Black Like Who

Black Like Who
Author: Rinaldo Walcott
Pages: 187
ISBN: 9781897414477
Available:
Release: 2003
Editor: Insomniac Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Rinaldo Walcott's groundbreaking study of black culture in Canada, Black Like Who?, caused such an uproar upon its publication in 1997 that Insomniac Press has decided to publish a second revised edition of this perennial best-seller. With its incisive readings of hip-hop, film, literature, social unrest, sports, music and the electronic media, Walcott's book not only assesses the role of black Canadians in defining Canada, it also argues strenuously against any notion of an essentialist Canadian blackness. As erudite on the issue of American super-critic Henry Louis Gates' blindness to black Canadian realities as he is on the rap of the Dream Warriors and Maestro Fresh Wes, Walcott's essays are thought-provoking and always controversial in the best sense of the word. They have added and continue to add immeasurably to public debate.

Black Like Me

Black Like Me
Author: John Howard Griffin
Pages: 256
ISBN: 9781609401085
Available:
Release: 2006-04-01
Editor: Wings Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

This American classic has been corrected from the original manuscripts and indexed, featuring historic photographs and an extensive biographical afterword.

Black Like You

Black Like You
Author: John Strausbaugh
Pages: 384
ISBN: 9781101216057
Available:
Release: 2007-08-16
Editor: Penguin
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

A refreshingly clearheaded and taboo-breaking look at race relations reveals that American culture is neither Black nor White nor Other, but a mix-a mongrel. Black Like You is an erudite and entertaining exploration of race relations in American popular culture. Particularly compelling is Strausbaugh's eagerness to tackle blackface-a strange, often scandalous, and now taboo entertainment. Although blackface performance came to be denounced as purely racist mockery, and shamefacedly erased from most modern accounts of American cultural history, Black Like You shows that the impact of blackface on American culture was deep and long-lasting. Its influence can be seen in rock and hiphop; in vaudeville, Broadway, and gay drag performances; in Mark Twain and "gangsta lit"; in the earliest filmstrips and the 2004 movie White Chicks; on radio and television; in advertising and product marketing; and even in the way Americans speak. Strausbaugh enlivens themes that are rarely discussed in public, let alone with such candor and vision: - American culture neither conforms to knee-jerk racism nor to knee-jerk political correctness. It is neither Black nor White nor Other, but a mix-a mongrel. - No history is best forgotten, however uncomfortable it may be to remember. The power of blackface to engender mortification and rage in Americans to this day is reason enough to examine what it tells us about our culture and ourselves. - Blackface is still alive. Its impact and descendants-including Black performers in "whiteface"-can be seen all around us today.

Black Like Us

Black Like Us
Author: Devon W. Carbado,Donald Weise
Pages: 555
ISBN: 9781573447140
Available:
Release: 2011-10-01
Editor: Cleis Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Chronicles one hundred years of African-American homosexual literature, from the turn-of-the-century writings of Alice Dunbar Nelson, to the Harlem Renaissance of Langston Hughes, to the emerging sexual liberation movements of the later postwar era as reflected by James Baldwin. Original.

Black Like Me

Black Like Me
Author: JOHN HOWARD. GRIFFIN
Pages: 256
ISBN: 1788164520
Available:
Release: 2019-10-31
Editor: Unknown
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

In the autumn of 1959, a white Texan journalist named John Howard Griffin travelled across the Deep South of the United States disguised as a black man. Black Like Me is Griffin's own account of his journey. Originally commissioned by the African-American general-interest magazine Sepia under the title 'Journey into Shame', it was published in book-form in 1961, revealing to a white audience the day-to-day experience of racism in segregation-era America.Selling over five million copies, Black Like Me became one of the best-known accounts of race and racism in the 1960s, and helped turn the eyes of white society towards the everyday indignities and injustices of segregation. Today, sixty years after Griffin's extraordinary journey across the racial divide, Black Like Me's unrepeatable act of journalistic intrepidity stands as a fascinating document of its times. 'John Howard Griffin has come closer to understanding what it's like to be black in America than any white man that I know.' Louis Lomax, Saturday Review'If it was a frightening experience for him as nothing but a make-believe Negro for sixty-six days, then you think about what real Negroes in America have gone through for 400 years.' Malcom X

Afro Caribbean Immigrants and the Politics of Incorporation

Afro Caribbean Immigrants and the Politics of Incorporation
Author: Reuel R. Rogers
Pages: 329
ISBN: 9781139452724
Available:
Release: 2006-04-24
Editor: Cambridge University Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

This book examines the political behavior of Afro-Caribbean immigrants in New York City to answer a familiar, but nagging question about American democracy. Does racism still complicate or limit the political integration patterns of racial minorities in the United States? With the arrival of unprecedented numbers of immigrants from Asia, Latin America, and the Caribbean over the last several decades, there is reason once again to consider this question. The country is confronting the challenge of incorporating a steady, substantial stream of non-white, non-European voluntary immigrants into the political system. Will racism make this process as difficult for these newcomers as it did for African Americans? The book concludes discrimination does interfere with the immigrants' adjustment to American political life. But their political options and strategic choices in the face of this challenge are unexpected ones, not anticipated by standard accounts in the political science literature.

Black Like Kyra White Like Me

Black Like Kyra  White Like Me
Author: Judith Vigna
Pages: 32
ISBN: 0613295625
Available:
Release: 1996-01-01
Editor: Turtleback
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

When a black family moves to an all-white neighborhood, prejudice rears its ugly head as the white adults behave rudely and children's friendships break up.

Black Like You

Black Like You
Author: Herman Mashaba,Isabella Morris
Pages: 237
ISBN: 0620456868
Available:
Release: 2012
Editor: Unknown
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Black Futures

Black Futures
Author: Kimberly Drew,Jenna Wortham
Pages: 544
ISBN: 9780399181153
Available:
Release: 2021-10-26
Editor: One World/Ballantine
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

"A literary experience unlike any I've had in recent memory . . . a blueprint for this moment and the next, for where Black folks have been and where they might be going."--The New York Times Book Review (Editors' Choice) What does it mean to be Black and alive right now? Kimberly Drew and Jenna Wortham have brought together this collection of work--images, photos, essays, memes, dialogues, recipes, tweets, poetry, and more--to tell the story of the radical, imaginative, provocative, and gorgeous world that Black creators are bringing forth today. The book presents a succession of startling and beautiful pieces that generate an entrancing rhythm: Readers will go from conversations with activists and academics to memes and Instagram posts, from powerful essays to dazzling paintings and insightful infographics. In answering the question of what it means to be Black and alive, Black Futures opens a prismatic vision of possibility for every reader.

Vanguard

Vanguard
Author: Martha S. Jones
Pages: 352
ISBN: 9781541618602
Available:
Release: 2020-09-08
Editor: Basic Books
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

The epic history of African American women's pursuit of political power -- and how it transformed America. In the standard story, the suffrage crusade began in Seneca Falls in 1848 and ended with the ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment in 1920. But this overwhelmingly white women's movement did not win the vote for most black women. Securing their rights required a movement of their own. In Vanguard, acclaimed historian Martha S. Jones offers a new history of African American women's political lives in America. She recounts how they defied both racism and sexism to fight for the ballot, and how they wielded political power to secure the equality and dignity of all persons. From the earliest days of the republic to the passage of the 1965 Voting Rights Act and beyond, Jones excavates the lives and work of black women -- Maria Stewart, Frances Ellen Watkins Harper, Fannie Lou Hamer, and more -- who were the vanguard of women's rights, calling on America to realize its best ideals.

For Black Girls Like Me

For Black Girls Like Me
Author: Mariama J. Lockington
Pages: 176
ISBN: 9780374308063
Available:
Release: 2019-07-30
Editor: Farrar, Straus and Giroux (BYR)
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

In this lyrical coming-of-age story about family, sisterhood, music, race, and identity, Mariama J. Lockington draws on some of the emotional truths from her own experiences growing up with an adoptive white family. I am a girl but most days I feel like a question mark. Makeda June Kirkland is eleven years old, adopted, and black. Her parents and big sister are white, and even though she loves her family very much, Makeda often feels left out. When Makeda's family moves from Maryland to New Mexico, she leaves behind her best friend, Lena— the only other adopted black girl she knows— for a new life. In New Mexico, everything is different. At home, Makeda’s sister is too cool to hang out with her anymore and at school, she can’t seem to find one real friend. Through it all, Makeda can’t help but wonder: What would it feel like to grow up with a family that looks like me? Through singing, dreaming, and writing secret messages back and forth with Lena, Makeda might just carve a small place for herself in the world. For Black Girls Like Me is for anyone who has ever asked themselves: How do you figure out where you are going if you don’t know where you came from?

Black Ethnics

Black Ethnics
Author: Christina M. Greer
Pages: 212
ISBN: 9780199989317
Available:
Release: 2013-06-27
Editor: Oxford University Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

In an age where racial and ethnic identity intersect, intertwine, and interact in increasingly complex ways, Black Ethnics: Race, Immigration, and the Pursuit of the American Dream offers a superb and rigorous analysis of black politics and coalitions in the post-Civil Rights era. Using an original survey of a New York City labor population and multiple national data sources, author Christina M. Greer explores the political significance of ethnicity for new immigrant and native-born blacks. Black Ethnics concludes that racial and ethnic identities affect the ways in which black ethnic groups conceptualize their possibilities for advancement and placement within the American polity. The ethnic and racial dual identity for blacks leads to significant distinctions in political behavior, feelings of incorporation, and policy choices in ways not previously theorized. The steady immigration of black populations from Africa and the Caribbean over the past few decades has fundamentally changed the racial, ethnic, and political landscape in the U.S. An important question for social scientists is how these 'new' blacks will behave politically in the US. Should we expect new black immigrants to orient themselves to politics in the same manner as native Blacks? Will the different histories of the new immigrants and native-born blacks lead to different political orientations and behavior, and perhaps to political tensions and conflict among black ethnic groups residing in America? And to what extent will this new population fracture the black coalition inside of the Democratic party? With increases in immigration of black ethnic populations in the U.S., the political, social, and economic integration processes of black immigrants does not completely echo that of native-born American blacks. The emergent complexity of black intra-racial identity and negotiations within the American polity raise new questions about black political incorporation, assimilation, acceptance, and fulfillment of the American Dream. By comparing Afro-Caribbean and African groups to native-born blacks, this book develops a more nuanced and accurate understanding of the 'new black America' in the twenty-first century. Lastly, Black Ethnics explores how foreign-born blacks create new ways of defining and understanding black politics and coalitions in the post-Civil Rights era.

Black Like Me

Black Like Me
Author: Spencer Borisoff,Len Barry,Leonard Borisoff,Spencer Barry
Pages: 255
ISBN: 1904408346
Available:
Release: 2008-05-01
Editor: Unknown
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

This is a heartwarming, ever-evolving story about a socially transplanted Caucasian brother and sister thrust by circumstance into life and love in the hood. It is the joy of acceptance and the pain of rejection finally told from the opposite perspective of black Americans being denied assimilation into white society. It is the "OC" inside out, blended with Spike Lee's Jungle Fever upside down, and a kinder, warmer Eminem's 8-Mile. It is a story whose time has finally come. Its chemistry is exquisitely perfect. It presents situations that evoke only empathy, and characters that everyone will relate to and ultimately embrace. Black-Like-Me is the realization of American life and its true promise of human manifest destiny. Read this and swell up inside. Hey, you are about to fall in love!

The Skin We re In

The Skin We re In
Author: Desmond Cole
Pages: 320
ISBN: 9780385686341
Available:
Release: 2020-01-09
Editor: Unknown
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

In May 2015, the cover story of Toronto Life magazine shook Canada's largest city to its core. Desmond Cole's "The Skin I'm In" exposed the racist practices of the Toronto police force, detailing the dozens of times Cole had been stopped and interrogated under the controversial practice of carding. The story quickly came to national prominence, went on to win a number of National Magazine Awards and catapulted its author into the public sphere. Cole used his newfound profile to draw insistent, unyielding attention to the injustices faced by Black Canadians on a daily basis- the devastating effects of racist policing; the hopelessness produced by an education system that expects little of its black students and withholds from them the resources they need to succeed more fully; the heartbreak of those vulnerable before the child welfare system and those separated from their families by discriminatory immigration laws. Both Cole's activism and journalism find vibrant expression in his first book, The Skin We're In. Puncturing once and for all the bubble of Canadian smugness and naive assumptions of a post-racial nation, Cole chronicles just one year-2017-in the struggle against racism in this country. It was a year that saw calls for tighter borders when African refugees braved frigid temperatures to cross into Manitoba from the States, racial epithets used by a school board trustee, a six-year-old girl handcuffed at school. It was also a year of solidarity between Indigenous people and people of colour in Canada, a commitment forged in response to sesquicentennial celebrations that ignored the impact of violent conquest and genocide. The year also witnessed the profound personal and professional ramifications of Desmond Cole's unwavering determination to combat injustice. In April, Cole disrupted a Toronto police board meeting by calling for the destruction of all data collected through carding. Following the protest, Cole, a columnist with the Toronto Star, was summoned to a meeting with the paper's opinions editor and was informed that his activism violated company policy. Rather than limit his efforts defending Black lives, Cole chose to sever his relationship with the publication. Then in July, at another TPS meeting, Cole challenged the board publicly, addressing rumours of a police cover-up of the beating of Dafonte Miller by an off-duty police officer and his brother. A beating so brutal that Miller lost one of his eyes, and that went uninvestigated for four months. When Cole refused to leave the meeting until the question was publicly addressed, he was arrested. The image of Cole walking, handcuffed and flanked by officers, out of the meeting fortified the distrust between the city's Black community and its police force. (A trespassing charge against Cole will be challenged in the new year as a violation of his right to freedom of expression.) In a month-by-month chronicle, Cole locates the deep cultural, historical and political roots of each event so that what emerges is a personal, painful and comprehensive picture of entrenched, systemic inequality. Urgent, controversial and unsparingly honest, The Skin We're In is destined to become a vital text for anti-racist and social justice movements in Canada, as well as a potent antidote to the all-too-present complacency of many white Canadians.

The Hanging of Ang lique

The Hanging of Ang  lique
Author: Afua Cooper
Pages: 349
ISBN: 9780820329406
Available:
Release: 2006
Editor: University of Georgia Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

New light is shed on the largely misunderstood or ignored history of slavery in Canada through this portrait of slave Marie-Joseph Angelique, who in 1734 was arrested, tried, convicted, and executed for starting a fire that destroyed more than forty Montreal buildings. Simultaneous.

On Property

On Property
Author: Rinaldo Walcott
Pages: 329
ISBN: 9781771964081
Available:
Release: 2021-02-02
Editor: Biblioasis
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

From plantation rebellion to prison labour's super-exploitation, Walcott examines the relationship between policing and property. That a man can lose his life for passing a fake $20 bill when we know our economies are flush with fake money says something damning about the way we’ve organized society. Yet the intensity of the calls to abolish the police after George Floyd’s death surprised almost everyone. What, exactly, does abolition mean? How did we get here? And what does property have to do with it? In On Property, Rinaldo Walcott explores the long shadow cast by slavery’s afterlife and shows how present-day abolitionists continue the work of their forebears in service of an imaginative, creative philosophy that ensures freedom and equality for all. Thoughtful, wide-ranging, compassionate, and profound, On Property makes an urgent plea for a new ethics of care.

The Devil Rides Outside

The Devil Rides Outside
Author: John Howard Griffin
Pages: 515
ISBN: 9781609401405
Available:
Release: 2010-10-01
Editor: Wings Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

No less a critic than Clifton Fadiman called The Devil Rides Outside a "staggering novel." The first novel of John H. Griffin, it written during the author's decade of blindness following an injury suffered during the closing days of World War II. As Time Magazine described it, The Devil Rides Outside "has some things relatively rare in U.S. letters: energy, earnestness and unashamed religious fervor." Written as a diary, the novel relates the intellectual and spiritual battles of a young American musicologist who is studying Gregorian chant in a French Benedictine monastery. Even though he is not Catholic, he must live like the monks, sleeping in a cold stone cell, eating poor food, sharing latrine duties. His dreams rage with memories of his Paris mistress; his days are spent being encouraged by the monks to seek God. He takes up residence outside the monastery after an illness, but he finds the village a slough of greed and pettiness and temptation. Indeed, as the French proverb says, "the devil rides outside the monastery walls."

I Don t Like the Blues

I Don t Like the Blues
Author: B. Brian Foster
Pages: 206
ISBN: 9781469660431
Available:
Release: 2020-10-08
Editor: UNC Press Books
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

How do you love and not like the same thing at the same time? This was the riddle that met Mississippi writer B. Brian Foster when he returned to his home state to learn about Black culture and found himself hearing about the blues. One moment, Black Mississippians would say they knew and appreciated the blues. The next, they would say they didn't like it. For five years, Foster listened and asked: "How?" "Why not?" "Will it ever change?" This is the story of the answers to his questions. In this illuminating work, Foster takes us where not many blues writers and scholars have gone: into the homes, memories, speculative visions, and lifeworlds of Black folks in contemporary Mississippi to hear what they have to say about the blues and all that has come about since their forebears first sang them. In so doing, Foster urges us to think differently about race, place, and community development and models a different way of hearing the sounds of Black life, a method that he calls listening for the backbeat.

Black Like Me Teacher Guide

Black Like Me Teacher Guide
Author: John Howard Griffin,Novel Units, Inc. Staff
Pages: 32
ISBN: 1581308809
Available:
Release: 2005
Editor: Unknown
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Griffin turned himself into a black man to experience the sting of prejudice firsthand.

Man in the Mirror

Man in the Mirror
Author: Robert Bonazzi
Pages: 227
ISBN: 9781609401351
Available:
Release: 2010-10
Editor: Wings Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

First published by Orbis Books in 1997,Man in the Mirrortells the story behindBlack Like Me, a book that astonished America upon its publication in 1961, and remains an American classic 50 years later. In 1959 a white writer darkened his skin and passed for a time as a "Negro" in the Deep South. John Howard Griffin was that writer, and his bookBlack Like Meswiftly became a national sensation. Few readers know of the extraordinary journey that led to Griffin's risky "experiment"—the culmination of a lifetime of risk, struggle, and achievement. A native of Texas, Griffin was a medical student who became involved in the rescue of Jews in occupied France; a U.S. serviceman among tribal peoples in the South Pacific, where he suffered an injury that left him blinded for a decade; a convert to Catholicism; and, finally, a novelist and writer. All these experiences fed Griffin's drive to understand what it means to be human, and how human beings can justify treating their fellows—of whatever race or physical description—as "the intrinsic Other." After describing this journey and analyzing the text ofBlack Like Me, Robert Bonazzi treats the dramatic aftermath of Griffin's experiment and life.Man in the Mirrorprovides a fascinating look at the roots of this important book, and offers reflections on why, after all these years, it retains its impact and relevance.