The Black Campus Movement

The Black Campus Movement
Author: I. Rogers
Pages: 235
ISBN: 9781137016508
Available:
Release: 2012-03-12
Editor: Springer
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

This book provides the first national study of this intense and challenging struggle which disrupted and refashioned institutions in almost every state. It also illuminates the context for one of the most transformative educational movements in American history through a history of black higher education and black student activism before 1965.

The Black Campus Movement

The Black Campus Movement
Author: I. Rogers
Pages: 235
ISBN: 9781137016508
Available:
Release: 2012-03-12
Editor: Springer
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

This book provides the first national study of this intense and challenging struggle which disrupted and refashioned institutions in almost every state. It also illuminates the context for one of the most transformative educational movements in American history through a history of black higher education and black student activism before 1965.

The Black Revolution on Campus

The Black Revolution on Campus
Author: Martha Biondi
Pages: 368
ISBN: 9780520282186
Available:
Release: 2014-03-21
Editor: Univ of California Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Winner of the Wesley-Logan Prize in African Diaspora History from the American Historical Association and the Benjamin Hooks National Book Award for Outstanding Scholarly Work on the American Civil Rights Movement and Its Legacy.

Undermining Racial Justice

Undermining Racial Justice
Author: Matthew Johnson
Pages: 336
ISBN: 9781501748592
Available:
Release: 2020-04-15
Editor: Cornell University Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Over the last sixty years, administrators on college campuses nationwide have responded to black campus activists by making racial inclusion and inequality compatible. This bold argument is at the center of Matthew Johnson's powerful and controversial book. Focusing on the University of Michigan, often a key talking point in national debates about racial justice thanks to the contentious Gratz v. Bollinger 2003 Supreme Court case, Johnson argues that UM leaders incorporated black student dissent selectively into the institution's policies, practices, and values. This strategy was used to prevent activism from disrupting the institutional priorities that campus leaders deemed more important than racial justice. Despite knowing that racial disparities would likely continue, Johnson demonstrates that these administrators improbably saw themselves as champions of racial equity. What Johnson contends in Undermining Racial Justice is not that good intentions resulted in unforeseen negative consequences, but that the people who created and maintained racial inequities at premier institutions of higher education across the United States firmly believed they had good intentions in spite of all the evidence to the contrary. The case of the University of Michigan fits into a broader pattern at elite colleges and universities and is a cautionary tale for all in higher education. As Johnson illustrates, inclusion has always been a secondary priority, and, as a result, the policies of the late 1970s and 1980s ushered in a new and enduring era of racial retrenchment on campuses nationwide.

Black Power on Campus

Black Power on Campus
Author: Joy Ann WIlliamson
Pages: 216
ISBN: 9780252095801
Available:
Release: 2003-06-17
Editor: University of Illinois Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Joy Ann Williamson charts the evolution of black consciousness on predominately white American campuses during the critical period between the mid-1960s and mid-1970s, with the Black student movement at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign serving as an illuminating microcosm of similar movements across the country. Drawing on student publications of the late 1960s and early 1970s, as well as interviews with student activists, former administrators, and faculty, Williamson discusses the emergence of Black Power ideology, what constituted "blackness," and notions of self-advancement versus racial solidarity.

Campus Uprisings

Campus Uprisings
Author: Ty-Ron M.O. Douglas,Kmt G. Shockley,Ivory Toldson
Pages: 329
ISBN: 9780807778456
Available:
Release: 2021
Editor: Teachers College Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

The Chronicle of Higher Education reports that “White supremacist groups are targeting college campuses like never before,” while the appearance of nooses, swastikas, and racial epithets are increasing across the United States. This timely volume presents a wide-range of perspectives to offer readers practical steps and policy options for creating campus structures that are fair and inclusive to students of all races and social statuses. It features chapters from a university president, department chair, a campus chaplain, cultural center directors, faculty, and students—including voices from the University of Missouri and Howard University during their recent series of protests. Campus Uprisings demonstrates the power and value of principled non-violent activism to provoke change and provides thoughtful strategies to help universities manage conflict and racial tension. Book Features: Recommendations drawn from both scholarly analyses focused on practice and reflections from actual practitioners.“Voices from the Field” presents real-time perspectives of activists who are currently working toward societal change. An intergenerational relevance with chapters on the Civil Rights era protests and current movements, such as Me Too and Black Lives Matter. Contributors: James Alford, Noelle Witherspoon Arnold, Lisa Bass, Barbara Boakye, Mahauganee Shaw Bonds, Travis D. Boyce, Winsome M. Chunnu, Lucy Douglas, Ty-Ron M.O. Douglas, Brittany Fatoma, Sydney Freeman Jr., Shaun R. Harper, Brian Heilmeier, Dena Lane-Bonds, Kofi LeNiles, Jonathan A. McElderry, Kelsey Morris, Ransford Pinto, Stephanie Hernandez Rivera, Kmt G. Shockley, Stephanie Shonekan, Ivory A. Toldson, Evan Willis, and Christine Woods

Upending the Ivory Tower

Upending the Ivory Tower
Author: Stefan M. Bradley
Pages: 480
ISBN: 9781479819270
Available:
Release: 2018-09-25
Editor: NYU Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Winner, 2019 Anna Julia Cooper and C.L.R. James Award, given by the National Council for Black Studies The inspiring story of the black students, faculty, and administrators who forever changed America’s leading educational institutions and paved the way for social justice and racial progress The eight elite institutions that comprise the Ivy League, sometimes known as the Ancient Eight—Harvard, Yale, Princeton, Penn, Columbia, Brown, Dartmouth, and Cornell—are American stalwarts that have profoundly influenced history and culture by producing the nation’s and the world’s leaders. The few black students who attended Ivy League schools in the decades following WWII not only went on to greatly influence black America and the nation in general, but unquestionably awakened these most traditional and selective of American spaces. In the twentieth century, black youth were in the vanguard of the black freedom movement and educational reform. Upending the Ivory Tower illuminates how the Black Power movement, which was borne out of an effort to edify the most disfranchised of the black masses, also took root in the hallowed halls of America’s most esteemed institutions of higher education. Between the close of WWII and 1975, the civil rights and Black Power movements transformed the demographics and operation of the Ivy League on and off campus. As desegregators and racial pioneers, black students, staff, and faculty used their status in the black intelligentsia to enhance their predominantly white institutions while advancing black freedom. Although they were often marginalized because of their race and class, the newcomers altered educational policies and inserted blackness into the curricula and culture of the unabashedly exclusive and starkly white schools. This book attempts to complete the narrative of higher education history, while adding a much needed nuance to the history of the Black Power movement. It tells the stories of those students, professors, staff, and administrators who pushed for change at the risk of losing what privilege they had. Putting their status, and sometimes even their lives, in jeopardy, black activists negotiated, protested, and demonstrated to create opportunities for the generations that followed. The enrichments these change agents made endure in the diversity initiatives and activism surrounding issues of race that exist in the modern Ivy League. Upending the Ivory Tower not only informs the civil rights and Black Power movements of the postwar era but also provides critical context for the Black Lives Matter movement that is growing in the streets and on campuses throughout the country today. As higher education continues to be a catalyst for change, there is no one better to inform today’s activists than those who transformed our country’s past and paved the way for its future.

The New Campus Anti Rape Movement

The New Campus Anti Rape Movement
Author: Caroline Heldman,Alissa R. Ackerman,Ian Breckenridge-Jackson
Pages: 230
ISBN: 9781498554022
Available:
Release: 2018-05-29
Editor: Lexington Books
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

This is the first book to examine the new campus anti-rape movement that emerged in 2014. The authors examine the role of new laws and social media in facilitating movement successes.

From Black Power to Black Studies

From Black Power to Black Studies
Author: Fabio Rojas
Pages: 304
ISBN: 9780801899713
Available:
Release: 2010-09-01
Editor: JHU Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Shedding light on the black power movement, Black Studies programs, and American higher education, this historical analysis reveals how radical politics are assimilated into the university system.

The Campus Color Line

The Campus Color Line
Author: Eddie R. Cole
Pages: 376
ISBN: 9780691206752
Available:
Release: 2020-09-29
Editor: Princeton University Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

"A stunning and ambitious origins story."—Ibram X. Kendi, National Book Award–winning and #1 New York Times–bestselling author The remarkable history of how college presidents shaped the struggle for racial equality Some of America’s most pressing civil rights issues—desegregation, equal educational and employment opportunities, housing discrimination, and free speech—have been closely intertwined with higher education institutions. Although it is commonly known that college students and other activists, as well as politicians, actively participated in the fight for and against civil rights in the middle decades of the twentieth century, historical accounts have not adequately focused on the roles that the nation’s college presidents played in the debates concerning racism. Based on archival research conducted at a range of colleges and universities across the United States, The Campus Color Line sheds light on the important place of college presidents in the struggle for racial parity. Focusing on the period between 1948 and 1968, Eddie Cole shows how college presidents, during a time of violence and unrest, strategically, yet often silently, initiated and shaped racial policies and practices inside and outside of the educational sphere. With courage and hope, as well as malice and cruelty, college presidents positioned themselves—sometimes precariously—amid conflicting interests and demands. Black college presidents challenged racist policies as their students demonstrated in the streets against segregation, while presidents of major universities lobbied for urban renewal programs that displaced Black communities near campus. Some presidents amended campus speech practices to accommodate white supremacist speakers, even as other academic leaders developed the nation’s first affirmative action programs in higher education. The Campus Color Line illuminates how the legacy of academic leaders’ actions continues to influence the unfinished struggle for Black freedom and racial equity in education and beyond.

Rebellion in Black and White

Rebellion in Black and White
Author: Robert Cohen,David J. Snyder
Pages: 337
ISBN: 9781421408507
Available:
Release: 2013-05
Editor: JHU Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

SynnottJeffrey A. TurnerErica WhittingtonJoy Ann Williamson-Lott

Harlem vs Columbia University

Harlem vs  Columbia University
Author: Stefan M. Bradley
Pages: 272
ISBN: 9780252090585
Available:
Release: 2010-10-01
Editor: University of Illinois Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

In 1968-69, Columbia University became the site for a collision of American social movements. Black Power, student power, antiwar, New Left, and Civil Rights movements all clashed with local and state politics when an alliance of black students and residents of Harlem and Morningside Heights openly protested the school's ill-conceived plan to build a large, private gymnasium in the small green park that separates the elite university from Harlem. Railing against the university's expansion policy, protesters occupied administration buildings and met violent opposition from both fellow students and the police. In this dynamic book, Stefan M. Bradley describes the impact of Black Power ideology on the Students' Afro-American Society (SAS) at Columbia. While white students--led by Mark Rudd and Students for a Democratic Society (SDS)--sought to radicalize the student body and restructure the university, black students focused on stopping the construction of the gym in Morningside Park. Through separate, militant action, black students and the black community stood up to the power of an Ivy League institution and stopped it from trampling over its relatively poor and powerless neighbors. Bradley also compares the events at Columbia with similar events at Harvard, Cornell, Yale, and the University of Pennsylvania.

Jim Crow Campus

Jim Crow Campus
Author: Joy Ann Williamson-Lott
Pages: 176
ISBN: 9780807759127
Available:
Release: 2018-06-15
Editor: Teachers College Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

"This well-researched volume explores how the Black freedom struggle and the anti-Vietnam War movement dovetailed with faculty and student activism in the South to undermine the traditional role of higher education and bring about social change. It offers a deep understanding of the vital importance of independent institutions during times of national crisis" --

Plantation Politics and Campus Rebellions

Plantation Politics and Campus Rebellions
Author: Bianca C. Williams,Dian D. Squire,Frank A. Tuitt
Pages: 362
ISBN: 9781438482699
Available:
Release: 2021-03-01
Editor: SUNY Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Argues that plantation life, its racialized inequities, and the ongoing struggle against them are embedded in not only the physical structures but also the everyday workings of higher education. Plantation Politics and Campus Rebellions provides a multidisciplinary exploration of the contemporary university’s entanglement with the history of slavery and settler colonialism in the United States. Inspired by more than a hundred student-led protests during the Movement for Black Lives, contributors examine how campus rebellions—and university responses to them—expose the racialized inequities at the core of higher education. Plantation politics are embedded in the everyday workings of universities—in not only the physical structures and spaces of academic institutions, but in its recruitment and attainment strategies, hiring practices, curriculum, and notions of sociality, safety, and community. The book is comprised of three sections that highlight how white supremacy shapes campus communities and classrooms; how current diversity and inclusion initiatives perpetuate inequality; and how students, staff, and faculty practice resistance in the face of institutional and legislative repression. Each chapter interrogates a connection between the academy and the plantation, exploring how Black people and their labor are viewed as simultaneously essential and disruptive to university cultures and economies. The volume is an indispensable read for students, faculty, student affairs professionals, and administrators invested in learning more about how power operates within education and imagining emancipatory futures. Bianca C. Williams is Associate Professor of Anthropology at the Graduate Center, City University of New York and author of The Pursuit of Happiness: Black Women, Diasporic Dreams, and the Politics of Emotional Transnationalism. Dian D. Squire is Assistant Professor of Counseling-Student Affairs at Northern Arizona University. Frank A. Tuitt is Vice President, Chief Diversity Officer, and Professor of Education at the University of Connecticut and coeditor (with Chayla Haynes and Saran Stewart) of Race, Equity, and the Learning Environment: The Global Relevance of Critical and Inclusive Pedagogies in Higher Education.

Campus Wars

Campus Wars
Author: Kenneth J. Heineman
Pages: 366
ISBN: 9780814735121
Available:
Release: 1994-05-01
Editor: NYU Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

In many parts of the African Muslim world, slavery still blights the landscape. What are the origins of this terrible institution? Why is it still practiced? How widespread is it and how does it differ from Western chattel slavery? This book tells the story of how the enslavement of Africans by Berbers, Arabs, and other Africans became institutionalized and legitimized throughout Muslim Africa. A classic, pioneering study, first published in 1971 and extensively updated in this revised edition, Slavery in the History of Black Muslim Africa provides an expansive portrait of domestic slavery from the tenth to the nineteenth century in the context of the religious, social, and economic conditions of the African Islamic world. Drawing on a host of accounts from contemporary observers such as Leo Africanus and Ibn Battuta, Fisher and Fisher describe the status and rights of slaves in Africa, and their various roles as currency, goods, eunuchs, soldiers, and statesmen, as well as the jarring historical interruption brought on by slave raiders and traders in West and North Africa.

Being Black Being Male on Campus

Being Black  Being Male on Campus
Author: Derrick R. Brooms
Pages: 266
ISBN: 9781438463995
Available:
Release: 2016-12-28
Editor: SUNY Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Explores how race and gender matter on campus and how Black males navigate college for academic and personal success. This work marks a radical shift away from the pervasive focus on the challenges that Black male students face and the deficit rhetoric that often limits perspectives about them. Instead, Derrick R. Brooms offers reflective counter-narratives of success. Being Black, Being Male on Campus uses in-depth interviews to investigate the collegiate experiences of Black male students at historically White institutions. Framed through Critical Race Theory and Blackmaleness, the study provides new analysis on the utility and importance of Black Male Initiatives (BMIs). This work explores Black men’s perceptions, identity constructions, and ambitions, while it speaks meaningfully to how race and gender intersect as they influence students’ experiences. “Well written and informative, this exciting project cuts across many of the strengths of previous publications and fills significant theoretical and methodological gaps by focusing on authentically voiced Black men who are finding and making their way in higher education and in life.” — James Earl Davis, coeditor of Educating African American Males: Contexts for Consideration, Possibilities for Practice

Shelter in a Time of Storm

Shelter in a Time of Storm
Author: Jelani M. Favors
Pages: 368
ISBN: 9781469648347
Available:
Release: 2019-02-08
Editor: UNC Press Books
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

For generations, historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs) have been essential institutions for the African American community. Their nurturing environments not only provided educational advancement but also catalyzed the Black freedom struggle, forever altering the political destiny of the United States. In this book, Jelani M. Favors offers a history of HBCUs from the 1837 founding of Cheyney State University to the present, told through the lens of how they fostered student activism. Favors chronicles the development and significance of HBCUs through stories from institutions such as Cheyney State University, Tougaloo College, Bennett College, Alabama State University, Jackson State University, Southern University, and North Carolina A&T. He demonstrates how HBCUs became a refuge during the oppression of the Jim Crow era and illustrates the central role their campus communities played during the civil rights and Black Power movements. Throughout this definitive history of how HBCUs became a vital seedbed for politicians, community leaders, reformers, and activists, Favors emphasizes what he calls an unwritten "second curriculum" at HBCUs, one that offered students a grounding in idealism, racial consciousness, and cultural nationalism.

Rethinking Campus Life

Rethinking Campus Life
Author: Christine A. Ogren,Marc A. VanOverbeke
Pages: 311
ISBN: 9783319756141
Available:
Release: 2018-07-19
Editor: Springer
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

This edited volume explores the history of student life throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Chapter authors examine the expanding reach of scholarship on the history of college students; the history of underrepresented students, including black, Latino, and LGBTQ students; and student life at state normal schools and their successors, regional colleges and universities, and at community colleges and evangelical institutions. The book also includes research on drag and gender and on student labor activism, and offers new interpretations of fraternity and sorority life. Collectively, these chapters deepen scholarly understanding of students, the diversity of their experiences at an array of institutions, and the campus lives they built.

Beyond Education

Beyond Education
Author: Eli Meyerhoff
Pages: 272
ISBN: 9781452960227
Available:
Release: 2019-07-23
Editor: U of Minnesota Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

A bold call to deromanticize education and reframe universities as terrains of struggle between alternative modes of studying and world-making Higher education is at an impasse. Black Lives Matter and #MeToo show that racism and sexism remain pervasive on campus, while student and faculty movements fight to reverse increased tuition, student debt, corporatization, and adjunctification. Commentators typically frame these issues as crises for an otherwise optimal mode of intellectual and professional development. In Beyond Education, Eli Meyerhoff instead sees this impasse as inherent to universities, as sites of intersecting political struggles over resources for studying. Meyerhoff argues that the predominant mode of study, education, is only one among many alternatives and that it must be deromanticized in order to recognize it as a colonial-capitalist institution. He traces how key elements of education—the vertical trajectory of individualized development, its role in preparing people to participate in governance through a pedagogical mode of accounting, and dichotomous figures of educational waste (the “dropout”) and value (the “graduate”)—emerged from histories of struggles in opposition to alternative modes of study bound up with different modes of world-making. Through interviews with participants in contemporary university struggles and embedded research with an anarchist free university, Beyond Education paves new avenues for achieving the aims of an “alter-university” movement to put novel modes of study into practice. Taking inspiration from Black Lives Matter, Occupy Wall Street, and Indigenous resurgence projects, it charts a new course for movements within, against, and beyond the university as we know it.

Student Movements of the 1960s

Student Movements of the 1960s
Author: Alexander Cruden
Pages: 192
ISBN: 9780737766363
Available:
Release: 2012-08-22
Editor: Greenhaven Publishing LLC
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

This fascinating volume explores the historical and cultural events leading up to and following the student movements of the 1960s. Readers will learn about issues surrounding the goals of the activists, black power, feminism, and the role of drugs and music. This book also includes personal narratives from people who experienced the student movements of the 1960s. Essay sources include Lyndon B. Johnson, Kathie Sarachild, Kathryn Jean Lopez, and the U.S. House Committee on Un-American Activities. Personal narratives include a girl's experience of feminism in the sixties, and Mario Savio's tense words about the California students who were facing trial.