Citizen 13660

Citizen 13660
Author: Anonim
Pages: 209
ISBN: 0295993928
Available:
Release: 2014
Editor: Classics of Asian American Lit
Language: un

Explanation of the Book:

Mine Okubo was one of over one hundred thousand people of Japanese descent--nearly two-thirds of whom were American citizens--who were forced into "protective custody" shortly after Pearl Harbor. Citizen 13660, Okubo's graphic memoir of life in relocation centers in California and Utah, illuminates this experience with poignant illustrations and witty, candid text. Now available with a new introduction by Christine Hong and in a wide-format artist edition, this graphic novel can reach a new generation of readers and scholars. "[Mine Okubo] took her months of life in the concentration camp and made it the material for this amusing, heart-breaking book. . . . The moral is never expressed, but the wry pictures and the scanty words make the reader laugh--and if he is an American too--blush." "A remarkably objective and vivid and even humorous account. . . . In dramatic and detailed drawings and brief text, she documents the whole episode . . . all that she saw, objectively, yet with a warmth of understanding." -New York Times Book Review

Citizen 13660

Citizen 13660
Author: Anonim
Pages: 209
ISBN: 0295959894
Available:
Release: 1983
Editor: University of Washington Press
Language: un

Explanation of the Book:

Drawings with brief comments by the author describe her memories of life in a California internment camp during World War II

Mine Okubo

Mine Okubo
Author: Greg Robinson,Elena Tajima Creef
Pages: 224
ISBN: 9780295997629
Available:
Release: 2017-05-01
Editor: University of Washington Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

�To me life and art are one and the same, for the key lies in one's knowledge of people and life. In art one is trying to express it in the simplest imaginative way, as in the art of past civilizations, for beauty and truth are the only two things which live timeless and ageless.� - Min� Okubo This is the first book-length critical examination of the life and work of Min� Okubo (1912-2001), a pioneering Nisei artist, writer, and social activist who repeatedly defied conventional role expectations for women and for Japanese Americans over her seventy-year career. Okubo's landmark Citizen 13660 (first published in 1946) is the first and arguably best-known autobiographical narrative of the wartime Japanese American relocation and confinement experience. Born in Riverside, California, Okubo was incarcerated by the U.S. government during World War II, first at the Tanforan Assembly Center in California and later at the Topaz War Relocation Center in Utah. There she taught art and directed the production of a literary and art magazine. While in camp, Okubo documented her confinement experience by making hundreds of paintings and pen-and-ink sketches. These provided the material for Citizen 13660. Word of her talent spread to Fortune magazine, which hired her as an illustrator. Under the magazine's auspices, she was able to leave the camp and relocate to New York City, where she pursued her art over the next half century. This lovely and inviting book, lavishly illustrated with both color and halftone images, many of which have never before been reproduced, introduces readers to Okubo's oeuvre through a selection of her paintings, drawings, illustrations, and writings from different periods of her life. In addition, it contains tributes and essays on Okubo's career and legacy by specialists in the fields of art history, education, women's studies, literature, American political history, and ethnic studies, essays that illuminate the importance of her contributions to American arts and letters. Min� Okubo expands the sparse critical literature on Asian American women, as well as that on the Asian American experience in the eastern United States. It also serves as an excellent companion to Citizen 13660, providing critical tools and background to place Okubo's work in its historical and literary contexts.

Citizen 13660 Drawings Text by Min Okubo

Citizen 13660  Drawings   Text by Min   Okubo
Author: Miné Okubo
Pages: 209
ISBN: OCLC:563818343
Available:
Release: 1946
Editor: Unknown
Language: un

Explanation of the Book:

Study Guide

Study Guide
Author: Supersummary
Pages: 38
ISBN: 1708739696
Available:
Release: 2019-11-15
Editor: Unknown
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

SuperSummary, a modern alternative to SparkNotes and CliffsNotes, offers high-quality study guides for challenging works of literature. This 37-page guide for "Citizen 13660" by Mine Okubo includes detailed chapter summaries and analysis, as well as several more in-depth sections of expert-written literary analysis. Featured content includes commentary on major characters, 25 important quotes, essay topics, and key themes like The Wartime Erosion of Individual Identity, Family, and Social Life and The Connection Between US Racial Dynamics and Policy.

Citizen 13660

Citizen 13660
Author: Anonim
Pages: 209
ISBN: OCLC:924370527
Available:
Release: 1983
Editor: Unknown
Language: un

Explanation of the Book:

Personal Justice Denied

Personal Justice Denied
Author: United States. Commission on Wartime Relocation and Internment of Civilians
Pages: 467
ISBN: MSU:31293007086683
Available:
Release: 1983
Editor: Unknown
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

They Called Us Enemy Expanded Edition

They Called Us Enemy   Expanded Edition
Author: George Takei,Justin Eisinger,Steven Scott
Pages: 329
ISBN: 9781684068821
Available:
Release: 2020-08-26
Editor: Top Shelf Productions
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

The New York Times bestselling graphic memoir from actor/author/activist George Takei returns in a deluxe edition with 16 pages of bonus material! Experience the forces that shaped an American icon -- and America itself -- in this gripping tale of courage, country, loyalty, and love. George Takei has captured hearts and minds worldwide with his magnetic performances, sharp wit, and outspoken commitment to equal rights. But long before he braved new frontiers in STAR TREK, he woke up as a four-year-old boy to find his own birth country at war with his father's -- and their entire family forced from their home into an uncertain future. In 1942, at the order of President Franklin D. Roosevelt, every person of Japanese descent on the west coast was rounded up and shipped to one of ten "relocation centers," hundreds or thousands of miles from home, where they would be held for years under armed guard. THEY CALLED US ENEMY is Takei's firsthand account of those years behind barbed wire, the terrors and small joys of childhood in the shadow of legalized racism, his mother's hard choices, his father's tested faith in democracy, and the way those experiences planted the seeds for his astonishing future. What does it mean to be American? Who gets to decide? George Takei joins cowriters Justin Eisinger & Steven Scott and artist Harmony Becker for the journey of a lifetime.

Enemies

Enemies
Author: Anonim
Pages: 197
ISBN: 0803228066
Available:
Release: 2009-10-01
Editor: U of Nebraska Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

They were called aliens and enemies. But the World War II internees John Christgau writes about were in fact ordinary people victimized by the politics of a global war. The Alien Enemy Control Program in America was born with the United States?s declaration of war on Japan, Germany, and Italy and lasted until 1948. In all, 31,275 ?enemy aliens? were imprisoned in camps like the one described in this book?Fort Lincoln, just south of Bismarck, North Dakota. ø In animated and suspenseful prose, Christgau tells the stories of several individuals whose experiences are representative of those at Fort Lincoln. The subjects? lives before and after capture?presented in five case studies?tell of encroaching bitterness and sorrow. Christgau based his accounts on voluminous and previously untouched National Archives and FBI documents in addition to letters, diaries, and interviews with his subjects. ø Christgau?s afterword for this Bison Books edition relates additional stories of World War II alien restriction, detention, and internment that surfaced after this book was originally published, and he draws parallels between the alien internment of World War II and events in this country since September 11, 2001.

Occupying Space in American Literature and Culture

Occupying Space in American Literature and Culture
Author: Ana M. Manzanas,Jesús Benito Sanchez
Pages: 170
ISBN: 9781317917953
Available:
Release: 2014-04-24
Editor: Routledge
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Occupying Space in American Literature and Culture inscribes itself within the spatial turn that permeates the ways we look at literary and cultural productions. The volume seeks to clarify the connections between race, space, class, and identity as it concentrates on different occupations and disoccupations, enclosures and boundaries. Space is scaled up and down, from the body, the ground zero of spatiality, to the texturology of Manhattan; from the striated place of the office in Melville’s "Bartleby, the Scrivener" on Wall Street, to the striated spaces of internment camps and reservations; from the lowest of the low, the (human) clutter that lined the streets of Albany, NY, during the Depression, to the new Towers of Babel that punctuate the contemporary architecture of transparencies. As it strings together these spatial narratives, the volume reveals how, beyond the boundaries that characterize each space, every location has loose ends that are impossible to contain.

Developing Textbook Fluency

Developing Textbook Fluency
Author: Sherrie Nist-Olejnik,Michele L. Simpson
Pages: 462
ISBN: PSU:000033198262
Available:
Release: 1996
Editor: Houghton Mifflin
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

I Call to Remembrance

I Call to Remembrance
Author: Toyo Suyemoto
Pages: 224
ISBN: 9780813541549
Available:
Release: 2007-07-13
Editor: Rutgers University Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Toyo Suyemoto is known informally by literary scholars and the media as "Japanese America's poet laureate." But Suyemoto has always described herself in much more humble terms. A first-generation Japanese American, she has identified herself as a storyteller, a teacher, a mother whose only child died from illness, and an internment camp survivor. Before Suyemoto passed away in 2003, she wrote a moving and illuminating memoir of her internment camp experiences with her family and infant son at Tanforan Race Track and, later, at the Topaz Relocation Center in Utah, from 1942 to 1945. A uniquely poetic contribution to the small body of internment memoirs, Suyemoto's account includes information about policies and wartime decisions that are not widely known, and recounts in detail the way in which internees adjusted their notions of selfhood and citizenship, lending insight to the complicated and controversial questions of citizenship, accountability, and resistance of first- and second-generation Japanese Americans. Suyemoto's poems, many written during internment, are interwoven throughout the text and serve as counterpoints to the contextualizing narrative. Suyemoto's poems, many written during internment, are interwoven throughout the text and serve as counterpoints to the contextualizing narrative. A small collection of poems written in the years following her incarceration further reveal the psychological effects of her experience.

After Camp

After Camp
Author: Greg Robinson
Pages: 318
ISBN: 9780520271586
Available:
Release: 2012
Editor: Univ of California Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

"The tragedy of incarceration has dominated historical studies of Japanese Americans, and few have explored what happened in the years that followed. A welcome addition to the literature, Greg Robinson's insightful study, "After Camp," will appeal to historians of immigration, the Asian American experience, comparative race relations, and the twentieth-century United States more broadly." --David K. Yoo, author of "Growing Up Nisei" "Greg Robinson has boldly and rightfully identified historians' neglect of Japanese American experiences after World War II. Rather than focusing exclusively on the Pacific Coast, "After Camp" offers a nuanced exploration of the competing strategies and ideas about postwar assimilation among ethnic Japanese on a truly national scale. The depth and range of Robinson's research is impressive, and "After Camp" convincingly moves beyond the tragedy of internment to explain how the drama of resettlement was equally if not more important in shaping the lives of contemporary Japanese Americans."--Allison Varzally, author of "Making a Non-White America."

Less is More

Less is More
Author: Dawn Matus
Pages: 44
ISBN: OCLC:957326871
Available:
Release: 1987
Editor: Unknown
Language: un

Explanation of the Book:

Comics and Narration

Comics and Narration
Author: Thierry Groensteen
Pages: 216
ISBN: 9781628467963
Available:
Release: 2013-02-18
Editor: Univ. Press of Mississippi
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

This book is the follow-up to Thierry Groensteen's groundbreaking The System of Comics, in which the leading French-language comics theorist set out to investigate how the medium functions, introducing the principle of iconic solidarity, and showing the systems that underlie the articulation between panels at three levels: page layout, linear sequence, and nonsequential links woven through the comic book as a whole. He now develops that analysis further, using examples from a very wide range of comics, including the work of American artists such as Chris Ware and Robert Crumb. He tests out his theoretical framework by bringing it up against cases that challenge it, such as abstract comics, digital comics and shojo manga, and offers insightful reflections on these innovations. In addition, he includes lengthy chapters on three areas not covered in the first book. First, he explores the role of the narrator, both verbal and visual, and the particular issues that arise out of narration in autobiographical comics. Second, Groensteen tackles the question of rhythm in comics, and the skill demonstrated by virtuoso artists in intertwining different rhythms over and above the basic beat provided by the discontinuity of the panels. And third he resets the relationship of comics to contemporary art, conditioned by cultural history and aesthetic traditions but evolving recently as comics artists move onto avant-garde terrain.

The Deoliwallahs

The Deoliwallahs
Author: Joy Ma,Dilip D'Souza
Pages: 329
ISBN: 9781529048865
Available:
Release: 2020-01-23
Editor: Pan Macmillan
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

'Humanly compelling, beautifully told ... brings to light a forgotten chapter of Indian history, one we need to remember in these troubled times' PRATAP BHANU MEHTA '[Joy Ma and Dilip D'Souza] have seamlessly woven together historical facts with personal stories about how the Chinese- Indians lost the country of their birth' YIN MARSH The untold account of the internment of 3,000 Chinese-Indians after the 1962 Sino-Indian War. Just after the Sino-Indian War of 1962, about 3,000 Chinese-Indians were sent to languish in a disused World War II POW camp in Deoli, Rajasthan, marking the beginning of a painful five-year-long internment without resolution. At a time of war with China, these ‘Chinese-looking’ people had fallen prey to government suspicion and paranoia which soon seeped into the public consciousness. This is a page of Indian history that comes wrapped in prejudice and fear, and is today largely forgotten. But over five decades on, survivors of the internment are finally starting to tell their stories. As several Indian communities are once again faced with discrimination, The Deoliwallahs records these untold stories through extensive interviews with seven survivors of the Deoli internment. Through these accounts, the book recovers a crucial chapter in our history, also documenting for the first time how the Chinese came to be in India, how they made this country their home and became a significant community, until the war of 1962 brought on a terrible incarceration, displacement and tragedy.

Race Relations

Race Relations
Author: Anonim
Pages: 329
ISBN: UIUC:30112002756705
Available:
Release: 1945
Editor: Unknown
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

China Men

China Men
Author: Maxine Hong Kingston
Pages: 308
ISBN: 9780679723288
Available:
Release: 1989
Editor: Vintage
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

The author chronicles the lives of three generations of Chinese men in America, woven from memory, myth and fact. Here's a storyteller's tale of what they endured in a strange new land.

Re orientation

Re orientation
Author: Elena Tajima Creef
Pages: 390
ISBN: UCSC:32106010051503
Available:
Release: 1994
Editor: Unknown
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

The Life of Paper

The Life of Paper
Author: Sharon Luk
Pages: 292
ISBN: 9780520296237
Available:
Release: 2017-11-21
Editor: Univ of California Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

The Life of Paper offers a wholly original and inspiring analysis of how people facing systematic social dismantling have engaged letter correspondence to remake themselves—from bodily integrity to subjectivity and collective and spiritual being. Exploring the evolution of racism and confinement in California history, this ambitious investigation disrupts common understandings of the early detention of Chinese migrants (1880s–1920s), the internment of Japanese Americans (1930s–1940s), and the mass incarceration of African Americans (1960s–present) in its meditation on modern development and imprisonment as a way of life. Situating letters within global capitalist movements, racial logics, and overlapping modes of social control, Sharon Luk demonstrates how correspondence becomes a poetic act of reinvention and a way to live for those who are incarcerated.