World War II and the American Indian

World War II and the American Indian
Author: Kenneth William Townsend
Pages: 272
ISBN: UOM:39015050276032
Available:
Release: 2000
Editor: Unknown
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Narrates the Native Americans' experiences from 1930 to 1945, including their responses to the draft, stories of battle overseas, accounts by women working in defense industries, and decisions to assimilate into postwar society.

American Indians and World War II

American Indians and World War II
Author: Anonim
Pages: 247
ISBN: 0806131845
Available:
Release: 1999-09-01
Editor: University of Oklahoma Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Details the impact of World War II on American Indian life, arguing that the war had a more profound and lasting effect on the course of Indian affairs in the twentieth century than any other single event or period, and assessing its consequences for American Indians and whites.

Native American Code Talker in World War II

Native American Code Talker in World War II
Author: Ed Gilbert
Pages: 64
ISBN: 9781780966342
Available:
Release: 2012-04-20
Editor: Bloomsbury Publishing
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

'Were it not for the Navajo Code Talkers the Marines would never have taken Iwo Jima and other places' (Anonymous, Marine Corps signal officer). Ed Gilbert uses personal interviews with veterans to tell their fascinating story. Beginning with the first operational use of Native American languages in World War I, he explores how in World War II the US again came to employ this subtle, but powerful 'weapon.' Despite all efforts, the Japanese were never able to decode their messages and the Navajo code talkers contributed significantly to US victories in the Pacific. Approximately 400 Navajos served in this crucial role. Their legend of the 'code talker' has been celebrated by Hollywood in films, such as Windtalkers, and this book reveals the real-life story of their extraordinary involvement in World War II.

Crossing the Pond

Crossing the Pond
Author: Jere Bishop Franco
Pages: 232
ISBN: 1574410652
Available:
Release: 1999
Editor: University of North Texas Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

"Crossing the Pond also chronicles the unsuccessful efforts of Nazi propagandists to exploit Native Americans for the Third Reich, as well as the successful efforts of the United States government and the media to recruit Native Americans, utilize their resources, and publicize their activities for the war effort. Attention is also given to the postwar experiences of Native American men and women as they sought the franchise, educational equality, economic stability, the right to purchase alcohol, and the same amount of respect given to other American war veterans."--BOOK JACKET.

Navajo Code Talkers

Navajo Code Talkers
Author: Brynn Baker
Pages: 32
ISBN: 9781491448373
Available:
Release: 2015-08
Editor: Capstone
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

"Discusses the heroic actions and experiences of the Navajo code talkers and the impact they made during times of war and conflict"--

The Code Talkers

The Code Talkers
Author: Robert Daily
Pages: 63
ISBN: 0531201902
Available:
Release: 1995
Editor: Franklin Watts
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Examines the history, culture, daily life, and current situation of the Tohono O'odham, whose name means the Desert People.

No One Ever Asked Me

No One Ever Asked Me
Author: Hollis Dorion Stabler
Pages: 183
ISBN: 9780803243248
Available:
Release: 2005
Editor: U of Nebraska Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

As a young adolescent, Hollis Dorion Stabler underwent a Native ceremony in which he was given the new name Na-zhin-thia, Slow to Rise. It was a name that no white person asked to know during Hollis's tour of duty in Anzio, his unacknowledged difference as an Omaha Indian adding to the poignancy of his uneasy fellowship with foreign and American soldiers alike. Stabler?s story?coming of age on the American plains, going to war, facing new estrangement upon coming home?is a universal one, rendered wonderfully strange and personal by Stabler?s uncommon perspective, which embraces two worlds, and by his unique voice. ø Stabler's experiences during World War II?tours of duty in Tunisia and Morocco as well as Italy and France, and the loss of his brother in battle?are at the center of this powerful memoir, which tells of growing up as an Omaha Indian in the small-town Midwest of Nebraska, Iowa, Kansas, and Oklahoma in the 1920s and 1930s. A descendant of the Indians who negotiated with Lewis and Clark on the Missouri River, Stabler describes a childhood that was a curious mixture of progressivism and Indian tradition, and that culminated in his enlisting in the old horse cavalry when war broke out?a path not so very different from that walked by his ancestors. Victoria Smith, of Cherokee-Delaware descent, interweaves historical insight with Stabler?s vivid reminiscences, providing a rich context for this singular life.

The Iroquois Struggle for Survival

The Iroquois Struggle for Survival
Author: Laurence M. Hauptman
Pages: 340
ISBN: 081562350X
Available:
Release: 1986-03-01
Editor: Syracuse University Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

From World War II onward, the Iroquois, one of the largest groups of Native Americans in North America, have confronted a series of crises threatening their continued existence. From the New York-Pennsylvania border, where the Army Corps of Engineers engulfed a vast tract of Seneca homeland with the Kinzua Dam, from the ambition of Robert Moses and the New York State Power Authority to develop the hydroelectric power of the Niagara Frontier (which eroded the land base of the Tuscaroras), from the construction of the Saint Lawrence Seaway (which took land from the Mohawks and still affects their fishing industry), to the present-day battles over the Oneida land claims in New York State and the Onondaga efforts to repatriate their wampum—Laurence Hauptman documents the bitter struggles of proud people to maintain their independence and strength in the modern world. Out of these battles came a renewed sense of Iroquois nationalism and nationwide Iroquois leadership in American Indian politics. Hauptman examines events leading to the emergence of the contemporary Iroquois, concluding with the takeover at Wounded Knee in the winter-spring of 1973 and the Supreme Court's Oneida decision in 1974. His research is based on historical documents, published materials, and interviews and fieldwork in every Iroquois community in the United States and several in Canada.

American Indians in World War I

American Indians in World War I
Author: Thomas Anthony Britten
Pages: 253
ISBN: 0826320902
Available:
Release: 1997
Editor: UNM Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Provides the first broad survey of Native American contributions during the war, examining how military service led to hightened expectations for changes in federal Indian policy and their standard of living.

The Language of Victory

The Language of Victory
Author: Gary Robinson
Pages: 152
ISBN: 1462003486
Available:
Release: 2011-08
Editor: Unknown
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Thanks to the 2002 Hollywood film "Windtalkers, " the Navajo code talkers of World War II emerged from the annals of history to become world famous. But few people know that at least twenty other American Indian languages were used to send coded military messages during World War I and II-messages that were never decoded by America's enemies. Relying on US Department of Defense documents, never-before-seen or heard interviews with Choctaw, Comanche, and Navajo code talkers, and other primary sources, filmmaker and American Indian historian Gary Robinson delivers a meticulously researched account of this little-known part of US history. In this multifaceted story, Robinson discusses the evolution of military communications and delves into the historical, cultural, and linguistic developments of the American Indians prior to World War I that led to their significant contribution during both world wars. Robinson digs deeper than the historical record. With skillful precision, he contrasts the changing federal government policies that transformed Native American languages from cultural relics worthy only of the trash bin to valued gems demanding preservation. He also questions how America's history might have been altered if missionaries and government agencies had successfully eliminated America's indigenous languages. Engaging and brilliantly constructed, "The Language of Victory" presents a compelling contribution to the historiography of World War II and the American Indian.

Indigenous Peoples and the Second World War

Indigenous Peoples and the Second World War
Author: R. Scott Sheffield,Noah Riseman
Pages: 368
ISBN: 9781108424639
Available:
Release: 2018-12-06
Editor: Cambridge University Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

A transnational history of how Indigenous peoples mobilised en masse to support the war effort on the battlefields and the home fronts.

Blood Narrative

Blood Narrative
Author: Chadwick Allen
Pages: 308
ISBN: 0822329476
Available:
Release: 2002-08-06
Editor: Duke University Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

DIVCompares the discourses of indigeneity used by Maori and Native American peoples and proposes the concept treaty discourse to characterize the relevant form of postcolonial situation./div

Code Talker

Code Talker
Author: Joseph Bruchac
Pages: 240
ISBN: 9781101664803
Available:
Release: 2006-07-06
Editor: Penguin
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

"Readers who choose the book for the attraction of Navajo code talking and the heat of battle will come away with more than they ever expected to find."—Booklist, starred review Throughout World War II, in the conflict fought against Japan, Navajo code talkers were a crucial part of the U.S. effort, sending messages back and forth in an unbreakable code that used their native language. They braved some of the heaviest fighting of the war, and with their code, they saved countless American lives. Yet their story remained classified for more than twenty years. But now Joseph Bruchac brings their stories to life for young adults through the riveting fictional tale of Ned Begay, a sixteen-year-old Navajo boy who becomes a code talker. His grueling journey is eye-opening and inspiring. This deeply affecting novel honors all of those young men, like Ned, who dared to serve, and it honors the culture and language of the Navajo Indians. An ALA Best Book for Young Adults "Nonsensational and accurate, Bruchac's tale is quietly inspiring..."—School Library Journal

The Liberator

The Liberator
Author: Alex Kershaw
Pages: 433
ISBN: 9780307888006
Available:
Release: 2013-10-15
Editor: Broadway Books
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Traces the achievements of the World War II regiments under Felix Sparks, documenting their clashes with Hitler's elite troops in Sicily and Alerno and their heroic liberation of the Dachau concentration camp. By the best-selling author of The Bedford Boys. 60,000 first printing.

Code Girls

Code Girls
Author: Liza Mundy
Pages: 432
ISBN: 9780316352550
Available:
Release: 2017-10-10
Editor: Hachette Books
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

The award-winning New York Times bestseller about the American women who secretly served as codebreakers during World War II--a "prodigiously researched and engrossing" (New York Times) book that "shines a light on a hidden chapter of American history" (Denver Post). Recruited by the U.S. Army and Navy from small towns and elite colleges, more than ten thousand women served as codebreakers during World War II. While their brothers and boyfriends took up arms, these women moved to Washington and learned the meticulous work of code-breaking. Their efforts shortened the war, saved countless lives, and gave them access to careers previously denied to them. A strict vow of secrecy nearly erased their efforts from history; now, through dazzling research and interviews with surviving code girls, bestselling author Liza Mundy brings to life this riveting and vital story of American courage, service, and scientific accomplishment.

Serving Their Country

Serving Their Country
Author: Paul C Rosier
Pages: 368
ISBN: 9780674054523
Available:
Release: 2010-03-01
Editor: Harvard University Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Over the twentieth century, American Indians fought for their right to be both American and Indian. In an illuminating book, Paul C. Rosier traces how Indians defined democracy, citizenship, and patriotism in both domestic and international contexts. Like African Americans, twentieth-century Native Americans served as a visible symbol of an America searching for rights and justice. American history is incomplete without their story.

Three Day Road

Three Day Road
Author: Joseph Boyden
Pages: 416
ISBN: 9780143175643
Available:
Release: 2008-05-06
Editor: Penguin Canada
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

It is 1919, and Niska, the last Oji-Cree woman to live off the land, has received word that one of the two boys she saw off to the Great War has returned. Xavier Bird, her sole living relation, is gravely wounded and addicted to morphine. As Niska slowly paddles her canoe on the three-day journey to bring Xavier home, travelling through the stark but stunning landscape of Northern Ontario, their respective stories emerge—stories of Niska’s life among her kin and of Xavier’s horrifying experiences in the killing fields of Ypres and the Somme.

The First Code Talkers

The First Code Talkers
Author: William C. Meadows
Pages: 378
ISBN: 9780806169859
Available:
Release: 2021-01-07
Editor: University of Oklahoma Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Many Americans know something about the Navajo code talkers in World War II—but little else about the military service of Native Americans, who have served in our armed forces since the American Revolution, and still serve in larger numbers than any other ethnic group. But, as we learn in this splendid work of historical restitution, code talking originated in World War I among Native soldiers whose extraordinary service resulted, at long last, in U.S. citizenship for all Native Americans. The first full account of these forgotten soldiers in our nation’s military history, The First Code Talkers covers all known Native American code talkers of World War I—members of the Choctaw, Oklahoma Cherokee, Comanche, Osage, and Sioux nations, as well as the Eastern Band of Cherokee and Ho-Chunk, whose veterans have yet to receive congressional recognition. William C. Meadows, the foremost expert on the subject, describes how Native languages, which were essentially unknown outside tribal contexts and thus could be as effective as formal encrypted codes, came to be used for wartime communication. While more than thirty tribal groups were eventually involved in World Wars I and II, this volume focuses on Native Americans in the American Expeditionary Forces during the First World War. Drawing on nearly thirty years of research—in U.S. military and Native American archives, surviving accounts from code talkers and their commanding officers, family records, newspaper accounts, and fieldwork in descendant communities—the author explores the origins, use, and legacy of the code talkers. In the process, he highlights such noted decorated veterans as Otis Leader, Joseph Oklahombi, and Calvin Atchavit and scrutinizes numerous misconceptions and popular myths about code talking and the secrecy surrounding the practice. With appendixes that include a timeline of pertinent events, biographies of known code talkers, and related World War I data, this book is the first comprehensive work ever published on Native American code talkers in the Great War and their critical place in American military history.

The Comanche Code Talkers of World War II

The Comanche Code Talkers of World War II
Author: William C. Meadows
Pages: 320
ISBN: 9780292778429
Available:
Release: 2009-03-06
Editor: University of Texas Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Among the allied troops that came ashore in Normandy on D-Day, June 6, 1944, were thirteen Comanches in the 4th Infantry Division, 4th Signal Company. Under German fire they laid communications lines and began sending messages in a form never before heard in Europe—coded Comanche. For the rest of World War II, the Comanche Code Talkers played a vital role in transmitting orders and messages in a code that was never broken by the Germans. This book tells the full story of the Comanche Code Talkers for the first time. Drawing on interviews with all surviving members of the unit, their original training officer, and fellow soldiers, as well as military records and news accounts, William C. Meadows follows the group from their recruitment and training to their active duty in World War II and on through their postwar lives up to the present. He also provides the first comparison of Native American code talking programs, comparing the Comanche Code Talkers with their better-known Navajo counterparts in the Pacific and with other Native Americans who used their languages, coded or not, for secret communication. Meadows sets this history in a larger discussion of the development of Native American code talking in World Wars I and II, identifying two distinct forms of Native American code talking, examining the attitudes of the American military toward Native American code talkers, and assessing the complex cultural factors that led Comanche and other Native Americans to serve their country in this way.

The Patriotism of American Indians in World War II

The Patriotism of American Indians in World War II
Author: Jere' Franco
Pages: 208
ISBN: OCLC:10492767
Available:
Release: 1983
Editor: Unknown
Language: en

Explanation of the Book: