Sociolinguistics of literature Nonstandard English in Zadie Smith s White Teeth

Sociolinguistics of literature  Nonstandard English in Zadie Smith s White Teeth
Author: Daniela Wack
Pages: 20
ISBN: 9783638540643
Available:
Release: 2006-09-02
Editor: GRIN Verlag
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Seminar paper from the year 2005 in the subject English Language and Literature Studies - Linguistics, grade: 1,0, University of Freiburg, 20 entries in the bibliography, language: English, abstract: White Teethhas widely been celebrated as one of the best multicultural novels in recent years. The Whitbread judging panel called it a “landmark novel for multicultural Britain, as well as a superb portrait of contemporary London.”. Claire Squires notes that the voicing of different characters and their ethnic group is one of the most apparent feature of White Teeth. From Archie’s bumbling homilies to the “appalling pronunciation” of the customers Samad takes orders from in the restaurant, from Alsana's wacky images to the hybrid street slang of the “Raggastani,” and from Irie’s rising, soap-opera influenced, Antipodean intonation to her accusation that Millat’s Caribbean-toned speech is “not your voice”. You sound ridiculous!” Smith displays a finelytuned ear for linguistic inflections and their sociocultural nuances. This paper takes a look at these “linguistic inflections and their sociocultural nuances” and analyses various varieties of English that are employed in the novel. The main concern, however, is not the description of nonstandard varieties, but the question if these varieties are realistically represented with regard London’s linguistic landscape. In other words, in how far can nonstandard language in fiction be taken as a reliable source for a sociolinguistic analysis? For this purpose, various examples of direct speech as well narrative comments will be compared with real language use. The paper is structured as follows. Starting with a chapter on literary sociolinguistic, I will discuss the conditions and problems that have to be taken into consideration when taking fiction as a source for sociolinguistic research. Then, I will reflect on different approaches in sociolinguistics that are important for the study of nonstandard language that represents ethnic, regional, social and age-related variation. In the major part of this paper, the different nonstandard English varieties that appear inWhite Teeth,such as Cockney, youth language, and Jamaican Creole, as well as language crossing, will be analysed and compared to sociolinguistic studies. The use of Bengali in White Teethhas to be omitted as the study of a language of its own would go beyond the scope of this paper. In my analysis I will also reveal the semiotic and symbolic potential of the literary nonstandard varieties in comparison to their representation in reality.

Dialect in Film and Literature

Dialect in Film and Literature
Author: Jane Hodson
Pages: 272
ISBN: 9781137393937
Available:
Release: 2014-03-31
Editor: Macmillan International Higher Education
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

What is a dialect? How are dialects represented in film and literature? How can they be analysed? In the first textbook to cover dialect representation in both film and literature, Jane Hodson explores why and how different varieties of English are used. In order to link the concepts to actual usage, illustrative examples of popular films, classic novels and poems are discussed throughout the text. Dialect in Film and Literature: • examines the key differences between the handling of dialect in literature and film • draws on recent work in linguistics to examine a range of topics, including metalanguage, identity and authenticity • includes useful teaching resources, such as exercises and suggestions for further reading Written for students of English language and literature, this is a lively introduction to the fascinating field of dialect representation.

The 21st Century Comedy of White Teeth

The 21st Century Comedy of  White Teeth
Author: Joerg Schroeder
Pages: 44
ISBN: 9783656198093
Available:
Release: 2012-05
Editor: GRIN Verlag
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Seminar paper from the year 2012 in the subject English - Literature, Works, grade: 1,7, University of Bremen (English-Speaking Cultures), course: The Transnational Novel, language: English, abstract: The 21st Century Comedy of White Teeth Contents 1. Polyglot Plot 1.1. Flexible omniscient narrator 1.2. Forwarded Reversals 2. Transnational Locations 2.1. Colours of Culture 2.2. Irish Storytelling 2.3. Transcultural Veto 3. Comedy 3.1. Generic Gear 3.2. Comedic Crossings 3.2.1. Mad Mary 3.2.2. Arabian Mickey 3.2.3. Samad & Women 3.3. Male Mockery 3.3.1. Anti-hero Archie 3.3.2. Protagonist Samad 3.3.3. Old School 4. Conclusion 5. Bibliography "It is useless to base any system on a human being." (Henri Bergson. Laughter. 1900) White Teeth is both an ample and intense read as well as a bestselling success after its first publication in 2000. It has found its creative way via television adaptation and a four-hour long theatre play into the school curriculum. In my term paper I will show that White Teeth is a comedy for the 21st century generated through a polyglot plot and transnational locations. Mostly based on the first half of the novel, it is where I could draw up my hypotheses. Archibald Jones' and Samad Iqbal's male friendship is affiliated with society and culture, and therefore useful on reflexion. Their synchronized mid-life crises move towards conflicts exposed in the amusing narrative. Critically user-oriented but limited due to paper-size, I will try to converge to the multilateral scope of new fiction. While researching secondary literature published in the 2000s about postcolonial and transnational corpora many authors claimed superordinate terminology adhered to Zadie Smith's debut novel White Teeth. Nonetheless, serious analytical debates were missing an essential genre making literature enjoyable more than ever. In this term paper, my aim is to prove that Zadie Smith escaped the compelling hassle of both a debut and millennium novel by jocular upda"

The Importance of Mangal Pande to Samad in Zadie Smith s White Teeth

The Importance of Mangal Pande  to Samad  in Zadie Smith s  White Teeth
Author: Florian König
Pages: 19
ISBN: 9783640464906
Available:
Release: 2009-11-05
Editor: GRIN Verlag
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Seminar paper from the year 2008 in the subject English Language and Literature Studies - Literature, grade: 1,3, http://www.uni-jena.de/, course: Black British Literature, language: English, abstract: [...] The main goal of this paper should be an in depth look at the character of the Muslim waiter Samad Iqbal and his fixation upon his antecedent Mangal Pande who allegedly started a revolutionary uprising in India in 1857 and was therefore executed by the British colonial rule. The initial analysis of the topic allowed the perception of an insufficient material concerning the scholarly treatment of Pande's function in White Teeth. Therefore, his representation through the characters perceptions and his role in the novel will be analysed. The initial point of such research refers to key elements of motifs and narrative structure Smith's; namely an issue of belonging and integration, the significance of (both personal and collective) history and one's roots. At first, the clear historical background, just as the role and significance of objective history, i.e. historic facts, would be analysed. Subsequently, I will discuss the role Mangal Pande plays in Samad's life and the significance history plays for him. Following this discussion, I will try to answer the question how other characters think and feel about Mangal Pande. In a concluding chapter, I will try to determine what the importance of this 'factual' predecessor to Samad is and discuss the importance of history, family backgrounds and cultural legacies for immigrants who are stuck in a crisis of identity in their new ‘homeland.’

Zadie Smith White Teeth and Multiculturalism

Zadie Smith   White Teeth and Multiculturalism
Author: Sylvia Hadjetian
Pages: 32
ISBN: 9783638802253
Available:
Release: 2007-09-30
Editor: GRIN Verlag
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Seminar paper from the year 2002 in the subject English Language and Literature Studies - Literature, grade: 1,3, University of London (English Department), course: Contemporary London in Literature, language: English, abstract: Zadie Smith, having a Jamaican mother and an English father, just wanted to write a funny book in which not everybody is white, she did not think much about multiculturalism in London because it is nothing to talk about, it is normal. However, the book became one of the best novels dealing with multiculturalism. A multicultural society consists of two or more different cultures which are different in language, religion, traditions and their systems of values. Britain and especially London became multicultural mainly by immigrants who left their countries mostly for political, demographic or economical reasons in the search for freedom and a better standard of living. Some so-called push- factors are political suppression, bad working conditions or natural disasters. Pull- factors are religious and political freedom and better jobs and chances to learn some money, for example. Britain itself encouraged people from overpopulated and underemployed Commonwealth countries to immigrate because it needed cheap workers to staff the semi-skilled and non-skilled vacancies and to rebuild the war-shattered economy. Most of the immigrants worked in the National Health Service, public transport or in the manufacturing service. Many of them got only low-paid manual jobs and became victims of discriminatory practices. These immigrants started the transformation of Britain and especially of London into a multicultural society. White Teeth is the story of three families from three different cultural backgrounds, the English-Jamaican Jones, the Bangladeshi Iqbals and the Jewish Chalfens, told mainly between 1974 and 1992, set in Willesden, a multicultural suburb in North London, where Zadie Smith herself lives. The novel is told in the tones and structures of

Multiculturalism in Zadie Smith s White Teeth

Multiculturalism in Zadie Smith s  White Teeth
Author: Cesare Siglarski
Pages: 19
ISBN: 9783668238602
Available:
Release: 2016-06-09
Editor: GRIN Verlag
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Seminar paper from the year 2014 in the subject English Language and Literature Studies - Literature, grade: 1,0, University of Duisburg-Essen (British and Anglophone Literature and Culture), course: Survey of British Literature, language: English, abstract: In the following, this seminar paper will focus on transculturality by mainly referring to Homi K. Bhabha's “concept of hybridity and what he calls the third space” (Bentley 20008: 20) which Bhabha developed in contrast to multiculturalism (cf. Sommer 2001: 50). Furthermore, “Stuart Hall's concept of new ethnicities” (Bentley 2008: 20), which deals with “the historical development of racial politics” (ibid.: 21), will be outlined. In the following character analysis, with regard to Bhabha's third space, this seminar paper will examine whether Samad Iqbal and Irie Jones are able to create such a third space or not.

Zadie Smith White Teeth The Families

Zadie Smith     White Teeth      The Families
Author: Nicole Fürch
Pages: 10
ISBN: 9783640441938
Available:
Release: 2009-10-09
Editor: GRIN Verlag
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Seminar paper from the year 2006 in the subject English - Literature, Works, grade: 2,5, Otto-von-Guericke-University Magdeburg (Institut für Anglistik), language: English, abstract: When you start a course in a new semester you have different expectations what to deal with in this course. In sports it is obvious practicing the kind of sport you have chosen. But in English most expectations are different because you have never heard of some topics in your life before. The course “Black British Writing” with Mrs. Bartels fulfilled my expectations surprisingly because we dealt with different British authors whose origins are in southern countries and who live in Great Britain, now. The main part of this course was taken up by the novel White Teeth by Zadie Smith. Therefore it seems appropriate writing an essay about this book. Of course, it is not possible to write ten pages about the whole book, but to concentrate on one important aspect. The aspect I will concentrate on is the introduction and analysis of the members of the three families dominating the novel. The families presented in the novel are not the kind of family I know in real life. Their attitudes towards life differ from ideologies like in Germany which is worth being analysed and that opens new vistas.

The Cambridge Introduction to Modern British Fiction 1950 2000

The Cambridge Introduction to Modern British Fiction  1950 2000
Author: Dominic Head
Pages: 307
ISBN: 0521669669
Available:
Release: 2002-03-07
Editor: Cambridge University Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

The most current, wide-ranging, and accessible introduction on the post-war novel in Britain available.

Metaphors and Symbols

Metaphors and Symbols
Author: Ina-Eleftheria Sachariadis
Pages: 44
ISBN: 9783656084907
Available:
Release: 2011-12
Editor: GRIN Verlag
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Seminar paper from the year 2006 in the subject American Studies - Culture and Applied Geography, grade: 1,7, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (Institut fur Anglistik, Amerikanistik und Anglophonie), course: Hauptseminar "New Eden, Paradise, The White Whale and Marilyn Monroe: Cultural Symbols and Icons in American Literature," 25 entries in the bibliography, language: English, abstract: This paper firstly treats the issue of metaphor and then proceeds with the discussion of the term symbol. To ensure consistency, the presentation of both terms follows the same structure: First of all the definition and etymology of each term is given; their principal characteristics are mentioned and explicated. Additionally the related concept of "similes" is defined and compared to metaphors. Due to the fact that the definitions of the term "metaphor" vary depending on the theories they are based on, a supplementary outline of these theories is required. Subsequently the terms are classified into categories in order to allow a more detailed analysis; examples are cited. The paper ends with a comparison of the two concepts."

Identity in Zadie Smith s White Teeth and Hanif Kureishi s My Beautiful Laundrette

Identity in Zadie Smith s White Teeth and Hanif Kureishi s My Beautiful Laundrette
Author: Elisabeth Werdermann
Pages: 80
ISBN: 9783640922383
Available:
Release: 2011-06
Editor: GRIN Verlag
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Bachelor Thesis from the year 2011 in the subject English Language and Literature Studies - Literature, grade: 1,3, University of Paderborn (Institut fur Kulturwissenschaften), language: English, abstract: Who am I? What makes me me? These are questions of daily importance to every individual human being. The question of what defines us in our per-sonality cannot be answered in a single sentence, or easily. Multiple external factors from the field of culture such as ethnicity, race, class, gender, sexual orientation or history impinge on who we are, what we identify ourselves or are identified with. According to the Oxford English Dictionary, identity defines "Who or what a person or thing is; a distinct impression of a single person or thing presented to or perceived by others; a set of char-acteristics or a description that distinguishes a person from others." Depending on a person's social surroundings with all its cultural identifiers, his or her identity is shaped. In Zadie Smith's novel White Teeth and Hanif Kureishi's screenplay My Beautiful Laundrette identity is presented and problematised as "In-betweenness" . Both works focus on immigrants and their children, the se-cond generation, and the difficulties they face in their daily life caused by in-betweenness. In-betweenness as a term is quite self-explanatory and depicts ambiguity on several levels like belonging, ethnicity or sexual orientation/ habits, to name only a few. This ambiguity entails the social life of the characters as well as their emotional state. In the context of belonging, it is Cherry, from My Beautiful Laundrette, who first brings the term "in-betweenness" up: Oh God, I'm so sick of hearing about these in-betweens. People should make up their minds where they are. (Kureishi, p. 37) By this, she labels the subliminal topic of both literary works. With In-betweenness as a special form of identity, this research paper searches for reasons and circumstances, which make the chara

English as a Local Language

English as a Local Language
Author: Christina Higgins
Pages: 176
ISBN: 9781847696939
Available:
Release: 2009-07-08
Editor: Multilingual Matters
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

When analyzed in multilingual contexts, English is often treated as an entity that is separable from its linguistic environment. It is often the case, however, that multilinguals use English in hybrid and transcultural ways. This book explores how multilingual East Africans make use of English as a local resource in their everyday practices by examining a range of domains, including workplace conversation, beauty pageants, hip hop and advertising. Drawing on the Bakhtinian concept of multivocality, the author uses discourse analysis and ethnographic approaches to demonstrate the range of linguistic and cultural hybridity found across these domains, and to consider the constraints on hybridity in each context. By focusing on the cultural and linguistic bricolage in which English is often found, the book illustrates how multilinguals respond to the tension between local identification and dominant conceptualizations of English as a language for global communication.

Zadie Smith s White Teeth Identity Construction between Historical Roots and Transcultural Hybridity

Zadie Smith s White Teeth  Identity Construction between Historical Roots and Transcultural Hybridity
Author: Natalie Lewis
Pages: 18
ISBN: 9783638507554
Available:
Release: 2006-06-02
Editor: GRIN Verlag
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Seminar paper from the year 2004 in the subject English Language and Literature Studies - Literature, grade: 1,0, Free University of Berlin, course: Writing the City: Representations of London, 10 entries in the bibliography, language: English, abstract: In 1997, Zadie Smith, a young talented graduate from Cambridge, set out to write a novel about a simple white working-class Londoner who lives a good life throughout the 20th century by accident. Three years later, the author published her fictional debut,White Teeth, which gives its readers a panoramatic view of multicultural British society. The plot evolves around three families of different ethnic origins living in north-western London. In contrast to other initial works of contemporary Black British novelists, Zadie Smith’s first novel is not the usual account of Black youth experience in Britain written from an autobiographical perspective. On more than 500 pages, the Anglo-Jamaican author explores a wide range of themes such as Second World War experiences, first-generation migrant life in the diaspora, recent British youth culture, intergenerational family conflicts, radical religious fanatism and biogenetical engineering. Despite its numerous discourses, diverse characters and multiple time-layers, all of the novel’s addressed issues center around the problem of the individual person forming an authentic identity in a multicultural society and the establishment of a new national identity in postcolonial Britain. Zadie Smith explores the characters’ identity conflicts before the background of their family history. However, while genetic inheritance, cultural origins and prehistory seem to play an important part in the individual’s development, chance and personal choice are deceisive factors which have the potential to overrule any apparently predetermined life path. History and fate are constantly intermingled throughout the narrative, which is at the same time a migrant novel, bildungsroman and family saga.

Attitudes towards Glasgow speech

Attitudes towards Glasgow speech
Author: David Ronneburg
Pages: 39
ISBN: 9783638429009
Available:
Release: 2005-10-17
Editor: GRIN Verlag
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Seminar paper from the year 2000 in the subject English Language and Literature Studies - Linguistics, grade: 1,0, University of Leipzig (Anglistik), course: Sociolinguistics, 20 entries in the bibliography, language: English, abstract: Diese in englischer Sprache abgefasste Arbeit befasst sich auf der Grundlage einer vom Verfasser selbst vorgenommenen kleinen empirischen Erhebung mit den Einstellungen von Glasgowern der Mittelschicht gegenüber Glasgow speech als einer Variante des Englischen.

Grammar Meaning and Concepts

Grammar  Meaning  and Concepts
Author: Susan Strauss,Parastou Feiz,Xuehua Xiang
Pages: 478
ISBN: 9781317665045
Available:
Release: 2018-05-10
Editor: Routledge
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Grammar, Meaning, and Concepts: A Discourse-Based Approach to English Grammar is a book for language teachers and learners that focuses on the meanings of grammatical constructions within discourse, rather than on language as structure governed by rigid rules. This text emphasizes the ways in which users of language construct meaning, express viewpoints, and depict imageries using the conceptual, meaning-filled categories that underlie all of grammar. Written by a team of authors with years of experience teaching grammar to future teachers of English, this book puts grammar in the context of real language and illustrates grammar in use through an abundance of authentic data examples. Each chapter also provides a variety of activities that focus on grammar, genre, discourse, and meaning, which can be used as they are or can be adapted for classroom practice. The activities are also designed to raise awareness about discourse, grammar, and meaning in all facets of everyday life, and can be used as springboards for upper high school, undergraduate, and graduate level research projects and inquiry-based grammatical analysis. Grammar, Meaning, and Concepts is an ideal textbook for those in the areas of teacher education, discourse analysis, applied linguistics, second language teaching, ESL, EFL, and communications who are looking to teach and learn grammar from a dynamic perspective.

Theories for Explaining Linguistic Behaviour in Gender Interaction

Theories for Explaining Linguistic Behaviour in Gender Interaction
Author: Jan H. Hauptmann
Pages: 16
ISBN: 9783640215263
Available:
Release: 2008-11-19
Editor: GRIN Verlag
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Essay from the year 2006 in the subject English Language and Literature Studies - Linguistics, grade: 1,3, Queen's University Belfast (School of English), course: Sociolinguistics, 10 entries in the bibliography, language: English, abstract: Already in the 1960s and 70s have feminist linguistics started to examine language on the basis of gender questions. Numerous works focused on the problem whether women are discriminated through a more powerful "male" language use and how sexist language might be avoided. Within the subject, several different theories arose. This essay will at first demonstrate the development process of two main theories dealing with gender and language (the so called dominance and the difference-theory) and afterwards assess their adequacy in explaining linguistic behaviour in gender interaction. In 1973, Robin LAKOFF, a feminist linguist at the University of California, laid the foundations for a methodical and academic research on the subject of women's language. Her most important works Language and Woman's Place and Women's Language threw light upon the possibility of discrimination through language use. A very important example for such a case might be LAKOFF's observation of the way how women see themselves and which role they are holding within the American society. Thus, LAKOFF does not only examine the specific language used by women, but also the language used about women . Since language is guided by our thoughts, she considers it to be a mirror of the speaker's subconsciousness . In order to investigate this phenomenon more closely, LAKOFF scrutinized her own expressions as well as expressions of friends and acquaintances. Furthermore, she analysed conversations in the television programme. As the field of this small study was very restricted, no universality is claimed for its results, but as an outcome, several criteria are established that are seen as typical for women's language. These standards are as follows:

Code switching

Code switching
Author: Penelope Gardner-Chloros
Pages: 242
ISBN: 9780521862646
Available:
Release: 2009-06-25
Editor: Cambridge University Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

An interdisciplinary overview of code-switching, whereby bilingual speakers switch between different languages or language varieties.

How Novels Work

How Novels Work
Author: John Mullan
Pages: 368
ISBN: 9780191622922
Available:
Release: 2008-02-14
Editor: OUP Oxford
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Never has contemporary fiction been more widely discussed and passionately analysed; recent years have seen a huge growth in the number of reading groups and in the interest of a non-academic readership in the discussion of how novels work. Drawing on his weekly Guardian column, 'Elements of Fiction', John Mullan examines novels mostly of the last ten years, many of which have become firm favourites with reading groups. He reveals the rich resources of novelistic technique, setting recent fiction alongside classics of the past. Nick Hornby's adoption of a female narrator is compared to Daniel Defoe's; Ian McEwan's use of weather is set against Austen's and Hardy's; Carole Shield's chapter divisions are likened to Fanny Burney's. Each section shows how some basic element of fiction is used. Some topics (like plot, dialogue, or location) will appear familiar to most novel readers; others (metanarrative, prolepsis, amplification) will open readers' eyes to new ways of understanding and appreciating the writer's craft. How Novels Work explains how the pleasures of novel reading often come from the formal ingenuity of the novelist. It is an entertaining and stimulating exploration of that ingenuity. Addressed to anyone who is interested in the close reading of fiction, it makes visible techniques and effects we are often only half-aware of as we read. It shows that literary criticism is something that all fiction enthusiasts can do. Contemporary novels discussed include: Monica Ali's Brick Lane; Martin Amis's Money; Margaret Atwood's The Blind Assassin; A.S. Byatt's Possession; Jonathan Coe's The Rotters' Club; J.M. Coetzee's Disgrace; Michael Cunningham's The Hours; Don DeLillo's Underworld; Michel Faber's The Crimson Petal and the White; Ian Fleming's From Russia with Love; Jonathan Franzen's The Corrections; Mark Haddon's The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time; Patricia Highsmith's Ripley under Ground; Alan Hollinghurst's The Spell; Nick Hornby's How to Be Good; Ian McEwan's Atonement; John le Carré's The Constant Gardener; Andrea Levy's Small Island; David Mitchell's Cloud Atlas; Andrew O'Hagan's Personality; Orhan Pamuk's My Name Is Red; Ann Patchett's Bel Canto; Ruth Rendell's Adam and Eve and Pinch Me; Philip Roth's The Human Stain; Jonathan Safran Foer's Everything Is Illuminated; Carol Shields's Unless; Zadie Smith's White Teeth; Muriel Spark's Aiding and Abetting; Graham Swift's Last Orders; Donna Tartt's The Secret History; William Trevor's The Hill Bachelors; and Richard Yates's Revolutionary Road .

The Spread of English in the World

The Spread of English in the World
Author: Eva-Maria Kaufmann
Pages: 17
ISBN: 9783656432609
Available:
Release: 2013-05-31
Editor: GRIN Verlag
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Essay from the year 2011 in the subject English Language and Literature Studies - Linguistics, grade: Distinction, University of Newcastle upon Tyne (EDUCATION COMMUNICATIONS AND LANGUAGE SCIENCES), course: Sociolinguistics, language: English, abstract: The massive increase of English speakers around the world who speak it at all different levels of proficiency, for any variety of purposes and with (other) non-native speakers has sparked some concerns and controversies. Some are concerned that its wide spread and the emergence and institutionalisation of new ‘Englishes’ will lead to a language fragmentation that could ultimately result in mutual unintelligibility. The question of who holds authority over English today is causing heated discussions. Teaching practices for English as a foreign language are yet another contentious subject. For the most part, English teaching is still oriented towards British or North American varieties, and a learner’s proficiency is measured in relation to those norms. Some, however, demand that English teaching practices take into account that usage situations and requirements for English have changed, and that teachers prepare students for international communication rather than communication with Americans or British. The issue with perhaps the greatest political significance is that of linguistic imperialism. As English, particularly the ‘prestige varieties’ British and American, are being taught to more and more people across the world, some have voiced their concern that this “compromises the cultural integrity of the non-native speaker”. There is a fear that English might suppress or even replace local languages and be used as a tool to spread Anglo-American cultural hegemony. This essay gives first a rough overview over who speaks English in the world today. It then briefly discusses some of the attempts by scholars to categorise this immense number of ddifferent people, focusing particularly on Kachru’s model of the spread of English. It addresses some of the factors that lead to the emergence of new varieties of English, describing Nigerian English and China English in more detail by way of an example. Linguistic imperialism is discussed subsequently as one particularly controversial issue relating to the rise of English to one of the world’s most predominant languages.

Constructing the convincing political speech

Constructing the convincing political speech
Author: Claudia Effenberger
Pages: 42
ISBN: 9783640212231
Available:
Release: 2008-11-17
Editor: GRIN Verlag
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Seminar paper from the year 2006 in the subject English Language and Literature Studies - Linguistics, grade: 1,0, University of Cologne (Englisches Seminar), course: Sociolinguistics, 8 entries in the bibliography, language: English, abstract: If today one thinks of politics, politicians and their language there is one opinion that always comes first: All politicians are liars They are smooth-talkers who promise things they cannot fulfil only to get more votes in the coming-up election and they use beautiful words to paraphrase and disguise social injustices. And in some points this opinion is right. There really is a specific political language used by the politicians to follow certain aims but this has not always to be disguise or circumscription. What many of the citizens simply ignore is the fact, that politicians are dependent from the mass. Without the public there would be no need for politicians. And the same goes for political discussions. Politicians don’t argue with each other because they like it. It is always the fact that a political actor starts political relations with another actor and at the same time with the public. If two politicians talk to each other on the television this is always orchestrated for the people who watch the show. (see Dieckmann 1981: 265) The main reason for every politician to lie or to use special vocabulary is for the purpose of being convincing. This paper analyses the language used by politicians in certain situations to convince people of the correctness of their point of view, in its’ roots, mainly based on the book Politically Speaking: The Pragmatic analysis of Political Language by John Wilson. The main focus of this paper is put to the question of the use of the pronominal forms ́I` and ́we` in political talk, under which conditions the one is used and when the other and what for. It is not arguable that politicians always have a reason for using ́I` or ́we` in different contexts, especially in written speeches that are planned and very well prepared. Also the difference between scripted and unscripted speeches will be touched in this paper. To employ the theoretical basis that is provided here, in the last section the famous “Sportpalast”-speech of Joseph Goebbels from 1943 will be analysed with regard to the use of different pronominal forms. The final summary shall bundle the gained information to a logical minimum and draw some conclusions from it. It will show if political use of speech is intentionally manipulating and disguising facts, especially in the example of Goebbels or if the use of language in politics does not differ in great parts from the day-to-day use at home.

A Survey of Modern English

A Survey of Modern English
Author: Stephan Gramley,Kurt-Michael Pätzold
Pages: 397
ISBN: 9780415300353
Available:
Release: 2004
Editor: Psychology Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

This comprehensive and systematic review of modern English presents a description of both the linguistic structure of present-day English and its geographical, social, gender and ethnic variations.