Afrocentric Traditions

Afrocentric Traditions
Author: Jr. Conyers
Pages: 198
ISBN: 9781351533492
Available:
Release: 2017-07-12
Editor: Routledge
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Ever since the first contacts between Europe and Africa, African people have operated from the fringes of Eurocentric experience in the Western mind. Much of what we have studied in African history and culture, or literature and linguistics, or politics and economics, has been orchestrated from the standpoint of Europe's interests. Whether it is a matter of economics, history, politics, geographical concepts, or art, Africans have been seen as peripheral. This volume reviews the past in order to evaluate the present and move ahead with appropriate policies for the future. The articles in this volume, the first in a new serial publication in Africana studies, cover a broad range of subject matter and methodology. Topics range from the W.E.B. DuBois-Booker T. Washington schism that led to the formation of the Niagara movement, to the popular dissemination of black hip-hop culture. It opens with a description of Afrocentricity by Molefi K. Asante. Kobi K.K. Kambon and Reginald Rackley discuss the construct, that produces European cultural "misidentification" among Africans. Nell Irvin Painter, in discussing the Shoah and Southern history, parallels the rhetoric of hate that permeated the late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century German diatribes against Jews with that of the Southern white supremacists against blacks. Anthony B. Pinn notes similarities that tie together slavery and colonialism in a bond of existential and ontological destruction. Anthony J. Lemelle, Jr., examines critical issues about black masculinity. James B. Stewart elaborates on the development of Africana studies. Julius E. Thompson explores the historical importance of the African-American writer in Mississippi history. Cary DeCordova Wintz the basis of the conflict between W.E.B. DuBois and Booker T. Washington in an effort to expose its underlying causes. James L. Conyers, Jr. summarizes social and cultural movements, in particular the popular black hip-hop culture. Rounding out the pres

Afrocentric Visions

Afrocentric Visions
Author: Janice D. Hamlet
Pages: 280
ISBN: 9781452251233
Available:
Release: 1998-09-14
Editor: SAGE Publications
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

In this timely volume, editor Janice D Hamlet has chosen essays which illuminate various aspects of African American culture, refracted through the lens of Afrocentric thought. The book examines: Afrocentric ideology and methodology; Afrocentric approaches to the dynamics of communication; the Afrocentric influence on the black aesthetic, with an examination of language, literature, oral tradition, movies and television; and the future of Afrocentric visions.

An Afrocentric Manifesto

An Afrocentric Manifesto
Author: Molefi K. Asante
Pages: 178
ISBN: 0745641024
Available:
Release: 2007-12-17
Editor: Polity
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Molefi Kete Asante′s Afrocentric philosophy has become one of the most persistent influences in the social sciences and humanities over the past three decades. It strives to create new forms of discourse about Africa and the African Diaspora, impact on education through expanding curricula to be more inclusive, change the language of social institutions to reflect a more holistic universe, and revitalize conversations in Africa, Europe, and America, about an African renaissance based on commitment to fundamental ideas of agency, centeredness, and cultural location. In An Afrocentric Manifesto, Molefi Kete Asante examines and explores the cultural perspective closest to the existential reality of African people in order to present an innovative interpretation on the modern issues confronting contemporary society. Thus, this book engages the major critiques of Afrocentricity, defends the necessity for African people to view themselves as agents instead of as objects on the fringes of Europe, and proposes a more democratic framework for human relationships. An Afrocentric Manifesto completes Asante′s quartet on Afrocentric theory. It is at the cutting edge of this new paradigm with implications for all disciplines and fields of study. It will be essential reading for urban studies, philosophy, African and African American Studies, social work, sociology, political science, and communication.

CULTURE OF NAMES IN AFRICA

CULTURE OF NAMES IN AFRICA
Author: Emma Umana Clasberry
Pages: 343
ISBN: 9781469138060
Available:
Release: 2012-01-12
Editor: Xlibris Corporation
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

INTRODUCTION Personal name is a vital aspect of cultural identity. As a child, you may have loved or hated your name. But you were rarely indifferent to it. “What’s in a name?” Shakespeare asked. “That which we call a rose by any other name would smell as sweet”, he explained. Perhaps in England or somewhere else in Europe, but not in Africa. Personal names in African have meanings, can affect personality, hinder or enhance life initiatives. They serve to establish a connection between name and cultural background, and thus, provide some information about cultural affinity and more, such as express one’s spirituality, philosophy of life, political or socio-economic status as defined by a given ethnic cleavage. African names tell stories, convert abstract ideas to stories, and tell story of the story about different aspects of one’s life. They commemorate any unusual circumstance the family or community once experienced, or world event that took place around the time of a child’s birth. Outside a given cultural environment, names boost and nurture cultural pride and identity, showcase a people’s appreciation of their culture and their readiness to defend and live their culture with pride and dignity. Naming practices that tell histories behind the names were the norms in Nigeria-Ibibio, and in fact, in Africa, until the encroachment of two historical forces in Africans’ affairs. Christianization and colonization, more than any other forces in history, shattered the connection between personal name and cultural affinity, and have ever-since contributed to the gradual erosion of African culture of names. On the continent, the combined efforts of their human agents - the missionaries and British colonial personnel, directly and indirectly, through their policies and practices, caused African- Nigerians to give up their culture relevant names in favor of foreign ones. Apart from direct erosion of culture of names, ‘colonial administration’ (a term I use mostly to refer to the combined efforts of the missionaries and British colonial personnel) in Nigeria abrogated many religious, socio-economic and political traditions which were intimately intertwined with the people’s naming practices. Their attempt to replace African traditions with European ones through coercing Africans to accept Western values and beliefs consequently disabled many desirable African traditional structures, including authentic African naming practices, and caused some to fall into disuse. A third force was early European-African trade. Although the impact of the presence of European merchants in Nigeria was minimal in this regard, some of their activities have also left a dent on African naming practices by introducing foreign bodies into the people’s names database. Even though these alien forces invaded and injected foreign values into Africa over a century ago, their impact on naming practices continues to be felt by Africans. European intrusion in relation to African naming practices did not end on the continent. The Trans- Atlantic Trade on human cargo was another major historical event that did not only forcefully disconnect many Africans from their cultural root and natural habitat, but also mutilated authentic African naming practices among them. Consequently, Africans in Diaspora had European names imposed upon them by their slave masters. Today, many Africans on the continent and in Diaspora continue to carry names which are foreign, names whose meanings they do not know, names the bearers can not even pronounce correctly in some ethnic contexts, and names which have no relevance to nor any form of link with the bearers’ cultural background. In effect, culture of names, as many other African customary practices, has lost its savor. Some peoples of African descent still cherish these colonized names. Some do not, and are making practical efforts to reclaim authentic African cul

Afrocentric Traditions

Afrocentric Traditions
Author: James L. Conyers
Pages: 198
ISBN: 1412804787
Available:
Release: 2005
Editor: Transaction Pub
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Ever since the first contacts between Europe and Africa, African people have operated from the fringes of Eurocentric experience in the Western mind. Much of what we have studied in African history and culture, or literature and linguistics, or politics and economics, has been orchestrated from the standpoint of Europe's interests. Whether it is a matter of economics, history, politics, geographical concepts, or art, Africans have been seen as peripheral. This volume reviews the past in order to evaluate the present and move ahead with appropriate policies for the future. The articles in this volume, the first in a new serial publication in Africana studies, cover a broad range of subject matter and methodology. Topics range from the W.E.B. DuBois-Booker T. Washington schism that led to the formation of the Niagara movement, to the popular dissemination of black hip-hop culture. It opens with a description of Afrocentricity by Molefi K. Asante. Kobi K.K. Kambon and Reginald Rackley discuss the construct, that produces European cultural "misidentification" among Africans. Nell Irvin Painter, in discussing the Shoah and Southern history, parallels the rhetoric of hate that permeated the late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century German diatribes against Jews with that of the Southern white supremacists against blacks. Anthony B. Pinn notes similarities that tie together slavery and colonialism in a bond of existential and ontological destruction. Anthony J. Lemelle, Jr., examines critical issues about black masculinity. James B. Stewart elaborates on the development of Africana studies. Julius E. Thompson explores the historical importance of the African-American writer in Mississippi history. Cary DeCordova Wintz the basis of the conflict between W.E.B. DuBois and Booker T. Washington in an effort to expose its underlying causes. James L. Conyers, Jr. summarizes social and cultural movements, in particular the popular black hip-hop culture. Rounding out the presentations, Lea Redmond and Charles P. Henry trace the roots of black studies in the United States. Afrocentric Traditions will have particular interest for scholars in the fields of American studies, cultural studies, historians, sociologists, and specialists in African-American studies. James L. Conyers, Jr., is a University Professor of African American Studies and director, African American studies program, University of Houston.

Afrocentric Traditions

Afrocentric Traditions
Author: James L. Conyers, Jr.
Pages: 198
ISBN: 9781412808866
Available:
Release: 2011-12-31
Editor: Transaction Publishers
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Ever since the first contacts between Europe and Africa, African people have operated from the fringes of Eurocentric experience in the Western mind. Much of what we have studied in African history and culture, or literature and linguistics, or politics and economics, has been orchestrated from the standpoint of Europe's interests. Whether it is a matter of economics, history, politics, geographical concepts, or art, Africans have been seen as peripheral. This volume reviews the past in order to evaluate the present and move ahead with appropriate policies for the future. The articles in this volume, the first in a new serial publication in Africana studies, cover a broad range of subject matter and methodology. Topics range from the W.E.B. DuBois-Booker T. Washington schism that led to the formation of the Niagara movement, to the popular dissemination of black hip-hop culture. It opens with a description of Afrocentricity by Molefi K. Asante. Kobi K.K. Kambon and Reginald Rackley discuss the construct, that produces European cultural "misidentification" among Africans. Nell Irvin Painter, in discussing the Shoah and Southern history, parallels the rhetoric of hate that permeated the late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century German diatribes against Jews with that of the Southern white supremacists against blacks. Anthony B. Pinn notes similarities that tie together slavery and colonialism in a bond of existential and ontological destruction. Anthony J. Lemelle, Jr., examines critical issues about black masculinity. James B. Stewart elaborates on the development of Africana studies. Julius E. Thompson explores the historical importance of the African-American writer in Mississippi history. Cary DeCordova Wintz the basis of the conflict between W.E.B. DuBois and Booker T. Washington in an effort to expose its underlying causes. James L. Conyers, Jr. summarizes social and cultural movements, in particular the popular black hip-hop culture. Rounding out the presentations, Lea Redmond and Charles P. Henry trace the roots of black studies in the United States. Afrocentric Traditions will have particular interest for scholars in the fields of American studies, cultural studies, historians, sociologists, and specialists in African-American studies. James L. Conyers, Jr., is a University Professor of African American Studies and director, African American studies program, University of Houston.

Ashanti to Zulu

Ashanti to Zulu
Author: Margaret Musgrove,Leo Dillon
Pages: 32
ISBN: UOM:39076000615075
Available:
Release: 1976
Editor: Dial Books
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Explains some traditions and customs of 26 African tribes beginning with letters from A to Z.

African American Consciousness

African American Consciousness
Author: Jr. Conyers
Pages: 196
ISBN: 9781351533676
Available:
Release: 2017-07-12
Editor: Routledge
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

African American Consciousness focuses on ideas of culture, race, and class within the interdisciplinary matrix of Africana Studies. Even more important, it uses a methodology that emphasizes interpretation and the necessity of interdisciplinary research and writing in a global society. Worldview, culture, analytic thinking, and historiography can all be used as tools of analysis, and in the process of discovery, use pedagogy, and survey research of Africana history. Advancing the idea of Africana Studies, mixed methodology, and triangulation, the contributors provide alternative approaches toward examining this phenomena, with regard to place, space, and time. The essays in this volume include Reynaldo Anderson, "Black History dot.com" Greg Carr, "Black Consciousness, Pan-Africanism and the African World History Project" Karanja Carroll, "A Genealogical Review of the Worldview Concept and Framework in Africana Studies" Denise Martin, "Reflections on African Celestial Culture" Serie McDougal "Teaching Black Males" Demetrius Pearson, "Cowboys of Color" Pamela Reed, "Heirs to Disparity" and Andrew Smallwood, "Malcolm X's Leadership and Legacy." The researchers in this volume investigate, explore, and review patterns of functional, normative, and expressive behavior. The past and present of Africana culture is represented, showing how reflexivity can be an adjustable concept to organize, process, and interpret data. Moreover, humanism and social science demonstrate how researchers establish, extract, and identify the limitations and alternative approaches to research of the historic conditions of black Americans.

The Invention of Africa Gnosis Philosophy and the Order of Knowledge

The Invention of Africa  Gnosis  Philosophy  and the Order of Knowledge
Author: Vy Mudimbe
Pages: 329
ISBN: 9781794884069
Available:
Release: 2020-01-21
Editor: Lulu Press, Inc
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

"... groundbreaking... clear, straightforward, and economical.... seminal... " ―American Anthropologist "This is a challenging book... a remarkable contribution to African intellectual history." ―International Journal of African Historical Studies "Mudimbe’s description of the struggles over Africa’s self-invention are vivid and rewarding. From Blyden to Sartre, Temples to Senghor, Mudimbe provides a bold and versatile resume of Africa’s literary inventors." ―Village Voice Literary Supplement "... a landmark achievement in African studies." ―Journal of Religion in Africa In this unique and provocative book, Zairean philosopher and writer V. Y. Mudimbe addresses the multiple scholarly discourses that exist―African and non-African―concerning the meaning of Africa and being African.

Culture in Liberia

Culture in Liberia
Author: Santosh C. Saha
Pages: 147
ISBN: 0773483330
Available:
Release: 1998
Editor: Edwin Mellen Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Arguing that despite political antagonism between the minority Americo-Liberians and the majority indigenous Liberians, this study documents a healthy and effective interaction which created a sort of cultural dualism in Liberia to the benefit of the African heritage.

An Afrocentric Pan Africanist Vision

An Afrocentric Pan Africanist Vision
Author: Molefi Kete Asante
Pages: 178
ISBN: 9781793628961
Available:
Release: 2020-10-29
Editor: Lexington Books
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

In An Afrocentric Pan Africanist Vision: Afrocentric Essays, Molefi Kete Asante, engages the age-old debate on Pan Africanism by providing an innovative orientation to the established discourse developed during the twentieth century. Asante opens an interrogation of the Padmorian tradition of a socialist Pan Africanism by suggesting that a deeper entry into the histories and narratives of the literary, economic, social, and spiritual values of the thousands of African societies scattered throughout the world could sustain a different agency analysis of Pan Africanism without grafting an external idea on the unity of Africa. Using his vast knowledge of the history of Africa, Asante suggests that the African renaissance cannot take place unless there is a commitment to creating an African community conscious of its own myths, origins, and economic, cultural, and philosophical traditions.

Human Services and the Afrocentric Paradigm

Human Services and the Afrocentric Paradigm
Author: Jerome H Schiele,Jerome Schiele
Pages: 346
ISBN: 9781135409784
Available:
Release: 2013-09-13
Editor: Routledge
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Discover how human services professionals can help to eliminate cultural oppression! Human Services and the Afrocentric Paradigm presents a new way of understanding human behavior, attacking social problems, and exploring social issues. This excellent guide shows that understanding the simultaneous forces of oppression and spiritual alienation in American society serves as a foundation for understanding the societal problems here. The first book to offer a comprehensive exposition of how the Afrocentric paradigm can be used by human service professionals and community advocates, Human Services and the Afrocentric Paradigm discusses why and how human service work is hampered by Eurocentric cultural values and will help you to offer fair and effective services to your clients. Human Services and the Afrocentric Paradigm provides you with a concrete discription of how the Afrocentric model can be applied in human services to help people of all races and ethnicities. You will expand and diversify your knowledge base in human services by understanding the cultural values, traditions, and experiences of people of African ancestry. Some of the issues and concepts in the Afrocentric paradigm that you will explore are: defining the Afrocentric worldview, complete with a discussion of its philosophical assumptions and its shortcomings understanding traditional helping assumptions and methods of West African societies and how these have influenced the helping strategies of African-Americans exploring the strengths and weaknesses of some early African-American human service scholars, with special concern placed on their rejection of traditional African methods in favor of Eurocentric ideas resolving youth violence and helping people with substance abuse problems examining Afrocentric assumptions about resource distribution, morality, and societal relationships identifying organizational and conceptual differences in Eurocentric and Afrocentric paradigms creating organizational empowerment and an enhanced work environment via the Afrocentric paradigm Human Services and the Afrocentric Paradigm will help you understand, solve, and prevent problems that are confronted by several races, especially individuals of African descent. This timely and relevant worldview is thoroughly explained to assist you in better serving people of color. The Afrocentric paradigm will help human services practitioners, administrators, policy advocates, analysts, educators, and black studies professors and students achieve educational and treatment objectives by showing you the importance of various cultural values and how to integrate them to make a difference!

Globalization and Cyberculture

Globalization and Cyberculture
Author: Kehbuma Langmia
Pages: 136
ISBN: 9783319475844
Available:
Release: 2016-12-20
Editor: Springer
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

This book argues for hybridity of Western and African cultures within cybercultural and subcultural forms of communication. Kehbuma Langmia argues that when both Western and African cultures merge together through new forms of digital communication, marginalized populations in Africa are able to embrace communication, which could help in the socio-cultural and political development of the continent. On the other hand, the book also engages Richard McPhail’s Electronic Colonization Theory in order to demonstrate how developing areas such as Africa experience a new form of imperialistic subjugation because of electronic and digital communication. Globalization and Cyberculture illustrates how new forms of communication inculcate age-old traditional forms of communications into Africa’s cyberculture while complicating notions of identity, dependency, and the digital divide gap.

Fighting for Honor

Fighting for Honor
Author: M. Thomas J. Desch-Obi
Pages: 346
ISBN: 1570037183
Available:
Release: 2008
Editor: Univ of South Carolina Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

A groundbreaking investigation into the migration of martial arts techniques across continents and centuries

The Tension Between Culture and Human Rights

The Tension Between Culture and Human Rights
Author: Vishanthie Sewpaul,Linda Kreitzer,Tanusha Raniga
Pages: 392
ISBN: 1773851829
Available:
Release: 2021-04-15
Editor: Unknown
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Cultural practices have the potential to cause human suffering. The Tension Between Culture and Human Rights critically interrogates the relationship between culture and human rights across Africa and offers strategies for pedagogy and practice that social workers and educators may use. Drawing on Afrocentricity and emancipatory social work as antidotes to colonial power and dehumanization, this collection challenges cultural practices that violate human rights, and the dichotomous and taken-for-granted assumptions in the cultural representations between the West and the Rest of the world. Engaging critically with cultural traditions while affirming Indigenous knowledge and practices, it is unafraid to deal frankly with uncomfortable truths. Each chapter explores a specific aspect of African cultural norms and practices and their impacts on human rights and human dignity, paying special attention to the intersections of politics, economics, race, class, gender, and cultural expression. Going beyond analysis, this collection offers a range of practical approaches to understanding and intervention rooted in emancipatory social work. It offers a pathway to develop critical reflexivity and to reframe epistemologies for education and practice. This is essential reading not only for students and practitioners of social work, but for anyone seeking a deeper understanding of African cultures and practices.

Afrocentric Interpretations of Jesus and the Gospel Tradition

Afrocentric Interpretations of Jesus and the Gospel Tradition
Author: Thomas Bowie Slater
Pages: 260
ISBN: 1495502821
Available:
Release: 2014-12-15
Editor: Unknown
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

This collection of essays is an Afrocentric examination into the gospels and Jesus-studies by persons of African descent. The study encourages us to reassess our commonly held beliefs about biblical interpretation by offering us a fresh point of view and different cultural perspective than those that have been developed by traditional Eurocentric research. This work challenges our presuppositions about the Bible and biblical interpretation.

African Literature and the Politics of Culture

African Literature and the Politics of Culture
Author: James Tar Tsaaior
Pages: 240
ISBN: 9781443853828
Available:
Release: 2013-11-01
Editor: Cambridge Scholars Publishing
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

This book essentially negotiates African literature as a veritable site of artistic and cultural production and situates it within the dynamic of postcolonial cultural politics. It critically evaluates African literature as a contour of cultural contestation with the imperial politics of knowledge production about others and as an ideological strategy for knowing them. The book’s main contribution to the critical discourse on African literature and culture inheres in the fact that politics constitutes the enduring concern of society as it re/shapes and over-determines discourses which have continued to remain crucial to societal engineering. It, however, imagines the discursive existence as necessary for the evolving of a dynamic African literary tradition with an abiding fidelity to the verities of history. The book is useful for literary scholars, historians, critics, experts and students of postcolonial/cultural studies as well as general readership interested in African studies.

The African Diaspora

The African Diaspora
Author: Toyin Falola
Pages: 418
ISBN: 9781580464529
Available:
Release: 2013
Editor: University Rochester Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

In this definitive study of the African diaspora in North America, Toyin Falola offers a causal history of the western dispersion of Africans and its effects on the modern world.

Afrocentric Idea Revised

Afrocentric Idea Revised
Author: Molefi Asante
Pages: 256
ISBN: 9781439905623
Available:
Release: 2011-01-19
Editor: Temple University Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Asante's spirited engagement with culture warriors, neocons, and postmodernists updates this classic.

Facing South to Africa

Facing South to Africa
Author: Molefi Kete Asante
Pages: 172
ISBN: 9780739196724
Available:
Release: 2014-08-20
Editor: Lexington Books
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Facing South to Africa is a bold synthesis of the ideas that have made Afrocentric theorists the leading voices of the African renaissance. Written from the vantage point of the philosophical and political discourse that emerged over the past twenty-five years, this is a highly readable and accessible introduction to African social and cultural criticism. Molefi Kete Asante engages in the practice of critical thinking by raising fundamental questions about how Africans view themselves and the world. Tackling the themes of culture, education, social sciences, the university, politics, African unity, and the prospects for peace in Africa, Facing South to Africa is a fresh, daring, and popularizing synthesis of the best critical thought on the issues of modern knowledge. Asante’s plan is to reorient our thinking on Africa by asking questions of Africa and Africans rather than imposing preconceived, external ideas on African issues.