Holocaust. “Rosen demonstrates the relationship between time and meaning, between meaning and holiness, between holy days and the divine presence―all of which came under assault in the Nazis’ effort to kill Jewish souls before destroying Jewish bodies.” —David Patterson, author of Along the Edge of Annihilation: The Collapse and Recovery of Life in the Holocaust Diary

And Every Single One Was Someone

And Every Single One Was Someone
Author: Phil Chernofsky
Pages: 1250
ISBN: 9652295914
Available:
Release: 2012-12-20
Editor: Unknown
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

As a math and Jewish studies teacher in a Jewish day school, Chernofsky wanted a different and meaningful way for his students to relate to the Holocaust. From there evolved this book that has just one word, six million times JEW. What would a book of six million Jews look like? This is a volume meant for library and institution presentations on the Holocaust, a daring attempt to give some small sense of the overwhelming number - six million.

From Fasting to Feasting

From Fasting to Feasting
Author: Joe Bobker
Pages: 240
ISBN: 9652293784
Available:
Release: 2008
Editor: Unknown
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Join Joe Bobker on a fascinating journey through the Jewish Festivals. You will laugh, you will cry but this roller-coaster cyclical ride through Jewish history, holidays, halacha, lore and minhag is worth the trip! In this extraordinary, insightful analysis of the Jewish calendar, Joe Bobkers refreshingly unique and playful approach of asking questions and searching for answers brings thousand-year-old Jewish festival practices into easy focus. In his examination of each Jewish festival, Joe Bobker utilises a wealth of knowledge, personal experience and a fiery dedication to the tenets of Yiddishkeit to bring forth this stirringly original work.

Palaces of Time

Palaces of Time
Author: Elisheva Carlbach
Pages: 292
ISBN: 9780674052543
Available:
Release: 2011-04-04
Editor: Harvard University Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Utilizes adaptations of the Jewish calendar as a way to better understand modern Jewish life adapting to the Christian world.

America American Jews and the Holocaust

America  American Jews  and the Holocaust
Author: Jeffrey S. Gurock
Pages: 486
ISBN: 0415919312
Available:
Release: 1998
Editor: Taylor & Francis
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

First Published in 1998. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Elie Wiesel

Elie Wiesel
Author: Steven T. Katz,Alan Rosen
Pages: 313
ISBN: 9780253008121
Available:
Release: 2013-05-17
Editor: Indiana University Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

“Illuminating . . . 24 academic essays covering Wiesel’s interpretations of the Bible, retellings of Talmudic stories . . . his post-Holocaust theology, and more.” —Publishers Weekly Nobel Peace Prize recipient Elie Wiesel, best known for his writings on the Holocaust, is also the accomplished author of novels, essays, tales, and plays as well as portraits of seminal figures in Jewish life and experience. In this volume, leading scholars in the fields of Biblical, Rabbinic, Hasidic, Holocaust, and literary studies offer fascinating and innovative analyses of Wiesel’s texts as well as enlightening commentaries on his considerable influence as a teacher and as a moral voice for human rights. By exploring the varied aspects of Wiesel’s multifaceted career—his texts on the Bible, the Talmud, and Hasidism as well as his literary works, his teaching, and his testimony—this thought-provoking volume adds depth to our understanding of the impact of this important man of letters and towering international figure. “This book reveals Elie Wiesel’s towering intellectual capacity, his deeply held spiritual belief system, and the depth of his emotional makeup.” —New York Journal of Books “Close, scholarly readings of a master storyteller’s fiction, memoirs and essays suggest his uncommon breadth and depth . . . Criticism that enhances the appreciation of readers well-versed in the author’s work.” —Kirkus Reviews “Navigating deftly among Wiesel’s varied scholarly and literary works, the authors view his writings from religious, social, political, and literary perspectives in highly accessible prose that will well serve a broad and diverse readership.” —S. Lillian Kremer author of Women’s Holocaust Writing: Memory and Imagination

The Wonder of Their Voices

The Wonder of Their Voices
Author: Alan Rosen
Pages: 336
ISBN: 0199780765
Available:
Release: 2010-10-18
Editor: Oxford University Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Over the last several decades, video testimony with aging Holocaust survivors has brought these witnesses into the limelight. Yet the success of these projects has made it seem that little survivor testimony took place in earlier years. In truth, thousands of survivors began to recount their experience at the earliest opportunity. This book provides the first full-length case study of early postwar Holocaust testimony, focusing on David Boder's 1946 displaced persons interview project. In July 1946, Boder, a psychologist, traveled to Europe to interview victims of the Holocaust who were in the Displaced Persons (DP) camps and what he called "shelter houses." During his nine weeks in Europe, Boder carried out approximately 130 interviews in nine languages and recorded them on a wire recorder. Likely the earliest audio recorded testimony of Holocaust survivors, the interviews are valuable today for the spoken word (that of the DP narrators and of Boder himself) and also for the song sessions and religious services that Boder recorded. Eighty sessions were eventually transcribed into English, most of which were included in a self-published manuscript. Alan Rosen sets Boder's project in the context of the postwar response to displaced persons, sketches the dramatic background of his previous life and work, chronicles in detail the evolving process of interviewing both Jewish and non-Jewish DPs, and examines from several angles the implications for the history of Holocaust testimony. Such early postwar testimony, Rosen avers, deserves to be taken on its own terms rather than to be enfolded into earlier or later schemas of testimony. Moreover, Boder's efforts and the support he was given for them demonstrate that American postwar response to the Holocaust was not universally indifferent but rather often engaged, concerned, and resourceful.

The Holocaust the French and the Jews

The Holocaust  the French  and the Jews
Author: Susan Zuccotti
Pages: 383
ISBN: 0803299141
Available:
Release: 1999-01-01
Editor: U of Nebraska Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

ø Many recent books have documented the collaboration of the French authorities with the anti-Jewish German policies of World War II. Yet about 76 percent of France?s Jews survived?more than in almost any other country in Western Europe. How do we explain this phenomenon? Certainly not by looking at official French policy, for the Vichy government began preparing racial laws even before the German occupiers had decreed such laws. To provide a full answer to the question of how so many French Jews survived, Susan Zuccotti examines the response of the French people to the Holocaust. Drawing on memoirs, government documents, and personal interviews with survivors, she tells the stories of ordinary and extraordinary French men and women. Zuccotti argues that the French reaction to the Holocaust was not as reprehensible as it has been portrayed.

Renia s Diary

Renia s Diary
Author: Renia Spiegel
Pages: 288
ISBN: 9781250256126
Available:
Release: 2019-09-24
Editor: St. Martin's Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

A New York Times bestseller A USA Today bestseller The long-hidden diary of a young Polish woman's life during the Holocaust, translated for the first time into English Renia Spiegel was born in 1924 to an upper-middle class Jewish family living in southeastern Poland, near what was at that time the border with Romania. At the start of 1939 Renia began a diary. “I just want a friend. I want somebody to talk to about my everyday worries and joys. Somebody who would feel what I feel, who would believe me, who would never reveal my secrets. A human being can never be such a friend and that’s why I have decided to look for a confidant in the form of a diary.” And so begins an extraordinary document of an adolescent girl’s hopes and dreams. By the fall of 1939, Renia and her younger sister Elizabeth (née Ariana) were staying with their grandparents in Przemysl, a city in the south, just as the German and Soviet armies invaded Poland. Cut off from their mother, who was in Warsaw, Renia and her family were plunged into war. Like Anne Frank, Renia’s diary became a record of her daily life as the Nazis spread throughout Europe. Renia writes of her mundane school life, her daily drama with best friends, falling in love with her boyfriend Zygmund, as well as the agony of missing her mother, separated by bombs and invading armies. Renia had aspirations to be a writer, and the diary is filled with her poignant and thoughtful poetry. When she was forced into the city’s ghetto with the other Jews, Zygmund is able to smuggle her out to hide with his parents, taking Renia out of the ghetto, but not, ultimately to safety. The diary ends in July 1942, completed by Zygmund, after Renia is murdered by the Gestapo. Renia's Diary has been translated from the original Polish, and includes a preface, afterword, and notes by her surviving sister, Elizabeth Bellak. An extraordinary historical document, Renia Spiegel survives through the beauty of her words and the efforts of those who loved her and preserved her legacy.

Holocaust and Human Behavior

Holocaust and Human Behavior
Author: Facing History and Ourselves
Pages: 734
ISBN: 1940457181
Available:
Release: 2017-03-24
Editor: Facing History & Ourselves National Foundation, Incorporated
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Holocaust and Human Behavior uses readings, primary source material, and short documentary films to examine the challenging history of the Holocaust and prompt reflection on our world today

Inside the Gas Chambers

Inside the Gas Chambers
Author: Shlomo Venezia,Béatrice Prasquier
Pages: 202
ISBN: 9780745643830
Available:
Release: 2009-02-02
Editor: Polity
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

This is a unique, eye-witness account of everyday life right at the heart of the Nazi extermination machine. Slomo Venezia was born into a poor Jewish-Italian community living in Thessaloniki, Greece. At first, the occupying Italians protected his family; but when the Germans invaded, the Venezias were deported to Auschwitz. His mother and sisters disappeared on arrival, and he learned, at first with disbelief, that they had almost certainly been gassed. Given the chance to earn a little extra bread, he agreed to become a ‘Sonderkommando', without realising what this entailed. He soon found himself a member of the ‘special unit' responsible for removing the corpses from the gas chambers and burning their bodies. Dispassionately, he details the grim round of daily tasks, evokes the terror inspired by the man in charge of the crematoria, ‘Angel of Death' Otto Moll, and recounts the attempts made by some of the prisoners to escape, including the revolt of October 1944. It is usual to imagine that none of those who went into the gas chambers at Auschwitz ever emerged to tell their tale - but, as a member of a ‘Sonderkommando', Shlomo Venezia was given this horrific privilege. He knew that, having witnessed the unspeakable, he in turn would probably be eliminated by the SS in case he ever told his tale. He survived: this is his story. Published in association with the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.

A Companion to the Holocaust

A Companion to the Holocaust
Author: Simone Gigliotti,Hilary Earl
Pages: 704
ISBN: 9781118970515
Available:
Release: 2020-04-14
Editor: John Wiley & Sons
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Provides a cutting-edge, nuanced, and multi-disciplinary picture of the Holocaust from local, transnational, continental, and global perspectives Holocaust Studies is a dynamic field that encompasses discussions on human behavior, extremity, and moral action. A diverse range of disciplines – history, philosophy, literature, social psychology, anthropology, geography, amongst others – continue to make important contributions to its scholarship. A Companion to the Holocaust provides exciting commentaries on current and emerging debates and identifies new connections for research. The text incorporates new language, geographies, and approaches to address the precursors of the Holocaust and examine its global consequences. A team of international contributors provides insightful and sophisticated analyses of current trends in Holocaust research that go far beyond common conceptions of the Holocaust’s causes, unfolding and impact. Scholars draw on their original research to interpret current, agenda-setting historical and historiographical debates on the Holocaust. Six broad sections cover wide-ranging topics such as new debates about Nazi perpetrators, arguments about the causes and places of persecution of Jews in Germany and Europe, and Jewish and non-Jewish responses to it, the use of forced labor in the German war economy, representations of the Holocaust witness, and many others. A masterful framing chapter sets the direction and tone of each section’s themes. Comprising over thirty essays, this important addition to Holocaust studies: Offers a remarkable compendium of systematic, comparative, and precise analyses Covers areas and topics not included in any other companion of its type Examines the ongoing cultural, social, and political legacies of the Holocaust Includes discussions on non-European and non-Western geographies, inter-ethnic tensions, and violence A Companion to the Holocaust is an essential resource for students and scholars of European, German, genocide, colonial and Jewish history, as well as those in the general humanities.

Holocaust

Holocaust
Author: Stephen Wynn
Pages: 168
ISBN: 9781526728227
Available:
Release: 2020-04-19
Editor: Pen and Sword
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

The Holocaust is without doubt one of the most abhorrent and despicable events not only of the Second World War, but of the twentieth century. What makes it even more staggering is that it was not perpetrated by just one individual, but by thousands of men and women who had become part of the Nazi ideology and belief that Jews were responsible for all of their woes. This book looks at the build up to the Second World War, from the time of Hitler's appointment as Chancellor of Germany in January 1933, as the Nazi Party rose to power in a country that was still struggling to recover politically, socially and financially from the aftermath of the First World War, whilst at the same time, through the enactment of a number of laws, making life extremely difficult for German Jews. Some saw the dangers ahead for Jews in Germany and did their best to get out, some managed to do so, but millions more did not. The book then moves on to look at a wartime Nazi Germany and how the dislike of the Jews had gone from painting the star of David on shop windows, to their mass murder in the thousands of concentration camps that were scattered throughout Germany. As well as the camps, it looks at some of those who were culpable for the atrocities that were carried out in the name of Nazism. Not all those who were murdered lost their lives in concentration camps. Some were killed in massacres, some in ghettos and some by the feared and hated Einsatzgruppen.

Holocaust Literature

Holocaust Literature
Author: David G. Roskies,Naomi Diamant
Pages: 355
ISBN: 9781611683592
Available:
Release: 2012
Editor: UPNE
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

A comprehensive assessment of Holocaust literature, from World War II to the present day

Deadly Medicine

Deadly Medicine
Author: Susan D. Bachrach,Dieter Kuntz,United States Holocaust Memorial Museum
Pages: 226
ISBN: UVA:X004803737
Available:
Release: 2004
Editor: University of North Carolina Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

A catalog to accompany an exhibit at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum on the subject of the Nazi eugenics program.

Zohar the Book of Enlightenment

Zohar  the Book of Enlightenment
Author: Daniel Chanan Matt,Arthur Green
Pages: 320
ISBN: 0809123878
Available:
Release: 1983
Editor: Paulist Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

This is the first translation with commentary of selections from The Zohar, the major text of the Kabbalah, the Jewish mystical tradition. This work was written in 13th-century Spain by Moses de Leon, a Spanish scholar.

Historical Dictionary of the Holocaust

Historical Dictionary of the Holocaust
Author: Jack R. Fischel
Pages: 410
ISBN: 0810874857
Available:
Release: 2010-07-17
Editor: Scarecrow Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

This second edition of the Historical Dictionary of the Holocaust includes an updated chronology, an introductory essay, a bibliography, and over 400 cross-referenced dictionary entries on significant events and personalities.

A History of the Holocaust

A History of the Holocaust
Author: Saul S. Friedman
Pages: 494
ISBN: 0853034354
Available:
Release: 2004
Editor: Unknown
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

A History of the Holocaust is a detailed account of what happened across Europe during the Holocaust, with balanced coverage of each country. A History of the Holocaust is intended as a textbook, not a philosophical interpretation of the Holocaust. Written in a highly accessible style, it is addressed to students in the hope that they will be inspired to read more, to question and become actively involved in the problems of our world.

Thinking about the Holocaust

Thinking about the Holocaust
Author: Alvin Hirsch Rosenfeld,Professor of English and Director of the Jewish Studies Program Alvin H Rosenfeld
Pages: 329
ISBN: 0253211379
Available:
Release: 1997
Editor: Indiana University Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

From the still-unsettling perspective of half a century, 13 contributors evaluate Holocaust fallout from four vantage points: through historical writings, literature, and cinema; in relation to the Zionist movement and the state of Israel; and its impact on American Jewish life, and on European Jewry in the postwar period. The incisive articles result from meetings at Indiana University in 1995. Annotation copyrighted by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR