A History of Indigenous Latin America

A History of Indigenous Latin America
Author: René Harder Horst
Pages: 408
ISBN: 9781351856010
Available:
Release: 2020-03-25
Editor: Routledge
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

A History of Indigenous Latin America is a comprehensive introduction to the people who first settled in Latin America, from before the arrival of the Europeans to the present. Indigenous history provides a singular perspective to political, social and economic changes that followed European settlement and the African slave trade in Latin America. Set broadly within a postcolonial theoretical framework and enhanced by anthropology, economics, sociology, and religion, this textbook includes military conflicts and nonviolent resistance, transculturation, labor, political organization, gender, and broad selective accommodation. Uniquely organized into periods of 50 years to facilitate classroom use, it allows students to ground important indigenous historical events and cultural changes within the timeframe of a typical university semester. Supported by images, textboxes, and linked documents in each chapter that aid learning and provide a new perspective that broadly enhances Latin American history and studies, it is the perfect introductory textbook for students.

Contemporary Indigenous Movements in Latin America

Contemporary Indigenous Movements in Latin America
Author: Erick D. Langer
Pages: 220
ISBN: 9780742575066
Available:
Release: 2003-03-01
Editor: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

The efforts of Indians in Latin America have gained momentum and garnered increasing attention in the last decade as they claim rights to their land and demand full participation in the political process. This issue is of rising importance as ecological concerns and autochtonous movements gain a foothold in Latin America, transforming the political landscape into one in which multiethnic democracies hold sway. In some cases, these movements have led to violent outbursts that severely affected some nations, such as the 1992 and 1994 Indian uprisings in Ecuador. In most cases, however, grassroots efforts have realized success without bloodshed. An Aymara Indian, head of an indigenous-rights political party, became Vice President of Bolivia. Brazilian lands are being set aside for indigenous groups not as traditional reservations where the government attempts to 'civilize' the hunters and gatherers, but where the government serves only to keep loggers, gold miners, and other interlopers out of tribal lands. Contemporary Indigenous Movements in Latin America is a collection of essays compiled by Professor Erick D. Langer that brings together-for the first time-contributions on indigenous movements throughout Latin America from all regions. Focusing on the 1990s, Professor Langer illustrates the range and increasing significance of the Indian movements in Latin America. The volume addresses the ways in which Indians have confronted the political, social, and economic problems they face today, and shows the diversity of the movements, both in lowlands and in highlands, tribal peoples, and peasants. The book presents an analytical overview of these movements, as well as a vision of how and why they have become so important in the late twentieth century. Contemporary Indigenous Movements in Latin America is important for those interested in Latin American studies, including Latin American civilization, Latin American anthropology, contemporary issues in Latin America, and ethnic studies.

Indigenous Peoples In Latin America

Indigenous Peoples In Latin America
Author: Hector Diaz Polanco
Pages: 176
ISBN: 9780429979491
Available:
Release: 2018-03-05
Editor: Routledge
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

This book deals with the perennial tensions between ethnic groups and the modern nation-state and does so from the perspective of a leading Mexican anthropologist with deep and long experience in these matters. As such, it is both a superb introduction to the basic issues and a presentation of the author's own original contributions. The appearance of this book in English gives North American readers access to these important and political currents in Latin American anthropology and political economy. It is required reading for anyone wishing to understand the current recrudescence of indigenous peoples at this moment in history?when conventional wisdom had predicted its demise.

Weaving the Past

Weaving the Past
Author: Susan Kellogg
Pages: 352
ISBN: 0198040423
Available:
Release: 2005-09-02
Editor: Oxford University Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Weaving the Past offers a comprehensive and interdisciplinary history of Latin America's indigenous women. While the book concentrates on native women in Mesoamerica and the Andes, it covers indigenous people in other parts of South and Central America, including lowland peoples in and beyond Brazil, and Afro-indigenous peoples, such as the Garifuna, of Central America. Drawing on primary and secondary sources, it argues that change, not continuity, has been the norm for indigenous peoples whose resilience in the face of complex and long-term patterns of cultural change is due in no small part to the roles, actions, and agency of women. The book provides broad coverage of gender roles in native Latin America over many centuries, drawing upon a range of evidence from archaeology, anthropology, religion, and politics. Primary and secondary sources include chronicles, codices, newspaper articles, and monographic work on specific regions. Arguing that Latin America's indigenous women were the critical force behind the more important events and processes of Latin America's history, Kellogg interweaves the region's history of family, sexual, and labor history with the origins of women's power in prehispanic, colonial, and modern South and Central America. Shying away from interpretations that treat women as house bound and passive, the book instead emphasizes women's long history of performing labor, being politically active, and contributing to, even supporting, family and community well-being.

Weaving the Past

Weaving the Past
Author: Susan Kellogg
Pages: 338
ISBN: 0195183282
Available:
Release: 2005
Editor: Oxford University Press, USA
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Extrait de la couverture : "Weaving the past is the first comprehensive history of Latin america's indeginous women. Concentrating mainly on native women in Mesoamerica and the Andes, Susan Kellogg also uncovers the history of indigenous people in other parts of South and Central America, including lowlands in and beyond Brazil, and Afro.indigenous peoples, such as Garifuna of Central America. Common to these diverse peoples has been women's long history of labor and industry, political activism, and family and community sustenance."

Tourism and Indigenous Heritage in Latin America

Tourism and Indigenous Heritage in Latin America
Author: Casper Jacobsen
Pages: 194
ISBN: 9781351614771
Available:
Release: 2018-08-23
Editor: Routledge
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Following the surge of regional multiculturalism and indigenous political mobilization, how are indigenous Latin Americans governed today? Addressing the Mexican flagship tourist initiative of ‘Magical Villages,’ this book shows how government tourism programs do more than craft appealing tourist experiences from ideas of indigeneity, tradition, and heritage. Rather, heritage-centered tourism and multiculturalism are fusing into a strategy of government set to tame and steer indigenous spaces of negotiation by offering alternative multicultural national self-images, which trigger new modes of national belonging and participation, without challenging structural political and social asymmetries. By examining contemporary Mexican tourism policies and multiculturalist ideals through policy analysis and ethnographic research in a mestizo municipalcapital in a majority indigenous Nahua municipality, this book shows how mestizo nationalism is regenerated in tourism as part of a neoliberal governmentality framework. The book demonstrates how tourism initiatives that center on indigenous cultural heritage and recognition do not self-evidently empower indigenous citizens, and may pave the way for extracting indigenous heritage as a national resource to the benefit of local elites and tourist visitors. This work is of key interest to researchers, advanced students, and critically engaged practitioners in the fields of Latin American studies, indigenous studies, social anthropology, critical heritage studies, and tourism.

Indigenous Languages Politics and Authority in Latin America

Indigenous Languages  Politics  and Authority in Latin America
Author: Alan Durston,Bruce Mannheim
Pages: 278
ISBN: 9780268103729
Available:
Release: 2018-05-30
Editor: University of Notre Dame Pess
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

This volume makes a vital and original contribution to a topic that lies at the intersection of the fields of history, anthropology, and linguistics. The book is the first to consider indigenous languages as vehicles of political orders in Latin America from the sixteenth century to the present, across regional and national contexts, including Peru, Mexico, Guatemala, and Paraguay. The chapters focus on languages that have been prominent in multiethnic colonial and national societies and are well represented in the written record: Guarani, Quechua, some of the Mayan languages, Nahuatl, and other Mesoamerican languages. The contributors put into dialogue the questions and methodologies that have animated anthropological and historical approaches to the topic, including ethnohistory, philology, language politics and ideologies, sociolinguistics, pragmatics, and metapragmatics. Some of the historical chapters deal with how political concepts and discourses were expressed in indigenous languages, while others focus on multilingualism and language hierarchies, where some indigenous languages, or language varieties, acquired a special status as mediums of written communication and as elite languages. The ethnographic chapters show how the deployment of distinct linguistic varieties in social interaction lays bare the workings of social differentiation and social hierarchy. Contributors: Alan Durston, Bruce Mannheim, Sabine MacCormack, Bas van Doesburg, Camilla Townsend, Capucine Boidin, Angélica Otazú Melgarejo, Judith M. Maxwell, Margarita Huayhua.

The Cambridge History of Latin America

The Cambridge History of Latin America
Author: Leslie Bethell
Pages: 945
ISBN: 0521232244
Available:
Release: 1985-07-11
Editor: Cambridge University Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Volume III looks at the period of history in Latin America from independence to c.1870.

Alcohol in Latin America

Alcohol in Latin America
Author: Gretchen Pierce,Áurea Toxqui
Pages: 320
ISBN: 9780816599004
Available:
Release: 2014-03-27
Editor: University of Arizona Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Aguardente, chicha, pulque, vino—no matter whether it’s distilled or fermented, alcohol either brings people together or pulls them apart. Alcohol in Latin America is a sweeping examination of the deep reasons why. This book takes an in-depth look at the social and cultural history of alcohol and its connection to larger processes in Latin America. Using a painting depicting a tavern as a metaphor, the authors explore the disparate groups and individuals imbibing as an introduction to their study. In so doing, they reveal how alcohol production, consumption, and regulation have been intertwined with the history of Latin America since the pre-Columbian era. Alcohol in Latin America is the first interdisciplinary study to examine the historic role of alcohol across Latin America and over a broad time span. Six locations—the Andean region, Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Guatemala, and Mexico—are seen through the disciplines of anthropology, archaeology, art history, ethnohistory, history, and literature. Organized chronologically beginning with the pre-colonial era, it features five chapters on Mesoamerica and five on South America, each focusing on various aspects of a dozen different kinds of beverages. An in-depth look at how alcohol use in Latin America can serve as a lens through which race, class, gender, and state-building, among other topics, can be better understood, Alcohol in Latin America shows the historic influence of alcohol production and consumption in the region and how it is intimately connected to the larger forces of history.

Indigenous Movements and Their Critics

Indigenous Movements and Their Critics
Author: Kay B. Warren
Pages: 288
ISBN: 0691058822
Available:
Release: 1998-12-27
Editor: Princeton University Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

In this first book-length treatment of Maya intellectuals in national and community affairs in Guatemala, Kay Warren presents an ethnographic account of Pan-Maya cultural activism through the voices, writings, and actions of its participants. Challenging the belief that indigenous movements emerge as isolated, politically unified fronts, she shows that Pan-Mayanism reflects diverse local, national, and international influences. She explores the movement's attempts to interweave these varied strands into political programs to promote human and cultural rights for Guatemala's indigenous majority and also examines the movement's many domestic and foreign critics. The book focuses on the years of Guatemala's peace process (1987--1996). After the previous ten years of national war and state repression, the Maya movement reemerged into public view to press for institutional reform in the schools and courts and for the officialization of a "multicultural, ethnically plural, and multilingual" national culture. In particular, Warren examines a group of well-known Mayanist antiracism activists--among them, Demetrio Cojt!, Mart!n Chacach, Enrique Sam Colop, Victor Montejo, members of Oxlajuuj Keej Maya' Ajtz'iib', and grassroots intellectuals in the community of San Andr s--to show what is at stake for them personally and how they have worked to promote the revitalization of Maya language and culture. Pan-Mayanism's critics question its tactics, see it as threatening their own achievements, or even as dangerously polarizing national society. This book highlights the crucial role that Mayanist intellectuals have come to play in charting paths to multicultural democracy in Guatemala and in creating a new parallel middle class.

Queer Natives in Latin America

Queer Natives in Latin America
Author: Fabiano S. Gontijo
Pages: 329
ISBN: 9783030591335
Available:
Release: 2021
Editor: Springer Nature
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Medicine and Public Health in Latin America

Medicine and Public Health in Latin America
Author: Marcos Cueto,Steven Palmer
Pages: 318
ISBN: 9781107023673
Available:
Release: 2014-12-15
Editor: Cambridge University Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

This book provides a clear, broad, and provocative synthesis of the history of Latin American medicine.

Frontiers of Citizenship

Frontiers of Citizenship
Author: Yuko Miki
Pages: 329
ISBN: 9781108417501
Available:
Release: 2018-01-31
Editor: Cambridge University Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

An engaging, innovative history of Brazil's black and indigenous people that redefines our understanding of slavery, citizenship, and national identity. Focuses on the interconnected histories of black and indigenous people on Brazil's Atlantic frontier, and makes a case for the frontier as a key space that defined the boundaries and limitations of Brazilian citizenship.

Open Veins of Latin America

Open Veins of Latin America
Author: Eduardo Galeano
Pages: 317
ISBN: 9780853459903
Available:
Release: 1997
Editor: NYU Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

[In this book, the author's] analysis of the effects and causes of capitalist underdevelopment in Latin America present [an] account of ... Latin American history. [The author] shows how foreign companies reaped huge profits through their operations in Latin America. He explains the politics of the Latin American bourgeoisies and their subservience to foreign powers, and how they interacted to create increasingly unequal capitalist societies in Latin America.-Back cover.

The Struggle for Indigenous Rights in Latin America

The Struggle for Indigenous Rights in Latin America
Author: Nancy Grey Postero,León Zamosc
Pages: 250
ISBN: 1845190637
Available:
Release: 2004
Editor: Unknown
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

This book examines the struggle for indigenous rights in seven Latin American countries. Initial studies of indigenous movements celebrated the return of the Indians as relevant political actors, often approaching their struggles as expressions of a common, generic agenda. This collection moves the debate forward by acknowledging the extraordinary diversity among the movements' composition, goals, and strategies. By focusing on the factors that shape this diversity, the authors offer a basis for understanding the specificities of converging and diverging patterns across different countries. The volume concludes that the Indian struggles are having a direct impact on the character of democracy, and in the process contribute to the redefinition of Latin American societies as multicultural.

The Oxford Handbook of Latin American History

The Oxford Handbook of Latin American History
Author: Jose C. Moya
Pages: 526
ISBN: 9780195166200
Available:
Release: 2011
Editor: Oxford University Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

This Oxford Handbook comprehensively examines the field of Latin American history.

Early Latin America

Early Latin America
Author: James Lockhart,Stuart B. Schwartz
Pages: 480
ISBN: 0521299292
Available:
Release: 1983-09-30
Editor: Cambridge University Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

A brief general history of Latin America in the period between the European conquest and the independence of the Spanish American countries and Brazil serves as an introduction to this quickly changing field of study.

A Companion to Latin American History

A Companion to Latin American History
Author: Thomas H. Holloway
Pages: 544
ISBN: 144439164X
Available:
Release: 2011-03-21
Editor: John Wiley & Sons
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

The Companion to Latin American History collects the work of leading experts in the field to create a single-source overview of the diverse history and current trends in the study of Latin America. Presents a state-of-the-art overview of the history of Latin America Written by the top international experts in the field 28 chapters come together as a superlative single source of information for scholars and students Recognizes the breadth and diversity of Latin American history by providing systematic chronological and geographical coverage Covers both historical trends and new areas of interest

The Cultural Worlds of the Jesuits in Colonial Latin America

The Cultural Worlds of the Jesuits in Colonial Latin America
Author: Linda Newson
Pages: 200
ISBN: 1908857625
Available:
Release: 2020-06-30
Editor: Institute of Latin American Studies
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

2017 marked the 250-year anniversary of the expulsion of the Jesuits from Spanish territories. The Jesuits made major contributions to the cultural and intellectual life of Latin America. When they were expelled in 1767 the Jesuits were administering over 250,000 Indians in over 200 missions. The Jesuits pioneered interest in indigenous languages and cultures, compiling dictionaries and writing some of the earliest ethnographies of the region. They also explored the region's natural history and made significant contributions to the development of science and medicine. On their estates and in the missions they introduced new plants, livestock, and agricultural techniques, such as irrigation. In addition, they left a lasting legacy on the region's architecture, art, and music. The volume demonstrates the diversity of Jesuit contributions to Latin American culture. Published works often focus on one theme or region that is approached from a particular disciplinary perspective. This volume is therefore unusual in considering not only the range of Jesuit activities but also the diversity of perspectives from which they may be approached. It includes papers from scholars of history, linguistics, religion, art, architecture, cartography, music, medicine and science.

A New History of Modern Latin America

A New History of Modern Latin America
Author: Lawrence A. Clayton,Michael L. Conniff,Susan M. Gauss
Pages: 712
ISBN: 9780520963825
Available:
Release: 2017-08-01
Editor: Univ of California Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

A New History of Modern Latin America provides an engaging and readable narrative history of the nations of Latin America from the Wars of Independence in the nineteenth century to the democratic turn in the twenty-first. This new edition of a well-known text has been revised and updated to include the most recent interpretations of major themes in the economic, social, and cultural history of the region to show the unity of the Latin America experience while exploring the diversity of the region’s geography, peoples, and cultures. It also presents substantial new material on women, gender, and race in the region. Each chapter begins with primary documents, offering glimpses into moments in history and setting the scene for the chapter, and concludes with timelines and key words to reinforce content. Discussion questions are included to help students with research assignments and papers. Both professors and students will find its narrative, chronological approach a useful guide to the history of this important area of the world.