The Colour of Justice

The Colour of Justice
Author: David M. Tanovich
Pages: 268
ISBN: 1552211193
Available:
Release: 2006
Editor: Unknown
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Many police and security officials make judgments based on race, ethnicity, and religion. This book is the first in-depth look at racial profiling in Canada, using social science evidence, judicial decisions, media reports, and government and police documents. The work aims to foster understanding and reform by addressing why police profile, what damage it causes, and whether it is ever reasonable.

The Colour of Justice

The Colour of Justice
Author: Richard Norton-Taylor
Pages: 88
ISBN: 9781849437219
Available:
Release: 2012-08-10
Editor: Bloomsbury Publishing
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

In 1993, black teenager Stephen Lawrence was stabbed to death in a racist attack by a gang of white youths. The police investigation failed to provide sufficient evidence to convict. Based on the harrowing transcripts of the public inquiry, this is a dramatic reconstruction of the first hearings which reflected the national outcry at the police's mishandling of the case. First seen at the Tricycle Theatre, London, this remarkable production received instant acclaim and subsequently transferred to the West End.

The Colour of Justice

The Colour of Justice
Author: Richard Norton-Taylor
Pages: 44
ISBN: OCLC:681170294
Available:
Release: 1999*
Editor: Unknown
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

The Colour of Justice

The Colour of Justice
Author: Richard Norton-Taylor
Pages: 329
ISBN: OCLC:1107674083
Available:
Release: 2001
Editor: Unknown
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

A dramatised reconstruction of the events in the six month inquiry into the murder of Stephen Lawrence. The case has gone from being a black family tragedy to a British tragedy, with the public identifying with his parents' loss and subsequent sense of outrage.

The Color of Life

The Color of Life
Author: Cara Meredith
Pages: 240
ISBN: 9780310353003
Available:
Release: 2019-02-05
Editor: Zondervan
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Cara Meredith grew up in a colorless world. From childhood, she didn't think issues of race had anything to do with her. A colorblind rhetoric had been stamped across her education, world view, and Christian theology. Then as an adult, Cara's life took on new, colorful hues. She realized that her generation, seeking to move beyond ancestral racism, had swung so far that they tried to act as if they didn't see race at all. But that picture neglected the unique cultural identity God gives each person. When Cara met and fell in love with the son of black icon, James Meredith, she began to listen to the stories and experiences of others in a new way, taking note of the cultures, sounds and shades of life already present around her. After she married and their little family grew to include two mixed-race sons, Cara knew she would never see the world through a colorless lens again. A writer and speaker in an interracial marriage and mixed-race family, Cara finds herself more and more in the middle of discussions about racial justice. In The Color of Life, she asks how do we navigate ongoing and desperately-needed conversations about race? How do we teach our children a theology of reconciliation and love? And what does it mean to live a life that makes space for seeing the imago Dei in everyone? Cara's illuminating memoir paints a beautiful path from white privilege toward racial healing, from ignorance toward seeing the image of God in everyone she meets.

Unequal Justice

Unequal Justice
Author: Coramae Richey Mann
Pages: 301
ISBN: 0253207835
Available:
Release: 1993
Editor: Indiana University Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Examines the role of skin color and the possibility of legal inequities based on race in the American criminal justice system. By the author of Female Crime and Delinquency. Simultaneous.

The Color of Justice Race Ethnicity and Crime in America

The Color of Justice  Race  Ethnicity  and Crime in America
Author: Samuel Walker,Cassia Spohn,Miriam DeLone
Pages: 560
ISBN: 9781337514682
Available:
Release: 2016-12-05
Editor: Cengage Learning
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Comprehensive and balanced, THE COLOR OF JUSTICE: RACE, ETHNICITY, AND CRIME IN AMERICA is the definitive introduction to current research and theories of racial and ethnic discrimination within America's criminal justice system. The sixth edition covers the best and the most recent research on patterns of criminal behavior and victimization, immigration and crime, drug use, police practices, court processing and sentencing, unconscious bias, the death penalty, and correctional programs, giving students the facts and theoretical foundation they need to make their own informed decisions about discrimination within the system. Uniquely unbiased, THE COLOR OF JUSTICE makes every effort to incorporate discussion of all major race groups found in the United States. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.

The Color of Our Shame

The Color of Our Shame
Author: Christopher J. Lebron
Pages: 202
ISBN: 9780199936342
Available:
Release: 2013-10-03
Editor: Oxford University Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

The Color of Our Shame argues that political thought must supply the arguments necessary to address the moral problems that attend racial inequality and make those problems salient to a democratic polity.

At the Limits of Justice

At the Limits of Justice
Author: Suvendrini Perera,Sherene H. Razack
Pages: 619
ISBN: 9781442626003
Available:
Release: 2014
Editor: University of Toronto Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

In At the Limits of Justice, twenty-nine contributors from six countries examine the political, social, and personal repercussions of the war on terror.

Crimes of Colour

Crimes of Colour
Author: Wendy Chan,Kiran Mirchandani
Pages: 221
ISBN: 1551113031
Available:
Release: 2002
Editor: Broadview Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

The essays in this collection explore the link between "race" and "crime" in the Canadian context, examining how individuals are racialized in the legal system, and describing how racialized groups and individuals are criminalized.

The Color of Law A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America

The Color of Law  A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America
Author: Richard Rothstein
Pages: 368
ISBN: 9781631492860
Available:
Release: 2017-05-02
Editor: Liveright Publishing
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

New York Times Bestseller • Notable Book of the Year • Editors' Choice Selection One of Bill Gates’ “Amazing Books” of the Year One of Publishers Weekly’s 10 Best Books of the Year Longlisted for the National Book Award for Nonfiction An NPR Best Book of the Year Winner of the Hillman Prize for Nonfiction Gold Winner • California Book Award (Nonfiction) Finalist • Los Angeles Times Book Prize (History) Finalist • Brooklyn Public Library Literary Prize This “powerful and disturbing history” exposes how American governments deliberately imposed racial segregation on metropolitan areas nationwide (New York Times Book Review). Widely heralded as a “masterful” (Washington Post) and “essential” (Slate) history of the modern American metropolis, Richard Rothstein’s The Color of Law offers “the most forceful argument ever published on how federal, state, and local governments gave rise to and reinforced neighborhood segregation” (William Julius Wilson). Exploding the myth of de facto segregation arising from private prejudice or the unintended consequences of economic forces, Rothstein describes how the American government systematically imposed residential segregation: with undisguised racial zoning; public housing that purposefully segregated previously mixed communities; subsidies for builders to create whites-only suburbs; tax exemptions for institutions that enforced segregation; and support for violent resistance to African Americans in white neighborhoods. A groundbreaking, “virtually indispensable” study that has already transformed our understanding of twentieth-century urban history (Chicago Daily Observer), The Color of Law forces us to face the obligation to remedy our unconstitutional past.

The Color of Mind

The Color of Mind
Author: Derrick Darby,John L. Rury
Pages: 224
ISBN: 9780226525495
Available:
Release: 2018-01-24
Editor: University of Chicago Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

American students vary in educational achievement, but white students in general typically have better test scores and grades than black students. Why is this the case, and what can school leaders do about it? In The Color of Mind, Derrick Darby and John L. Rury answer these pressing questions and show that we cannot make further progress in closing the achievement gap until we understand its racist origins. Telling the story of what they call the Color of Mind—the idea that there are racial differences in intelligence, character, and behavior—they show how philosophers, such as David Hume and Immanuel Kant, and American statesman Thomas Jefferson, contributed to the construction of this pernicious idea, how it influenced the nature of schooling and student achievement, and how voices of dissent such as Frederick Douglass, Frances Ellen Watkins Harper, and W. E. B. Du Bois debunked the Color of Mind and worked to undo its adverse impacts. Rejecting the view that racial differences in educational achievement are a product of innate or cultural differences, Darby and Rury uncover the historical interplay between ideas about race and American schooling, to show clearly that the racial achievement gap has been socially and institutionally constructed. School leaders striving to bring justice and dignity to American schools today must work to root out the systemic manifestations of these ideas within schools, while still doing what they can to mitigate the negative effects of poverty, segregation, inequality, and other external factors that adversely affect student achievement. While we cannot expect schools alone to solve these vexing social problems, we must demand that they address the dignitary injustices associated with how we track, discipline, and deal with special education that reinforce long-standing racist ideas. That is the only way to expel the Color of Mind from schools, close the racial achievement gap, and afford all children the dignity they deserve.

The Oxford Handbook of Ethnicity Crime and Immigration

The Oxford Handbook of Ethnicity  Crime  and Immigration
Author: Sandra M. Bucerius,Michael H. Tonry
Pages: 960
ISBN: 9780199859016
Available:
Release: 2014
Editor: Oxford Handbooks
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

This title provides comprehensive analyses of current knowledge about the unwarranted disparities in dealings with the criminal justice system faced by some disadvantaged minority groups in all developed countries.

Colour Coded

Colour Coded
Author: Constance Backhouse
Pages: 432
ISBN: 9781442690851
Available:
Release: 1999-11-20
Editor: University of Toronto Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Historically Canadians have considered themselves to be more or less free of racial prejudice. Although this conception has been challenged in recent years, it has not been completely dispelled. In Colour-Coded, Constance Backhouse illustrates the tenacious hold that white supremacy had on our legal system in the first half of this century, and underscores the damaging legacy of inequality that continues today. Backhouse presents detailed narratives of six court cases, each giving evidence of blatant racism created and enforced through law. The cases focus on Aboriginal, Inuit, Chinese-Canadian, and African-Canadian individuals, taking us from the criminal prosecution of traditional Aboriginal dance to the trial of members of the 'Ku Klux Klan of Kanada.' From thousands of possibilities, Backhouse has selected studies that constitute central moments in the legal history of race in Canada. Her selection also considers a wide range of legal forums, including administrative rulings by municipal councils, criminal trials before police magistrates, and criminal and civil cases heard by the highest courts in the provinces and by the Supreme Court of Canada. The extensive and detailed documentation presented here leaves no doubt that the Canadian legal system played a dominant role in creating and preserving racial discrimination. A central message of this book is that racism is deeply embedded in Canadian history despite Canada's reputation as a raceless society. Winner of the Joseph Brant Award, presented by the Ontario Historical Society

Racialization Crime and Criminal Justice in Canada

Racialization  Crime  and Criminal Justice in Canada
Author: Wendy Chan,Dorothy Chunn
Pages: 224
ISBN: 9781442605749
Available:
Release: 2014-04-29
Editor: University of Toronto Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Race still matters in Canada, and in the context of crime and criminal justice, it matters a lot. In this book, the authors focus on the ways in which racial minority groups are criminalized, as well as the ways in which the Canadian criminal justice system is racialized. Employing an intersectional analysis, Chan and Chunn explore how the connection between race and crime is further affected by class, gender, and other social relations.The text covers not only conventional topics such as policing, sentencing, and the media, but also neglected areas such as the criminalization of immigration, poverty, and mental illness.

Colour in Mass

Colour in Mass
Author: David Chipperfield Architects,b720 Arquitectos
Pages: 144
ISBN: 9788415391203
Available:
Release: 2012
Editor: ACTAR Publishers
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

ING_17 Flap copy

Queering Urban Justice

Queering Urban Justice
Author: Jinthana Haritaworn,Ghaida Moussa,Syrus Marcus Ware,Gabriela (Rio) Rodriguez
Pages: 240
ISBN: 9781487518653
Available:
Release: 2018-08-08
Editor: University of Toronto Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Queering Urban Justice foregrounds visions of urban justice that are critical of racial and colonial capitalism, and asks: What would it mean to map space in ways that address very real histories of displacement and erasure? What would it mean to regard Queer, Trans, Black, Indigenous, and People of Colour (QTBIPOC) as geographic subjects who model different ways of inhabiting and sharing space? The volume describes city spaces as sites where bodies are exhaustively documented while others barely register as subjects. The editors and contributors interrogate the forces that have allowed QTBIPOC to be imagined as absent from the very spaces they have long invested in. From the violent displacement of poor, disabled, racialized, and sexualized bodies from Toronto’s gay village, to the erasure of queer racialized bodies in the academy, Queering Urban Justice offers new directions to all who are interested in acting on the intersections of social, racial, economic, urban, migrant, and disability justice.

Color Blind Justice

Color Blind Justice
Author: Mark Elliott
Pages: 400
ISBN: 9780199708345
Available:
Release: 2008-11-30
Editor: Oxford University Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Civil War officer, Reconstruction "carpetbagger," best-selling novelist, and relentless champion of equal rights--Albion Tourg?e battled his entire life for racial justice. Now, in this engaging biography, Mark Elliott offers an insightful portrait of a fearless lawyer, jurist, and writer, who fought for equality long after most Americans had abandoned the ideals of Reconstruction. Elliott provides a fascinating account of Tourg?e's life, from his childhood in the Western Reserve region of Ohio (then a hotbed of abolitionism), to his years as a North Carolina judge during Reconstruction, to his memorable role as lead plaintiff's counsel in the landmark Supreme Court case Plessy v. Ferguson. Tourg?e's brief coined the phrase that justice should be "color-blind," and his career was one long campaign to make good on that belief. A redoubtable lawyer and an accomplished jurist, Tourg?e's writings represent a mountain of dissent against the prevailing tide of racial oppression. A poignant and inspiring study in courage and conviction, Color-Blind Justice offers us an unforgettable portrayal of Albion Tourg?e and the principles to which he dedicated his life.

The Skin We re In

The Skin We re In
Author: Desmond Cole
Pages: 320
ISBN: 9780385686341
Available:
Release: 2020-01-09
Editor: Unknown
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

In May 2015, the cover story of Toronto Life magazine shook Canada's largest city to its core. Desmond Cole's "The Skin I'm In" exposed the racist practices of the Toronto police force, detailing the dozens of times Cole had been stopped and interrogated under the controversial practice of carding. The story quickly came to national prominence, went on to win a number of National Magazine Awards and catapulted its author into the public sphere. Cole used his newfound profile to draw insistent, unyielding attention to the injustices faced by Black Canadians on a daily basis- the devastating effects of racist policing; the hopelessness produced by an education system that expects little of its black students and withholds from them the resources they need to succeed more fully; the heartbreak of those vulnerable before the child welfare system and those separated from their families by discriminatory immigration laws. Both Cole's activism and journalism find vibrant expression in his first book, The Skin We're In. Puncturing once and for all the bubble of Canadian smugness and naive assumptions of a post-racial nation, Cole chronicles just one year-2017-in the struggle against racism in this country. It was a year that saw calls for tighter borders when African refugees braved frigid temperatures to cross into Manitoba from the States, racial epithets used by a school board trustee, a six-year-old girl handcuffed at school. It was also a year of solidarity between Indigenous people and people of colour in Canada, a commitment forged in response to sesquicentennial celebrations that ignored the impact of violent conquest and genocide. The year also witnessed the profound personal and professional ramifications of Desmond Cole's unwavering determination to combat injustice. In April, Cole disrupted a Toronto police board meeting by calling for the destruction of all data collected through carding. Following the protest, Cole, a columnist with the Toronto Star, was summoned to a meeting with the paper's opinions editor and was informed that his activism violated company policy. Rather than limit his efforts defending Black lives, Cole chose to sever his relationship with the publication. Then in July, at another TPS meeting, Cole challenged the board publicly, addressing rumours of a police cover-up of the beating of Dafonte Miller by an off-duty police officer and his brother. A beating so brutal that Miller lost one of his eyes, and that went uninvestigated for four months. When Cole refused to leave the meeting until the question was publicly addressed, he was arrested. The image of Cole walking, handcuffed and flanked by officers, out of the meeting fortified the distrust between the city's Black community and its police force. (A trespassing charge against Cole will be challenged in the new year as a violation of his right to freedom of expression.) In a month-by-month chronicle, Cole locates the deep cultural, historical and political roots of each event so that what emerges is a personal, painful and comprehensive picture of entrenched, systemic inequality. Urgent, controversial and unsparingly honest, The Skin We're In is destined to become a vital text for anti-racist and social justice movements in Canada, as well as a potent antidote to the all-too-present complacency of many white Canadians.

Our Skin A First Conversation About Race

Our Skin  A First Conversation About Race
Author: Megan Madison,Jessica Ralli
Pages: 36
ISBN: 9780593383421
Available:
Release: 2021-03-16
Editor: Penguin
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Based on the research that race, gender, consent, and body positivity should be discussed with toddlers on up, this read-aloud board book series offers adults the opportunity to begin important conversations with young children in an informed, safe, and supported way. Developed by experts in the fields of early childhood and activism against injustice, this topic-driven board book offers clear, concrete language and beautiful imagery that young children can grasp and adults can leverage for further discussion. While young children are avid observers and questioners of their world, adults often shut down or postpone conversations on complicated topics because it's hard to know where to begin. Research shows that talking about issues like race and gender from the age of two not only helps children understand what they see, but also increases self-awareness, self-esteem, and allows them to recognize and confront things that are unfair, like discrimination and prejudice. This first book in the series begins the conversation on race, with a supportive approach that considers both the child and the adult. Stunning art accompanies the simple and interactive text, and the backmatter offers additional resources and ideas for extending this discussion.