Religion and the American Nation

Religion and the American Nation
Author: John Frederick Wilson
Pages: 104
ISBN: 082032289X
Available:
Release: 2003
Editor: University of Georgia Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

This lively survey ranges across several centuries of change in the ways historians have thought and written about religion in America. In particular, John F. Wilson is concerned with how historians have perceived religion's relationship to the political organization of our country. He begins by establishing the genesis of religion as a specialized area of American history in the nineteenth century, and then discusses religious history's development through the early 1970s. Along the way he considers topics ranging from the "long shadow" the Puritans have cast over our comprehension of religion in American history to the ascendancy of such institutions as the University of Chicago as systematizing forces in religious scholarship. Wilson then discusses how scholars, since the early 1970s, have sought to ground their accounts of American religious trends and events in ways that either avoid or transcend references to Puritanism. The rise of comparative religious histories, Wilson notes, has been the welcome outcome. Moving into the present, Wilson explores a range of behaviors, if not beliefs, that might be understood as religious aspects of American life, and looks at how the spiritual or religious dimensions of American cultural life have been expressed in gnosticism, the mass media, and consumerism. One commentator, Wilson notes, suggested that there are no longer any religions as such in America today, but only religious "brands." Wilson himself sees America as a place where there is room for Old World traditions and new spiritual initiatives, a modern nation remarkably hospitable to ancient preoccupations.

Was America Founded as a Christian Nation

Was America Founded as a Christian Nation
Author: John Fea
Pages: 304
ISBN: 9781611640885
Available:
Release: 2011-02-16
Editor: Westminster John Knox Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Fea offers an even-handed primer on whether America was founded to be a Christian nation, as many evangelicals assert, or a secular state, as others contend. He approaches the title's question from a historical perspective, helping readers see past the emotional rhetoric of today to the recorded facts of our past. Readers on both sides of the issues will appreciate that this book occupies a middle ground, noting the good points and the less-nuanced arguments of both sides and leading us always back to the primary sources that our shared American history comprises.

Conceived in Doubt

Conceived in Doubt
Author: Amanda Porterfield
Pages: 252
ISBN: 9780226675121
Available:
Release: 2012-04-23
Editor: University of Chicago Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Americans have long acknowledged a deep connection between evangelical religion and democracy in the early days of the republic. This is a widely accepted narrative that is maintained as a matter of fact and tradition—and in spite of evangelicalism’s more authoritarian and reactionary aspects. In Conceived in Doubt, Amanda Porterfield challenges this standard interpretation of evangelicalism’s relation to democracy and describes the intertwined relationship between religion and partisan politics that emerged in the formative era of the early republic. In the 1790s, religious doubt became common in the young republic as the culture shifted from mere skepticism toward darker expressions of suspicion and fear. But by the end of that decade, Porterfield shows, economic instability, disruption of traditional forms of community, rampant ambition, and greed for land worked to undermine heady optimism about American political and religious independence. Evangelicals managed and manipulated doubt, reaching out to disenfranchised citizens as well as to those seeking political influence, blaming religious skeptics for immorality and social distress, and demanding affirmation of biblical authority as the foundation of the new American national identity. As the fledgling nation took shape, evangelicals organized aggressively, exploiting the fissures of partisan politics by offering a coherent hierarchy in which God was king and governance righteous. By laying out this narrative, Porterfield demolishes the idea that evangelical growth in the early republic was the cheerful product of enthusiasm for democracy, and she creates for us a very different narrative of influence and ideals in the young republic.

Religion in American Life

Religion in American Life
Author: Jon Butler,Grant Wacker,Randall Balmer
Pages: 532
ISBN: 9780199832699
Available:
Release: 2011-10-07
Editor: Oxford University Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

"Quite ambitious, tracing religion in the United States from European colonization up to the 21st century.... The writing is strong throughout."--Publishers Weekly (starred review)"One can hardly do better than Religion in American Life.... A good read, especially for the uninitiated. The initiated might also read it for its felicity of narrative and the moments of illumination that fine scholars can inject even into stories we have all heard before. Read it."--Church HistoryThis new edition of Religion in American Life, written by three of the country's most eminent historians of religion, offers a superb overview that spans four centuries, illuminating the rich spiritual heritage central to nearly every event in our nation's history. Beginning with the state of religious affairs in both the Old and New Worlds on the eve of colonization and continuing through to the present, the book covers all the major American religious groups, from Protestants, Jews, and Catholics to Muslims, Hindus, Mormons, Buddhists, and New Age believers. Revised and updated, the book includes expanded treatment of religion during the Great Depression, of the religious influences on the civil rights movement, and of utopian groups in the 19th century, and it now covers the role of religion during the 2008 presidential election, observing how completely religion has entered American politics.

Conceived in Doubt

Conceived in Doubt
Author: Amanda Porterfield
Pages: 264
ISBN: 9780226675145
Available:
Release: 2012-04-02
Editor: University of Chicago Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Americans have long acknowledged a deep connection between evangelical religion and democracy in the early days of the republic. This is a widely accepted narrative that is maintained as a matter of fact and tradition—and in spite of evangelicalism’s more authoritarian and reactionary aspects. In Conceived in Doubt, Amanda Porterfield challenges this standard interpretation of evangelicalism’s relation to democracy and describes the intertwined relationship between religion and partisan politics that emerged in the formative era of the early republic. In the 1790s, religious doubt became common in the young republic as the culture shifted from mere skepticism toward darker expressions of suspicion and fear. But by the end of that decade, Porterfield shows, economic instability, disruption of traditional forms of community, rampant ambition, and greed for land worked to undermine heady optimism about American political and religious independence. Evangelicals managed and manipulated doubt, reaching out to disenfranchised citizens as well as to those seeking political influence, blaming religious skeptics for immorality and social distress, and demanding affirmation of biblical authority as the foundation of the new American national identity. As the fledgling nation took shape, evangelicals organized aggressively, exploiting the fissures of partisan politics by offering a coherent hierarchy in which God was king and governance righteous. By laying out this narrative, Porterfield demolishes the idea that evangelical growth in the early republic was the cheerful product of enthusiasm for democracy, and she creates for us a very different narrative of influence and ideals in the young republic.

Bad Religion

Bad Religion
Author: Ross Douthat
Pages: 352
ISBN: 9781439178331
Available:
Release: 2013-04-16
Editor: Simon and Schuster
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Traces the decline of Christianity in America since the 1950s, posing controversial arguments about the role of heresy in the nation's downfall while calling for a revival of traditional Christian practices.

A New Religious America

A New Religious America
Author: Diana L. Eck
Pages: 432
ISBN: 9780061750281
Available:
Release: 2009-03-17
Editor: Harper Collins
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Why Understanding America's Religious Landscape Is the Most Important Challenge Facing Us Today The 1990s saw the U.S. Navy commission its first Muslim chaplain and open its first mosque. There are presently more than three hundred temples in Los Angeles, home to the greatest variety of Buddhists in the world. There are more American Muslims than there are American Episcopalians, Jews, or Presbyterians.

One Nation Under God

One Nation Under God
Author: Marjorie Garber,Rebecca Walkowitz
Pages: 324
ISBN: 9781135207854
Available:
Release: 2013-09-13
Editor: Routledge
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

One Nation Under God? is a remarkable consideration of how religion manifests itself in America today.

The Origins of American Religious Nationalism

The Origins of American Religious Nationalism
Author: Sam Haselby
Pages: 352
ISBN: 9780190266509
Available:
Release: 2016-12-01
Editor: Oxford University Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Sam Haselby offers a new and persuasive account of the role of religion in the formation of American nationality, showing how a contest within Protestantism reshaped American political culture and led to the creation of an enduring religious nationalism. Following U.S. independence, the new republic faced vital challenges, including a vast and unique continental colonization project undertaken without, in the centuries-old European senses of the terms, either "a church" or "a state." Amid this crisis, two distinct Protestant movements arose: a popular and rambunctious frontier revivalism; and a nationalist, corporate missionary movement dominated by Northeastern elites. The former heralded the birth of popular American Protestantism, while the latter marked the advent of systematic Protestant missionary activity in the West. The explosive economic and territorial growth in the early American republic, and the complexity of its political life, gave both movements opportunities for innovation and influence. This book explores the competition between them in relation to major contemporary developments-political democratization, large-scale immigration and unruly migration, fears of political disintegration, the rise of American capitalism and American slavery, and the need to nationalize the frontier. Haselby traces these developments from before the American Revolution to the rise of Andrew Jackson. His approach illuminates important changes in American history, including the decline of religious distinctions and the rise of racial ones, how and why "Indian removal" happened when it did, and with Andrew Jackson, the appearance of the first full-blown expression of American religious nationalism.

Religion and American Exceptionalism

Religion and American Exceptionalism
Author: Dennis Hoover
Pages: 96
ISBN: 9781000155600
Available:
Release: 2020-06-30
Editor: Routledge
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

"American exceptionalism" was once a rather obscure and academic concept, but in the 2012 presidential election campaign the phrase attained unprecedented significance in political rhetoric. President Obama’s conservative critics—most notably Sarah Palin, Newt Gingrich, and Mitt Romney—accused the president of disbelieving in American exceptionalism and thereby offending the nation’s civil religion. This creed traditionally has included the notion that America is a political "new Israel" called by God and guided by His Providence to be the exemplar, vanguard, and champion of liberal democracy and the free market for all humanity. The newly politicized narrative of exceptionalism portrayed Obama as a president embarrassed by his own country and intent on remaking the United States in the image of the secularist and socialist countries of Europe. This book takes a step back from the partisan rhetorical bluster and examines afresh the historical and analytical meanings of American exceptionalism, and the extent to which religion—both "real" religion and the more ambiguous "civil" religion—has shaped these meanings and their uses/abuses. This book was published as a special issue of The Review of Faith and International Affairs.

Inventing American Religion

Inventing American Religion
Author: Robert Wuthnow
Pages: 247
ISBN: 9780190258900
Available:
Release: 2015
Editor: Oxford University Press, USA
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Today, a billion-dollar-a-year polling industry floods the media with information. Pollsters tell us not only which political candidates will win, but how we are practicing our faith. How many Americans went to church last week? Have they been born again? Is Jesus as popular as Harry Potter? Polls tell us that 40 percent of Americans attend religious services each week. They show that African Americans are no more religious than white Americans, and that Jews are abandoning their religion in record numbers. According to leading sociologist Robert Wuthnow, none of that is correct. Pollsters say that attendance at religious services has been constant for decades. But during that time response rates in polls have plummeted, robotic "push poll" calls have proliferated, and sampling has become more difficult. The accuracy of political polling can be known because elections actually happen. But there are no election results to show if the proportion of people who say they pray every day or attend services every week is correct. A large majority of the public doubts that polls can be trusted, and yet night after night on TV, polls experts sum up the nation's habits to an eager audience of millions. Inventing American Religion offers a provocative new argument about the influence of polls in contemporary American society. Wuthnow contends that polls and surveys have shaped-and distorted-how religion is understood and portrayed in the media and also by religious leaders, practitioners, and scholars. He calls for a robust public discussion about American religion that extends well beyond the information provided by polls and surveys, and suggests practical steps to facilitate such a discussion, including changes in how the results of polls and surveys are presented.

Congressional Record

Congressional Record
Author: United States. Congress
Pages: 329
ISBN: OSU:32437123600757
Available:
Release: 2012
Editor: Unknown
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

One Nation Under God

One Nation Under God
Author: Kevin Kruse,M Kruse
Pages: 384
ISBN: 9780465040643
Available:
Release: 2015-04-14
Editor: Basic Books
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Conventional wisdom holds that America has been a Christian nation since the Founding Fathers. But in One Nation Under God, historian Kevin M. Kruse argues that the idea of “Christian America” is nothing more than a myth—and a relatively recent one at that. The assumption that America was, is, and always will be a Christian nation dates back no further than the 1930s, when a coalition of businessmen and religious leaders united in opposition to the FDR’s New Deal. With the full support of Dwight Eisenhower in the 1950s, these activists—the forerunners of the Religious Right—propelled religion into the public sphere. Church membership skyrocketed; Congress added the phrase “under God” to the Pledge of Allegiance and made “In God We Trust” the country’s official motto. For the first time, America became a thoroughly religious nation. Provocative and authoritative, One Nation Under God reveals how the comingling of money, religion, and politics created a false origin story that continues to define and divide American politics today.

Religion in America

Religion in America
Author: Edwin Scott Gaustad Professor of Religion and Professor of History John Corrigan,John Corrigan,Winthrop Hudson
Pages: 416
ISBN: 9781317344605
Available:
Release: 2015-08-07
Editor: Routledge
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

This comprehensive narrative account of religion in America from 1607 through the present depicts the religious life of the American people within the context of American society. It addresses topics ranging from the European/Puritan origins of American religious thought, the ramifications of the "Great Awakening", the effect of nationhood on religious practice, and the shifting religious configuration of the late 20th century.

The Modern Review

The Modern Review
Author: Ramananda Chatterjee
Pages: 329
ISBN: UCAL:$B204073
Available:
Release: 1964
Editor: Unknown
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Includes section "Reviews and notices of books".

Next American Nation

Next American Nation
Author: Michael Lind
Pages: 448
ISBN: 1451603096
Available:
Release: 2010-06-15
Editor: Simon and Schuster
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Are we now, or have we ever been, a nation? As this century comes to a close, debates over immigration policy, racial preferences, and multiculturalism challenge the consensus that formerly grounded our national culture. The question of our national identity is as urgent as it has ever been in our history. Is our society disintegrating into a collection of separate ethnic enclaves, or is there a way that we can forge a coherent, unified identity as we enter the 21st century? In this "marvelously written, wide-ranging and thought-provoking"* book, Michael Lind provides a comprehensive revisionist view of the American past and offers a concrete proposal for nation-building reforms to strengthen the American future. He shows that the forces of nationalism and the ideal of a trans-racial melting pot need not be in conflict with each other, and he provides a practical agenda for a liberal nationalist revolution that would combine a new color-blind liberalism in civil rights with practical measures for reducing class-based barriers to racial integration. A stimulating critique of every kind of orthodox opinion as well as a vision of a new "Trans-American" majority, The Next American Nation may forever change the way we think and talk about American identity. *New York Newsday

Religion in American Politics

Religion in American Politics
Author: Frank Lambert
Pages: 294
ISBN: 9780691146133
Available:
Release: 2010-02-21
Editor: Princeton University Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

The acclaimed author of The Barbary Wars offers a critical analysis of the often uneasy relationship between religion and politics in the United States from the Founding Fathers to the twenty-first century.

Presbyterianism and the New American Nation 1783 1826

Presbyterianism and the New American Nation  1783 1826
Author: Fred J. Hood
Pages: 736
ISBN: OCLC:228774185
Available:
Release: 1968
Editor: Unknown
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Letter to a Christian Nation

Letter to a Christian Nation
Author: Sam Harris
Pages: 96
ISBN: 9780307265777
Available:
Release: 2006
Editor: Alfred a Knopf Incorporated
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Argues that the increasing power of Christian fundamentalists in American politics threatens the country's citizens, blames the Bible for promoting intolerance of other faiths, and describes atheism as "an admission of the obvious."

The Nation s Schools

The Nation s Schools
Author: Michael Vincent O'Shea
Pages: 329
ISBN: CORNELL:31924098509932
Available:
Release: 1929
Editor: Unknown
Language: en

Explanation of the Book: