Facing East from Indian Country

Facing East from Indian Country
Author: Dr Daniel K Richter
Pages: 317
ISBN: 9780674042728
Available:
Release: 2009-06
Editor: Harvard University Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

In the beginning, North America was Indian country. But only in the beginning. After the opening act of the great national drama, Native Americans yielded to the westward rush of European settlers. Or so the story usually goes. Yet, for three centuries after Columbus, Native people controlled most of eastern North America and profoundly shaped its destiny. In Facing East from Indian Country, Daniel K. Richter keeps Native people center-stage throughout the story of the origins of the United States. Viewed from Indian country, the sixteenth century was an era in which Native people discovered Europeans and struggled to make sense of a new world. Well into the seventeenth century, the most profound challenges to Indian life came less from the arrival of a relative handful of European colonists than from the biological, economic, and environmental forces the newcomers unleashed. Drawing upon their own traditions, Indian communities reinvented themselves and carved out a place in a world dominated by transatlantic European empires. In 1776, however, when some of Britain's colonists rebelled against that imperial world, they overturned the system that had made Euro-American and Native coexistence possible. Eastern North America only ceased to be an Indian country because the revolutionaries denied the continent's first peoples a place in the nation they were creating. In rediscovering early America as Indian country, Richter employs the historian's craft to challenge cherished assumptions about times and places we thought we knew well, revealing Native American experiences at the core of the nation's birth and identity.

Facing East from Indian Country

Facing East from Indian Country
Author: Daniel K. Richter
Pages: 317
ISBN: 143529775X
Available:
Release: 2008-06-05
Editor: Unknown
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Discusses the myth of European control over the Native Americans in the sixteenth century, and claims that Native Americans controlled the majority of eastern North America well after Columbus' arrival, having only to adjust to their presence.

Facing East from Indian Country

Facing East from Indian Country
Author: Daniel K. Richter
Pages: 317
ISBN: 0674011171
Available:
Release: 2003
Editor: Unknown
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Discusses the myth of European control over the Native Americans in the sixteenth century, and claims that Native Americans controlled the majority of eastern North America well after Columbus' arrival, having only to adjust to their presence.

The Ordeal of the Longhouse

The Ordeal of the Longhouse
Author: Daniel K. Richter
Pages: 454
ISBN: 9780807867914
Available:
Release: 2011-05-01
Editor: UNC Press Books
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Richter examines a wide range of primary documents to survey the responses of the peoples of the Iroquois League--the Mohawks, Oneidas, Onondagas, Cayugas, Senecas, and Tuscaroras--to the challenges of the European colonialization of North America. He demonstrates that by the early eighteenth century a series of creative adaptations in politics and diplomacy allowed the peoples of the Longhouse to preserve their cultural autonomy in a land now dominated by foreign powers.

A Forest of Time

A Forest of Time
Author: Peter Nabokov
Pages: 246
ISBN: 0521568749
Available:
Release: 2002-02-25
Editor: Cambridge University Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Publisher Description

New Worlds for All

New Worlds for All
Author: Colin G. Calloway
Pages: 264
ISBN: 9781421411217
Available:
Release: 2013-10-01
Editor: JHU Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

The second edition of New Worlds for All incorporates fifteen years of additional scholarship on Indian-European relations, such as the role of gender, Indian slavery, relationships with African Americans, and new understandings of frontier society.

Native America and the Question of Genocide

Native America and the Question of Genocide
Author: Alex Alvarez
Pages: 222
ISBN: 9781442225824
Available:
Release: 2014-03-14
Editor: Rowman & Littlefield
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Did Native Americans suffer genocide? This controversial question lies at the heart of Native America and the Question of Genocide. After reviewing the various meanings of the word “genocide,” author Alex Alvarez examines a range of well-known examples, such as the Sand Creek Massacre and the Long Walk of the Navajo, to determine where genocide occurred and where it did not. The book explores the destructive beliefs of the European settlers and then looks at topics including disease, war, and education through the lens of genocide. Native America and the Question of Genocide shows the diversity of Native American experiences postcontact and illustrates how tribes relied on ever-evolving and changing strategies of confrontation and accommodation, depending on their location, the time period, and individuals involved, and how these often resulted in very different experiences. Alvarez treats this difficult subject with sensitivity and uncovers the complex realities of this troubling period in American history.

Native Americans Pennsylvania

Native Americans  Pennsylvania
Author: Daniel K. Richter
Pages: 100
ISBN: 1932304290
Available:
Release: 2005-01-01
Editor: Unknown
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Violence over the Land

Violence over the Land
Author: Ned BLACKHAWK
Pages: 384
ISBN: 9780674020993
Available:
Release: 2009-06-30
Editor: Harvard University Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

"Blackhawk, a Western Shoshone himself, does not portray the natives as victims. Instead, he demonstrates that their perseverance and ability to adapt to changing conditions over the last two centuries allowed them to help shape the world around them ... This is one of the finest studies available on native peoples of the ggreat basin region." John Burch, Library Journal, from the bookjacket.

How the Indians Lost Their Land

How the Indians Lost Their Land
Author: Stuart BANNER
Pages: 352
ISBN: 9780674020535
Available:
Release: 2009-06-30
Editor: Harvard University Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Between the early seventeenth century and the early twentieth, nearly all the land in the United States was transferred from American Indians to whites. How did Indians actually lose their land? Stuart Banner argues that neither simple coercion nor simple consent reflects the complicated legal history of land transfers. Instead, time, place, and the balance of power between Indians and settlers decided the outcome of land struggles.

Farewell My Nation

 Farewell  My Nation
Author: Philip Weeks
Pages: 368
ISBN: 9781118976777
Available:
Release: 2016-02-16
Editor: John Wiley & Sons
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

The fully updated third edition of "Farewell, My Nation" considers the complex and often tragic relationships between American Indians, white Americans, and the U.S. government during the nineteenth century, as the government tried to find ways to deal with social and political questions about how to treat America's indigenous population. Updated to include new scholarship that has appeared since the publication of the second edition as well as additional primary source material Examines the cultural and material impact of Western expansion on the indigenous peoples of the United States, guiding the reader through the significant changes in Indian-U.S. policy over the course of the nineteenth century Outlines the efficacy and outcomes of the three principal policies toward American Indians undertaken in varying degrees by the U.S. government - Separation, Concentration, and Americanization - and interrogates their repercussions Provides detailed descriptions, chronology and analysis of the Plains Wars supported by supplementary maps and illustrations

The Saltwater Frontier

The Saltwater Frontier
Author: Andrew Lipman
Pages: 360
ISBN: 9780300216691
Available:
Release: 2015-11-03
Editor: Yale University Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Andrew Lipman’s eye-opening first book is the previously untold story of how the ocean became a “frontier” between colonists and Indians. When the English and Dutch empires both tried to claim the same patch of coast between the Hudson River and Cape Cod, the sea itself became the arena of contact and conflict. During the violent European invasions, the region’s Algonquian-speaking Natives were navigators, boatbuilders, fishermen, pirates, and merchants who became active players in the emergence of the Atlantic World. Drawing from a wide range of English, Dutch, and archeological sources, Lipman uncovers a new geography of Native America that incorporates seawater as well as soil. Looking past Europeans’ arbitrary land boundaries, he reveals unseen links between local episodes and global events on distant shores. Lipman’s book “successfully redirects the way we look at a familiar history” (Neal Salisbury, Smith College). Extensively researched and elegantly written, this latest addition to Yale’s seventeenth-century American history list brings the early years of New England and New York vividly to life.

Masters of Empire

Masters of Empire
Author: Michael McDonnell
Pages: 416
ISBN: 9780374714185
Available:
Release: 2015-12-08
Editor: Hill and Wang
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

A radical reinterpretation of early American history from a native point of view In Masters of Empire, the historian Michael McDonnell reveals the pivotal role played by the native peoples of the Great Lakes in the history of North America. Though less well known than the Iroquois or Sioux, the Anishinaabeg who lived along Lakes Michigan and Huron were equally influential. McDonnell charts their story, and argues that the Anishinaabeg have been relegated to the edges of history for too long. Through remarkable research into 19th-century Anishinaabeg-authored chronicles, McDonnell highlights the long-standing rivalries and relationships among the great tribes of North America, and how Europeans often played only a minor role in their stories. McDonnell reminds us that it was native people who possessed intricate and far-reaching networks of trade and kinship, of which the French and British knew little. And as empire encroached upon their domain, the Anishinaabeg were often the ones doing the exploiting. By dictating terms at trading posts and frontier forts, they played a crucial role in the making of early America. Through vivid depictions of early conflicts, the French and Indian War, and Pontiac's Rebellion, all from a native perspective, Masters of Empire overturns our assumptions about colonial America and the origins of the Revolutionary War. By calling attention to the Great Lakes as a crucible of culture and conflict, McDonnell reimagines the landscape of American history.

Trade Land Power

Trade  Land  Power
Author: Daniel K. Richter
Pages: 328
ISBN: 9780812208306
Available:
Release: 2013-04-24
Editor: University of Pennsylvania Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

In this sweeping collection of essays, one of America's leading colonial historians reinterprets the struggle between Native peoples and Europeans in terms of how each understood the material basis of power. Throughout the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries in eastern North America, Natives and newcomers alike understood the close relationship between political power and control of trade and land, but they did so in very different ways. For Native Americans, trade was a collective act. The alliances that made a people powerful became visible through material exchanges that forged connections among kin groups, villages, and the spirit world. The land itself was often conceived as a participant in these transactions through the blessings it bestowed on those who gave in return. For colonizers, by contrast, power tended to grow from the individual accumulation of goods and landed property more than from collective exchange—from domination more than from alliance. For many decades, an uneasy balance between the two systems of power prevailed. Tracing the messy process by which global empires and their colonial populations could finally abandon compromise and impose their definitions on the continent, Daniel K. Richter casts penetrating light on the nature of European colonization, the character of Native resistance, and the formative roles that each played in the origins of the United States.

Indian Resilience and Rebuilding

Indian Resilience and Rebuilding
Author: Donald L. Fixico
Pages: 296
ISBN: 9780816530649
Available:
Release: 2013-10-10
Editor: University of Arizona Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Indian Resilience and Rebuilding provides an Indigenous view of the last one-hundred years of Native history and guides readers through a century of achievements. It examines the progress that Indians have accomplished in rebuilding their nations in the 20th century, revealing how Native communities adapted to the cultural and economic pressures in modern America. Donald Fixico examines issues like land allotment, the Indian New Deal, termination and relocation, Red Power and self-determination, casino gaming, and repatriation. He applies ethnohistorical analysis and political economic theory to provide a multi-layered approach that ultimately shows how Native people reinvented themselves in order to rebuild their nations. Ê Fixico identifies the tools to this empowerment such as education, navigation within cultural systems, modern Indian leadership, and indigenized political economy. He explains how these tools helped Indian communities to rebuild their nations. Fixico constructs an Indigenous paradigm of Native ethos and reality that drives Indian modern political economies heading into the twenty-first century. This illuminating and comprehensive analysis of Native nationÕs resilience in the twentieth century demonstrates how Native Americans reinvented themselves, rebuilt their nations, and ultimately became major forces in the United States. Indian Resilience and Rebuilding, redefines how modern American history can and should be told.

Peoples of a Spacious Land

Peoples of a Spacious Land
Author: Gloria L. Main
Pages: 334
ISBN: 0674040465
Available:
Release: 2004-10-25
Editor: Harvard University Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

In this book about families--those of the various native peoples of southern New England and those of the English settlers and their descendants--Gloria Main compares the ways in which the two cultures went about solving common human problems. Using original sources--diaries, inventories, wills, court records--as well as the findings of demographers, ethnologists, and cultural anthropologists, she compares the family life of the English colonists with the lives of comparable groups remaining in England and of native Americans. She looks at social organization, patterns of work, gender relations, sexual practices, childbearing and childrearing, demographic changes, and ways of dealing with sickness and death. Main finds that the transplanted English family system produced descendants who were unusually healthy for the times and spectacularly fecund. Large families and steady population growth led to the creation of new towns and the enlargement of old ones with inevitably adverse consequences for the native Americans in the area. Main follows the two cultures into the eighteenth century and makes clear how the promise of perpetual accessions of new land eventually extended Puritan family culture across much of the North American continent.

Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee

Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee
Author: Dee Brown
Pages: 494
ISBN: 9781453274149
Available:
Release: 2012-10-23
Editor: Open Road Media
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

The “fascinating” #1 New York Times bestseller that awakened the world to the destruction of American Indians in the nineteenth-century West (The Wall Street Journal). First published in 1970, Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee generated shockwaves with its frank and heartbreaking depiction of the systematic annihilation of American Indian tribes across the western frontier. In this nonfiction account, Dee Brown focuses on the betrayals, battles, and massacres suffered by American Indians between 1860 and 1890. He tells of the many tribes and their renowned chiefs—from Geronimo to Red Cloud, Sitting Bull to Crazy Horse—who struggled to combat the destruction of their people and culture. Forcefully written and meticulously researched, Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee inspired a generation to take a second look at how the West was won. This ebook features an illustrated biography of Dee Brown including rare photos from the author’s personal collection.

Into the American Woods

Into the American Woods
Author: James Hart Merrell
Pages: 463
ISBN: 0393319768
Available:
Release: 2000
Editor: W. W. Norton & Company
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

The bloodshed and hatred of frontier conflict at once made go-betweens obsolete and taught the harsh lesson of the woods: the final incompatibility of colonial and native dreams about the continent they shared. Long erased from history, the go-betweens of early America are recovered here in vivid detail.

American Indian History

American Indian History
Author: Camilla Townsend
Pages: 247
ISBN: 9781405159074
Available:
Release: 2009-04-20
Editor: John Wiley & Sons
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

This Reader from the Uncovering the Past series provides a comprehensive introduction to American Indianhistory. Over 60 primary documents allow the voices of natives toilluminate the American past Includes samples of native languages just above the fulltranslations of particular texts Provides comprehensive introductions and headnotes, as well asimages, an extensive bibliography, and suggestions for furtherresearch Includes such texts as a decoded Maya inscription, letterswritten during the French and Indian War on the distribution ofsmall pox blankets, and a diatribe by General George ArmstrongCuster shortly before he was killed at the Battle of the Little BigHorn

There There

There There
Author: Tommy Orange
Pages: 256
ISBN: 9780771073021
Available:
Release: 2018-06-05
Editor: McClelland & Stewart
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Here is a voice we have never heard--a voice full of poetry and rage, exploding onto the page with stunning urgency and force. Here is a story of several people, each of whom has private reasons for travelling to the Big Oakland Powwow. Jacquie Red Feather is newly sober and trying to make it back to the family she left behind in shame. Dene Oxendene is pulling his life together after his uncle's death and has come to work at the powwow to honour his uncle's memory. Opal Viola Victoria Bear Shield has come to watch her nephew Orvil Red Feather, who has taught himself traditional Indian dance through YouTube videos and has come to the powwow to dance in public for the very first time. There will be glorious communion, and a spectacle of sacred tradition and pageantry. And there will be sacrifice, and heroism, and unspeakable loss. Fierce, angry, funny, heartbreaking, There There is a relentlessly paced multi-generational story about violence and recovery, memory and identity, and the beauty and despair woven into the history of a nation and its people. An unforgettable debut.