City of Sedition

City of Sedition
Author: John Strausbaugh
Pages: 352
ISBN: 9781455584192
Available:
Release: 2016-08-02
Editor: Twelve
Language: un

Explanation of the Book:

WINNER OF THE FLETCHER PRATT AWARD FOR BEST NON-FICTION BOOK OF 2016 In a single definitive narrative, CITY OF SEDITION tells the spellbinding story of the huge-and hugely conflicted-role New York City played in the Civil War. No city was more of a help to Abraham Lincoln and the Union war effort, or more of a hindrance. No city raised more men, money, and materiel for the war, and no city raised more hell against it. It was a city of patriots, war heroes, and abolitionists, but simultaneously a city of antiwar protest, draft resistance, and sedition. Without his New York supporters, it's highly unlikely Lincoln would have made it to the White House. Yet, because of the city's vital and intimate business ties to the Cotton South, the majority of New Yorkers never voted for him and were openly hostile to him and his politics. Throughout the war New York City was a nest of antiwar "Copperheads" and a haven for deserters and draft dodgers. New Yorkers would react to Lincoln's wartime policies with the deadliest rioting in American history. The city's political leaders would create a bureaucracy solely devoted to helping New Yorkers evade service in Lincoln's army. Rampant war profiteering would create an entirely new class of New York millionaires, the "shoddy aristocracy." New York newspapers would be among the most vilely racist and vehemently antiwar in the country. Some editors would call on their readers to revolt and commit treason; a few New Yorkers would answer that call. They would assist Confederate terrorists in an attempt to burn their own city down, and collude with Lincoln's assassin. Here in CITY OF SEDITION, a gallery of fascinating New Yorkers comes to life, the likes of Horace Greeley, Walt Whitman, Julia Ward Howe, Boss Tweed, Thomas Nast, Matthew Brady, and Herman Melville. This book follows the fortunes of these figures and chronicles how many New Yorkers seized the opportunities the conflict presented to amass capital, create new industries, and expand their markets, laying the foundation for the city's-and the nation's-growth.

Victory City

Victory City
Author: John Strausbaugh
Pages: 384
ISBN: 9781455567461
Available:
Release: 2018-12-04
Editor: Twelve
Language: un

Explanation of the Book:

From John Strausbaugh, author of City of Sedition and The Village, comes the definitive history of Gotham during the World War II era. New York City during World War II wasn't just a place of servicemen, politicians, heroes, G.I. Joes and Rosie the Riveters, but also of quislings and saboteurs; of Nazi, Fascist, and Communist sympathizers; of war protesters and conscientious objectors; of gangsters and hookers and profiteers; of latchkey kids and bobby-soxers, poets and painters, atomic scientists and atomic spies. While the war launched and leveled nations, spurred economic growth, and saw the rise and fall of global Fascism, New York City would eventually emerge as the new capital of the world. From the Gilded Age to VJ-Day, an array of fascinating New Yorkers rose to fame, from Mayor Fiorello La Guardia to Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt, Langston Hughes to Joe Louis, to Robert Moses and Joe DiMaggio. In Victory City, John Strausbaugh returns to tell the story of New York City's war years with the same richness, depth, and nuance he brought to his previous books, City of Sedition and The Village, providing readers with a groundbreaking new look into the greatest city on earth during the most transformative -- and costliest -- war in human history.

Sedition

Sedition
Author: Katharine Grant
Pages: 307
ISBN: 9780805099928
Available:
Release: 2014-04
Editor: Macmillan
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

The efforts of four late-18th-century nouveau riche fathers to win titled husbands for their piano-playing daughters is complicated by a lascivious piano teacher, a piano maker's jealous daughter and one girl's own plans about marriage. A first adult novel by the award-winning author of the DeGranville Trilogy. 50,000 first printing.

Darkest Before Dawn

Darkest Before Dawn
Author: Clemens P. Work
Pages: 318
ISBN: 0826337937
Available:
Release: 2006
Editor: UNM Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Today's threats against freedom of speech echo the hysteria of World War I, when Americans went to prison for dissent. This cautionary tale focuses on events in Montana and the West that led to the suspension of this crucial right.

Sedition in Liberal Democracies

Sedition in Liberal Democracies
Author: Anushka Singh
Pages: 406
ISBN: 9780199091829
Available:
Release: 2018-02-16
Editor: Oxford University Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Examining the relationship between sedition and liberal democracies, particularly in India, this book looks at the biography of sedition laws, its contradictory position against free speech, and democratic ethics. Recent sedition cases registered in India show that the law in its wide and diverse deployment was used against agitators in a community-based pro-reservation movement, group of university students for their alleged ‘anti-national’ statements, anti-liquor activists, and anti-nuclear movement, to name a few. Set against its contemporary use, this book has used sedition as a lens to probe the fate of political speech in liberal democracy. The lived reality of the law of sedition in changing anthropological sites is juxtaposed with its positivist existence. Anushka Singh uses a comparative framework keeping in focus the Indian experience backed by fieldwork in Haryana, Maharashtra, and Delhi, and includes a comparative perspective from England, the USA, and Australia to contribute to debates on sedition within liberal democracies at large, especially in the wake of the proliferation of counter-terror legislations.

The Great Repression

The Great Repression
Author: Chitranshul Sinha
Pages: 280
ISBN: 9789353056186
Available:
Release: 2019-08-19
Editor: Penguin Random House India Private Limited
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

The Indian Penal Code was formulated in 1860, three years after the first Indian revolt for independence. It was the country's first-ever codification of offences and penalties. But it was only in 1870 that Section 124A was slipped into Chapter VI ('Of Offences against the State'), defining the offence of 'Sedition' in a statute for the first time in the history of common law. When India became independent in 1947, the Constituent Assembly expressed strong reservations against sedition as a restriction on free speech as it had been used as a weapon against freedom fighters, many of whom were a part of the Assembly. Nehru vocally opposed it. And yet, not only has Section 124A survived, it has been widely used against popular movements and individuals speaking up against the establishment. Where did this law come from? How did it evolve? And what place does it have in a mature democracy? Concise, incisive and thoughtful, The Great Repression by Chitranshul Sinha, an advocate on record of the Supreme Court of India, tells the story of this outdated colonial-era law.

The Divided City

The Divided City
Author: Nicole Loraux
Pages: 358
ISBN: UVA:X004591361
Available:
Release: 2002
Editor: Unknown
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

An exploration of the roles of conflict and forgetting in ancient Athens.

Criminal Dissent

Criminal Dissent
Author: Wendell Bird
Pages: 512
ISBN: 9780674243880
Available:
Release: 2020-01-07
Editor: Harvard University Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

The prosecution of dissent under the Alien and Sedition Acts affected far more people than previously realized. It also provoked the first battle over the Bill of Rights. Wendell Bird provides the definitive account of a dark moment in U.S. history, reminding us that expressive freedom and opposition politics are essential to a stable democracy.

The City of The Sun

The City of The Sun
Author: Tommaso Campanella
Pages: 329
ISBN: PKEY:SMP2200000182531
Available:
Release: 2020-10-07
Editor: Strelbytskyy Multimedia Publishing
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

“The City of the Sun” is a philosophical work by the Italian Dominican philosopher Tommaso Campanella. It is an important early utopian work. The book is presented as a dialogue between "a Grandmaster of the Knights Hospitaller and a Genoese Sea-Captain". Inspired by Plato's Republic and the description of Atlantis in Timaeus, it describes a theocratic society where goods, women and children are held in common. One of the most significant aspects of this community is the distribution of work. Once again Campanella engages in an explicit polemic with Aristotle, who had excluded artisans, peasants and those involved in manual labor from the category of full citizenship and from the highest levels of virtue.

The Alien and Sedition Acts of 1798

The Alien and Sedition Acts of 1798
Author: Terri Diane Halperin
Pages: 168
ISBN: 9781421419701
Available:
Release: 2016-06-15
Editor: JHU Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Touching on the major sedition trials while expanding the discussion beyond the usual focus on freedom of speech and the press to include the treatment of immigrants, Halperin’s book provides a window through which readers can explore the meaning of freedom of speech, immigration, citizenship, the public sphere, the Constitution, and the Union.

A Strong West Wind

A Strong West Wind
Author: Gail Caldwell
Pages: 256
ISBN: 9780307430472
Available:
Release: 2007-12-18
Editor: Random House
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

In this exquisitely rendered memoir set on the high plains of Texas, Pulitzer Prize winner Gail Caldwell transforms into art what it is like to come of age in a particular time and place. A Strong West Wind begins in the 1950s in the wilds of the Texas Panhandle–a place of both boredom and beauty, its flat horizons broken only by oil derricks, grain elevators, and church steeples. Its story belongs to a girl who grew up surrounded by dust storms and cattle ranches and summer lightning, who took refuge from the vastness of the land and the ever-present wind by retreating into books. What she found there, from renegade women to men who lit out for the territory, turned out to offer a blueprint for her own future. Caldwell would grow up to become a writer, but first she would have to fall in love with a man who was every mother’s nightmare, live through the anguish and fire of the Vietnam years, and defy the father she adored, who had served as a master sergeant in the Second World War. A Strong West Wind is a memoir of culture and history–of fathers and daughters, of two world wars and the passionate rebellions of the sixties. But it is also about the mythology of place and the evolution of a sensibility: about how literature can shape and even anticipate a life. Caldwell possesses the extraordinary ability to illuminate the desires, stories, and lives of ordinary people. Written with humanity, urgency, and beautiful restraint, A Strong West Wind is a magical and unforgettable book, destined to become an American classic.

City of Protest A Recent History of Dissent in Hong Kong Penguin Specials

City of Protest  A Recent History of Dissent in Hong Kong  Penguin Specials
Author: Antony Dapiran
Pages: 134
ISBN: 9781760144005
Available:
Release: 2017-07-01
Editor: Penguin Group Australia
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

From the turbulent 1960s until today, Hong Kong has been a city shaped by civil disobedience. The latest wave of protests in Hong Kong’s long history of public dissent culminated in the Occupy Central movement of 2014. What emerges from these grassroots movements is a unique Hong Kong identity, one shaped neither by Britain nor China. An insightful exploration of the historical and social stimuli and implications of civil disobedience, City of Protest offers a compelling look at the often-fraught relationship between politics and belonging, and a city’s struggle to assert itself.

Mexico Unconquered

Mexico Unconquered
Author: John Gibler
Pages: 356
ISBN: 9780872866980
Available:
Release: 2015-09-28
Editor: City Lights Publishers
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Mexico Unconquered is an evocative report on the powers of violence and corruption in Mexico and the rebel underdogs who put their lives on the line to build justice from the ground up. Mexico Unconquered probes the overwhelming divisions in contemporary Mexico, home to the world’s richest man, Carlos Slim, and to destitute millions. John Gibler weaves narrative journalism with lyrical descriptions, combining the journalist’s trade of walking the streets and the philosopher’s task of drawing out the tremendous implications of the seemingly mundane. John Gibler has reported for In These Times, Common Dreams, YES! Magazine, ColorLines, and Democracy Now!.

City of Dreams

City of Dreams
Author: Tyler Anbinder
Pages: 768
ISBN: 9780544103856
Available:
Release: 2016-10-18
Editor: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

"Told brilliantly, even unforgettably ... An American story, one that belongs to all of us." — Boston Globe “A richly textured guide to the history of our immigrant nation’s pinnacle immigrant city has managed to enter the stage during an election season that has resurrected this historically fraught topic in all its fierceness.” — New York Times Book Review New York has been America’s city of immigrants for nearly four centuries. Growing from Peter Minuit’s tiny settlement of 1626 to a clamorous metropolis with more than three million immigrants today, the city has always been a magnet for transplants from all over the globe. City of Dreams is the long-overdue, inspiring, and defining account of New York’s immigrants, both famous and forgotten: the young man from the Caribbean who relocated to New York and became a founding father; Russian-born Emma Goldman, who condoned the murder of American industrialists as a means of aiding downtrodden workers; Dominican immigrant Oscar de la Renta, who dressed first ladies from Jackie Kennedy to Michelle Obama. Over ten years in the making, Tyler Anbinder’s story is one of innovators and artists, revolutionaries and rioters, staggering deprivation and soaring triumphs. In so many ways, today’s immigrants are just like those who came to America in centuries past—and their stories have never before been told with such breadth of scope, lavish research, and resounding spirit. “A masterful achievement, City of Dreams is the definitive account of the American origin story, as told through our premier metropolis. Bold, exhaustive, always surprising, Anbinder’s book is a wonderful reminder of how we came to be who we are.” — Timothy Egan, best-selling author of The Immortal Irishman

City Of Crows

City Of Crows
Author: Chris Womersley
Pages: 300
ISBN: 9781760555566
Available:
Release: 2017-08-29
Editor: Picador Australia
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

From award-winning author Chris Womersley comes an extraordinary historical novel set in seventeenth-century Paris "One of the unrepentantly daring and original talents in the landscape of Australian fiction" Sydney Morning Herald A woman's heart contains all things ... France, 1673. Desperate to save herself and her only surviving child from an outbreak of plague, the widow Charlotte Picot flees her village to seek sanctuary in Lyon. But, waylaid on the road by slavers, young Nicolas is stolen and his mother left for dead. Charlotte fears the boy has been taken to Paris for sale, for it is well known there is no corruption in a man's heart that cannot be found in that terrible City of Crows. Yet this is not only a story of Paris and its streets thronged with preachers, troubadours and rogues. It is also the tale of a woman who calls herself a sorceress and a demon who thinks he is a man ... MORE PRAISE FOR CITY OF CROWS "Womersley is an astute observer of human nature; his dialogue is sharp; his prose sings. His seventeenth-century Paris is a stinking cesspool of debauchery: Hieronymus Bosch in literary form. This book is fabulous." Readings "Rooted in historical fact this is a novel that entrances you, bewitches you and keeps you thoroughly enthralled." Pages & Pages

Four Threats

Four Threats
Author: Suzanne Mettler,Robert C. Lieberman
Pages: 304
ISBN: 9781250244437
Available:
Release: 2020-08-11
Editor: St. Martin's Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

An urgent, historically-grounded take on the four major factors that undermine American democracy, and what we can do to address them. While many Americans despair of the current state of U.S. politics, most assume that our system of government and democracy itself are invulnerable to decay. Yet when we examine the past, we find that the United States has undergone repeated crises of democracy, from the earliest days of the republic to the present. In Four Threats, Suzanne Mettler and Robert C. Lieberman explore five moments in history when democracy in the U.S. was under siege: the 1790s, the Civil War, the Gilded Age, the Depression, and Watergate. These episodes risked profound—even fatal—damage to the American democratic experiment. From this history, four distinct characteristics of disruption emerge. Political polarization, racism and nativism, economic inequality, and excessive executive power—alone or in combination—have threatened the survival of the republic, but it has survived—so far. What is unique, and alarming, about the present moment in American politics is that all four conditions exist. This convergence marks the contemporary era as a grave moment for democracy. But history provides a valuable repository from which we can draw lessons about how democracy was eventually strengthened—or weakened—in the past. By revisiting how earlier generations of Americans faced threats to the principles enshrined in the Constitution, we can see the promise and the peril that have led us to today and chart a path toward repairing our civic fabric and renewing democracy.

Gateway to Freedom The Hidden History of the Underground Railroad

Gateway to Freedom  The Hidden History of the Underground Railroad
Author: Eric Foner
Pages: 320
ISBN: 9780393244380
Available:
Release: 2015-01-19
Editor: W. W. Norton & Company
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

The dramatic story of fugitive slaves and the antislavery activists who defied the law to help them reach freedom. More than any other scholar, Eric Foner has influenced our understanding of America's history. Now, making brilliant use of extraordinary evidence, the Pulitzer Prize–winning historian once again reconfigures the national saga of American slavery and freedom. A deeply entrenched institution, slavery lived on legally and commercially even in the northern states that had abolished it after the American Revolution. Slaves could be found in the streets of New York well after abolition, traveling with owners doing business with the city's major banks, merchants, and manufacturers. New York was also home to the North’s largest free black community, making it a magnet for fugitive slaves seeking refuge. Slave catchers and gangs of kidnappers roamed the city, seizing free blacks, often children, and sending them south to slavery. To protect fugitives and fight kidnappings, the city's free blacks worked with white abolitionists to organize the New York Vigilance Committee in 1835. In the 1840s vigilance committees proliferated throughout the North and began collaborating to dispatch fugitive slaves from the upper South, Washington, and Baltimore, through Philadelphia and New York, to Albany, Syracuse, and Canada. These networks of antislavery resistance, centered on New York City, became known as the underground railroad. Forced to operate in secrecy by hostile laws, courts, and politicians, the city’s underground-railroad agents helped more than 3,000 fugitive slaves reach freedom between 1830 and 1860. Until now, their stories have remained largely unknown, their significance little understood. Building on fresh evidence—including a detailed record of slave escapes secretly kept by Sydney Howard Gay, one of the key organizers in New York—Foner elevates the underground railroad from folklore to sweeping history. The story is inspiring—full of memorable characters making their first appearance on the historical stage—and significant—the controversy over fugitive slaves inflamed the sectional crisis of the 1850s. It eventually took a civil war to destroy American slavery, but here at last is the story of the courageous effort to fight slavery by "practical abolition," person by person, family by family.

Black Like You

Black Like You
Author: John Strausbaugh
Pages: 384
ISBN: 9781101216057
Available:
Release: 2007-08-16
Editor: Penguin
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

A refreshingly clearheaded and taboo-breaking look at race relations reveals that American culture is neither Black nor White nor Other, but a mix-a mongrel. Black Like You is an erudite and entertaining exploration of race relations in American popular culture. Particularly compelling is Strausbaugh's eagerness to tackle blackface-a strange, often scandalous, and now taboo entertainment. Although blackface performance came to be denounced as purely racist mockery, and shamefacedly erased from most modern accounts of American cultural history, Black Like You shows that the impact of blackface on American culture was deep and long-lasting. Its influence can be seen in rock and hiphop; in vaudeville, Broadway, and gay drag performances; in Mark Twain and "gangsta lit"; in the earliest filmstrips and the 2004 movie White Chicks; on radio and television; in advertising and product marketing; and even in the way Americans speak. Strausbaugh enlivens themes that are rarely discussed in public, let alone with such candor and vision: - American culture neither conforms to knee-jerk racism nor to knee-jerk political correctness. It is neither Black nor White nor Other, but a mix-a mongrel. - No history is best forgotten, however uncomfortable it may be to remember. The power of blackface to engender mortification and rage in Americans to this day is reason enough to examine what it tells us about our culture and ourselves. - Blackface is still alive. Its impact and descendants-including Black performers in "whiteface"-can be seen all around us today.

Candide

Candide
Author: Voltaire
Pages: 329
ISBN: PKEY:SMP2300000062571
Available:
Release: 2020-02-17
Editor: Strelbytskyy Multimedia Publishing
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Candide is the most read and published work by Voltaire (the real name is François-Marie Arouet). The characters of the story – Candide, his friend Cunégonde and his mentor Pangloss – go around the world; they are present at the Seven Year’s War, seizure of Azov by Russians, Lisbon earthquake, and even visit a fairy-tale land Eldorado...

Pirate Modernity

Pirate Modernity
Author: Ravi Sundaram
Pages: 248
ISBN: 9781134130511
Available:
Release: 2009-07-30
Editor: Routledge
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Using Delhi’s contemporary history as a site for reflection, Pirate Modernity moves from a detailed discussion of the technocratic design of the city by US planners in the 1950s, to the massive expansions after 1977, culminating in the urban crisis of the 1990s. As a practice, pirate modernity is an illicit form of urban globalization. Poorer urban populations increasingly inhabit non-legal spheres: unauthorized neighborhoods, squatter camps and bypass legal technological infrastructures (media, electricity). This pirate culture produces a significant enabling resource for subaltern populations unable to enter the legal city. Equally, this is an unstable world, bringing subaltern populations into the harsh glare of permanent technological visibility, and attacks by urban elites, courts and visceral media industries. The book examines contemporary Delhi from some of these sites: the unmaking of the citys modernist planning design, new technological urban networks that bypass states and corporations, and the tragic experience of the road accident terrifyingly enhanced by technological culture. Pirate Modernity moves between past and present, along with debates in Asia, Africa and Latin America on urbanism, media culture, and everyday life. This pioneering book suggests cities have to be revisited afresh after proliferating media culture. Pirate Modernity boldly draws from urban and cultural theory to open a new agenda for a world after media urbanism.