Ar n t I a Woman

Ar n t I a Woman
Author: Deborah Gray White
Pages: 216
ISBN: 039330406X
Available:
Release: 1985
Editor: W. W. Norton
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Exploration of the assumed roles within families and the community and the burdens placed on slave women.

Ar n t I A Woman

Ar n t I A Woman
Author: Deborah Gray White
Pages: 329
ISBN: OCLC:650283773
Available:
Release: 1985
Editor: Unknown
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Ar n t I a Woman

Ar n t I a Woman
Author: Deborah Gray White
Pages: 244
ISBN: 0393314812
Available:
Release: 1999
Editor: W. W. Norton & Company
Language: un

Explanation of the Book:

Explores the contributions made by enslaved women to the family's economy and suggests they achieved a greater degree of equality with their men than white women

Ar n t I a Woman Female Slaves in the Plantation South Revised Edition

Ar n t I a Woman   Female Slaves in the Plantation South  Revised Edition
Author: Deborah Gray White
Pages: 256
ISBN: 9780393343526
Available:
Release: 1999-02-17
Editor: W. W. Norton & Company
Language: un

Explanation of the Book:

"This is one of those rare books that quickly became the standard work in its field. Professor White has done justice to the complexity of her subject."—Anne Firor Scott, Duke University Living with the dual burdens of racism and sexism, slave women in the plantation South assumed roles within the family and community that contrasted sharply with traditional female roles in the larger American society. This new edition of Ar'n't I a Woman? reviews and updates the scholarship on slave women and the slave family, exploring new ways of understanding the intersection of race and gender and comparing the myths that stereotyped female slaves with the realities of their lives. Above all, this groundbreaking study shows us how black women experienced freedom in the Reconstruction South — their heroic struggle to gain their rights, hold their families together, resist economic and sexual oppression, and maintain their sense of womanhood against all odds.

Ain t I A Woman

Ain t I A Woman
Author: Sojourner Truth
Pages: 112
ISBN: 9780241472378
Available:
Release: 2020-09-24
Editor: Penguin UK
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

'I am a woman's rights. I have plowed and reaped and husked and chopped and mowed, and can any man do more than that? I am as strong as any man that is now' A former slave and one of the most powerful orators of her time, Sojourner Truth fought for the equal rights of black women throughout her life. This selection of her impassioned speeches is accompanied by the words of other inspiring African-American female campaigners from the nineteenth century. One of twenty new books in the bestselling Penguin Great Ideas series. This new selection showcases a diverse list of thinkers who have helped shape our world today, from anarchists to stoics, feminists to prophets, satirists to Zen Buddhists.

Ain t I a Woman

Ain t I a Woman
Author: bell hooks
Pages: 206
ISBN: 9781317588610
Available:
Release: 2014-12-17
Editor: Routledge
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

A classic work of feminist scholarship, Ain't I a Woman has become a must-read for all those interested in the nature of black womanhood. Examining the impact of sexism on black women during slavery, the devaluation of black womanhood, black male sexism, racism among feminists, and the black woman's involvement with feminism, hooks attempts to move us beyond racist and sexist assumptions. The result is nothing short of groundbreaking, giving this book a critical place on every feminist scholar's bookshelf.

Sojourner Truth A Life A Symbol

Sojourner Truth  A Life  A Symbol
Author: Nell Irvin Painter
Pages: 384
ISBN: 9780393635669
Available:
Release: 1997-10-17
Editor: W. W. Norton & Company
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

A monumental biography of one of the most important black women of the nineteenth century. Sojourner Truth first gained prominence at an 1851 Akron, Ohio, women's rights conference, saying, "Dat man over dar say dat woman needs to be helped into carriages, and lifted over ditches. . . . Nobody eber helps me into carriages, or ober mud-puddles . . . and ar'n't I a woman?" Sojourner Truth: ex-slave and fiery abolitionist, figure of imposing physique, riveting preacher and spellbinding singer who dazzled listeners with her wit and originality. Straight-talking and unsentimental, Truth became a national symbol for strong black women--indeed, for all strong women. Like Harriet Tubman and Frederick Douglass, she is regarded as a radical of immense and enduring influence; yet, unlike them, what is remembered of her consists more of myth than of personality. Now, in a masterful blend of scholarship and sympathetic understanding, eminent black historian Nell Irvin Painter goes beyond the myths, words, and photographs to uncover the life of a complex woman who was born into slavery and died a legend. Inspired by religion, Truth transformed herself from a domestic servant named Isabella into an itinerant pentecostal preacher; her words of empowerment have inspired black women and poor people the world over to this day. As an abolitionist and a feminist, Truth defied the notion that slaves were male and women were white, expounding a fact that still bears repeating: among blacks there are women; among women, there are blacks. No one who heard her speak ever forgot Sojourner Truth, the power and pathos of her voice, and the intelligence of her message. No one who reads Painter's groundbreaking biography will forget this landmark figure and the story of her courageous life.

The Plantation Mistress

The Plantation Mistress
Author: Catherine Clinton
Pages: 331
ISBN: 9780394722535
Available:
Release: 1982
Editor: Pantheon
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Examines the place of women in the daily life of the Southern plantations before the Civil War and analyzes the women's relationship with slaves and their masters

Too Heavy a Load

Too Heavy a Load
Author: Deborah Gray White
Pages: 320
ISBN: 0393046672
Available:
Release: 1999
Editor: W W Norton & Company Incorporated
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Chronicles one hundred years in the struggle of African-American women to attain equality and to establish a resistance to persistent racism, male chauvinism, and negative sterotyping, assessing black women's role in the battle for civil rights and women's rights.

Telling Histories

Telling Histories
Author: Deborah Gray White
Pages: 560
ISBN: 9781458722911
Available:
Release: 2009-09-17
Editor: ReadHowYouWant.com
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

The field of black women's history gained recognition as a legitimate field of study late in the twentieth century. Collecting stories that are both deeply personal and powerfully political, Telling Histories compiles seventeen personal narratives by leading black women historians at various stages in their careers, illuminating how they entered and navigated higher education, a world concerned with - and dominated by - whites and men. In distinct voices and from different vantage points, the personal histories revealed here also tell the story of the struggle to establish the fields of African American and African American women's history.

Women in Chains

Women in Chains
Author: Venetria K. Patton
Pages: 204
ISBN: 9781438415611
Available:
Release: 1999-11-01
Editor: SUNY Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

CHOICE 2000 Outstanding Academic Book Traces the connection between slavery and the way in which black women fiction writers depict female characters and address gender issues, particularly maternity. Using writers such as Harriet Wilson, Frances E. W. Harper, Pauline Hopkins, Toni Morrison, Sherley Anne Williams, and Gayl Jones, the author highlights recurring themes and the various responses of black women writers to the issues of race and gender. Time and again these writers link slavery with motherhood--their depictions of black womanhood are tied to the effects of slavery and represented through the black mother. Patton shows that both the image others have of black women as well as black women's own self image is framed and influenced by the history of slavery. This history would have us believe that female slaves were mere breeders and not mothers. However, Patton uses the mother figure as a tool to create an intriguing interdisciplinary literary analysis. "Women in Chains establishes the liberational context of black women's fiction through close and careful readings of archetypal text and through the application of sophisticated literary analysis grounded in the living legacy of our own 'talking books.' In this book, Patton walks a weary mile in the shoes of her chosen foremothers and finds her own place in the tradition." -- Joanne M. Braxton, The College of William and Mary

Scarlet and Black

Scarlet and Black
Author: Marisa J. Fuentes,Deborah Gray White
Pages: 222
ISBN: 9780813592121
Available:
Release: 2016-12-20
Editor: Rutgers University Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

The 250th anniversary of the founding of Rutgers University is a perfect moment for the Rutgers community to reconcile its past, and acknowledge its role in the enslavement and debasement of African Americans and the disfranchisement and elimination of Native American people and culture. Scarlet and Black documents the history of Rutgers’s connection to slavery, which was neither casual nor accidental—nor unusual. Like most early American colleges, Rutgers depended on slaves to build its campuses and serve its students and faculty; it depended on the sale of black people to fund its very existence. Men like John Henry Livingston, (Rutgers president from 1810–1824), the Reverend Philip Milledoler, (president of Rutgers from 1824–1840), Henry Rutgers, (trustee after whom the college is named), and Theodore Frelinghuysen, (Rutgers’s seventh president), were among the most ardent anti-abolitionists in the mid-Atlantic. Scarlet and black are the colors Rutgers University uses to represent itself to the nation and world. They are the colors the athletes compete in, the graduates and administrators wear on celebratory occasions, and the colors that distinguish Rutgers from every other university in the United States. This book, however, uses these colors to signify something else: the blood that was spilled on the banks of the Raritan River by those dispossessed of their land and the bodies that labored unpaid and in bondage so that Rutgers could be built and sustained. The contributors to this volume offer this history as a usable one—not to tear down or weaken this very renowned, robust, and growing institution—but to strengthen it and help direct its course for the future. The work of the Committee on Enslaved and Disenfranchised Population in Rutgers History. Visit the project's website at http://scarletandblack.rutgers.edu

Women and Slavery in America

Women and Slavery in America
Author: Catherine M. Lewis,J. Richard Lewis
Pages: 318
ISBN: 9781557289582
Available:
Release: 2011-03-01
Editor: University of Arkansas Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Women and Slavery offers readers an opportunity to examine the establishment, growth, and evolution of slavery in the United States as it impacted women-enslaved and free, African American and white, wealthy and poor, northern and southern. The primary documents-including newspaper articles, broadsides, cartoons, pamphlets, speeches, photographs, memoirs, and editorials-are organized thematically and represent cultural, political, religious, economic, and social perspectives on this dark and complex period in American history.

More Than Chattel

More Than Chattel
Author: David Barry Gaspar,Darlene Clark Hine
Pages: 360
ISBN: 9780253013651
Available:
Release: 1996-04-22
Editor: Indiana University Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

". . . a much-needed volume on a neglected topic that is of great interest to scholars of women, slavery, and African American history." —Drew Faust Gender was a decisive force in shaping slave society. Slave men's experiences differed from those of slave women, who were exploited both in reproductive as well as productive capacities. The women did not figure prominently in revolts, because they engaged in less confrontational resistance, emphasizing creative struggle to survive dehumanization and abuse. The contributors are Hilary Beckles, Barbara Bush, Cheryl Ann Cody, David Barry Gaspar, David P. Geggus, Virginia Meacham Gould, Mary Karasch, Wilma King, Bernard Moitt, Celia E. Naylor-Ojurongbe, Robert A. Olwell, Claire Robertson, Robert W. Slenes, Susan M. Socolow, Richard H. Steckel, and Brenda E. Stevenson.

Within the Plantation Household

Within the Plantation Household
Author: Elizabeth Fox-Genovese
Pages: 563
ISBN: 9780807864227
Available:
Release: 2000-11-09
Editor: UNC Press Books
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Documenting the difficult class relations between women slaveholders and slave women, this study shows how class and race as well as gender shaped women's experiences and determined their identities. Drawing upon massive research in diaries, letters, memoirs, and oral histories, the author argues that the lives of antebellum southern women, enslaved and free, differed fundamentally from those of northern women and that it is not possible to understand antebellum southern women by applying models derived from New England sources.

Courtship and Love Among the Enslaved in North Carolina

Courtship and Love Among the Enslaved in North Carolina
Author: Rebecca J. Fraser
Pages: 148
ISBN: 1604733128
Available:
Release: 2007
Editor: Univ. Press of Mississippi
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Through an examination of various couples who were forced to live in slavery, Rebecca J. Fraser argues that slaves found ways to conduct successful courting relationships. In its focus on the processes of courtship among the enslaved, this study offers further insight into the meanings that structured intimate lives. Establishing their courtships, often across plantations, the enslaved men and women of antebellum North Carolina worked within and around the slave system to create and maintain meaningful personal relationships that were both of and apart from the world of the plantation. They claimed the right to participate in the social events of courtship and, in the process, challenged and disrupted the southern social order in discreet and covert acts of defiance. Informed by feminist conceptions of gender, sexuality, power, and resistance, the study argues that the courting relationship afforded the enslaved a significant social space through which they could cultivate alternative identities to those which were imposed upon them in the context of their daily working lives. Rebecca J. Fraser is lecturer in American studies at the University of East Anglia. Her essays have appeared in Journal of Southern History and Slavery and Abolition.

What a Woman Ought to Be and to Do

What a Woman Ought to Be and to Do
Author: Stephanie J. Shaw
Pages: 364
ISBN: 9780226751306
Available:
Release: 2010-01-15
Editor: University of Chicago Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Stephanie J. Shaw takes us into the inner world of American black professional women during the Jim Crow era. This is a story of struggle and empowerment, of the strength of a group of women who worked against daunting odds to improve the world for themselves and their people. Shaw's remarkable research into the lives of social workers, librarians, nurses, and teachers from the 1870s through the 1950s allows us to hear these women's voices for the first time. The women tell us, in their own words, about their families, their values, their expectations. We learn of the forces and factors that made them exceptional, and of the choices and commitments that made them leaders in their communities. What a Woman Ought to Be and to Do brings to life a world in which African-American families, communities, and schools worked to encourage the self-confidence, individual initiative, and social responsibility of girls. Shaw shows us how, in a society that denied black women full professional status, these girls embraced and in turn defined an ideal of "socially responsible individualism" that balanced private and public sphere responsibilities. A collective portrait of character shaped in the toughest circumstances, this book is more than a study of the socialization of these women as children and the organization of their work as adults. It is also a study of leadership—of how African American communities gave their daughters the power to succeed in and change a hostile world.

Sojourner Truth

Sojourner Truth
Author: Carleton Mabee,Susan Mabee Newhouse
Pages: 312
ISBN: 9780814755259
Available:
Release: 1995-03
Editor: NYU Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Many Americans have long since forgotten that there ever was slavery along the Hudson River. Yet Sojourner Truth was born a slave near the Hudson River in Ulster County, New York, in the late 1700s. Called merely Isabella as a slave, once freed she adopted the name of Sojourner Truth and became a national figure in the struggle for the emancipation of both blacks and women in Civil War America. Despite the discrimination she suffered as both a black and a woman, Truth significantly shaped both her own life and the struggle for human rights in America. Through her fierce intelligence, her resourcefulness, and her eloquence, she became widely acknowledged as a remarkable figure during her life, and she has become one of the most heavily mythologized figures in American history. While some of the myths about Truth have served positive functions, they have also contributed to distortions about American history, specifically about the history of blacks and women. In this landmark work, the product of years of primary research, Pulizter-Prize winning biographer Carleton Mabee has unearthed the best available sources about this remarkable woman to reconstruct her life as directly as the most original and reliable available sources permit. Included here are new insights on why she never learned to read, on the authenticity of the famous quotations attributed to her (such as Ar'n't I a woman?), her relationship to President Lincoln, her role in the abolitionist movement, her crusade to move freed slaves from the South to the North, and her life as a singer, orator, feminist and woman of faith. This is an engaging, historically precise biography that reassesses the place of Sojourner Truth—slave, prophet, legend--in American history. Sojourner Truth is one of the most famous and most mythologized figures in American history. Pulitzer-Prize-winning biographer Carleton Mabee unearths heretofore-neglected sources and offers valuable new insights into the life of a woman who, against all odds, became a central figure in the struggle for the emancipation of slaves and women in Civil War America.

Sojourner Truth

Sojourner Truth
Author: Isabelle Kinnard Richman
Pages: 180
ISBN: 9781136175152
Available:
Release: 2016-04-28
Editor: Routledge
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Although Sojourner Truth was born into bondage and oppression, in liberation she emerged as a leader in the most radical causes of her era. She travelled the country as an outspoken and riveting presence, battling for the abolition of slavery and for women’s suffrage. While her role in these movements has been well-documented, biographers have frequently overlooked the influence of religion in Truth’s life. A participant in a number of the most significant religious movements of her day, including the Methodist Perfectionists, the Kingdom of Matthias, the Utopians, and the Spiritualists, Truth drew her notions of justice from religion. Sojourner Truth: Prophet of Social Justice provides a concise biography of this important figure, integrating her religious life in ways that shed light on Truth’s work and the religious movements of her day. Accompanied by primary source documents including political records, speech transcripts, and selections from her autobiography, Richman's biography provides a rich and accessible narrative of Truth's life and legacy.

Woman of Color Daughter of Privilege

Woman of Color  Daughter of Privilege
Author: Kent Anderson Leslie
Pages: 248
ISBN: 9780820337173
Available:
Release: 2010-04-15
Editor: University of Georgia Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

This fascinating story of Amanda America Dickson, born the privileged daughter of a white planter and an unconsenting slave in antebellum Georgia, shows how strong-willed individuals defied racial strictures for the sake of family. Kent Anderson Leslie uses the events of Dickson's life to explore the forces driving southern race and gender relations from the days of King Cotton through the Civil War, Reconstruction, and New South eras. Although legally a slave herself well into her adolescence, Dickson was much favored by her father and lived comfortably in his house, receiving a genteel upbringing and education. After her father died in 1885 Dickson inherited most of his half-million dollar estate, sparking off two years of legal battles with white relatives. When the Georgia Supreme Court upheld the will, Dickson became the largest landowner in Hancock County, Georgia, and the wealthiest black woman in the post-Civil War South. Kent Anderson Leslie's portrayal of Dickson is enhanced by a wealth of details about plantation life; the elaborate codes of behavior for men and women, blacks and whites in the South; and the equally complicated circumstances under which racial transgressions were sometimes ignored, tolerated, or even accepted.