A Desolate Place for a Defiant People

A Desolate Place for a Defiant People
Author: Daniel O. Sayers
Pages: 288
ISBN: 081306192X
Available:
Release: 2016
Editor: Unknown
Language: un

Explanation of the Book:

Sayers examines the Great Dismal Swamp's archaeological record from ca. 1600 until the time of the Civil War, exposing and unraveling the complex social and economic systems developed by the thousands of Indigenous Americans, Africa American maroons, free African Americans, enslaved company workers, and outcast Europeans who made the Swamp their home.

Slavery s Exiles

Slavery s Exiles
Author: Sylviane A. Diouf
Pages: 403
ISBN: 9780814760284
Available:
Release: 2016-03-01
Editor: NYU Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Over more than two centuries men, women, and children escaped from slavery to make the Southern wilderness their home. They hid in the mountains of Virginia and the low swamps of South Carolina; they stayed in the neighborhood or paddled their way to secluded places; they buried themselves underground or built comfortable settlements. Known as maroons, they lived on their own or set up communities in swamps or other areas where they were not likely to be discovered. Although well-known, feared, celebrated or demonized at the time, the maroons whose stories are the subject of this book have been forgotten, overlooked by academic research that has focused on the Caribbean and Latin America. Who the American maroons were, what led them to choose this way of life over alternatives, what forms of marronage they created, what their individual and collective lives were like, how they organized themselves to survive, and how their particular story fits into the larger narrative of slave resistance are questions that this book seeks to answer. To survive, the American maroons reinvented themselves, defied slave society, enforced their own definition of freedom and dared create their own alternative to what the country had delineated as being black men and women’s proper place. Audacious, self-confident, autonomous, sometimes self-sufficient, always self-governing; their very existence was a repudiation of the basic tenets of slavery.

City of Refuge

City of Refuge
Author: Marcus P. Nevius
Pages: 168
ISBN: 9780820356426
Available:
Release: 2020
Editor: University of Georgia Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

City of Refuge is a story of petit marronage, an informal slave's economy, and the construction of internal improvements in the Great Dismal Swamp of Virginia and North Carolina. The vast wetland was tough terrain that most white Virginians and North Carolinians considered uninhabitable. Perceived desolation notwithstanding, black slaves fled into the swamp's remote sectors and engaged in petit marronage, a type of escape and fugitivity prevalent throughout the Atlantic world. An alternative to the dangers of flight by way of the Underground Railroad, maroon communities often neighbored slave-labor camps, the latter located on the swamp's periphery and operated by the Dismal Swamp Land Company and other companies that employed slave labor to facilitate the extraction of the Dismal's natural resources. Often with the tacit acceptance of white company agents, company slaves engaged in various exchanges of goods and provisions with maroons--networks that padded company accounts even as they helped to sustain maroon colonies and communities. In his examination of life, commerce, and social activity in the Great Dismal Swamp, Marcus P. Nevius engages the historiographies of slave resistance and abolitionism in the early American republic. City of Refuge uses a wide variety of primary sources--including runaway advertisements; planters' and merchants' records, inventories, letterbooks, and correspondence; abolitionist pamphlets and broadsides; county free black registries; and the records and inventories of private companies--to examine how American maroons, enslaved canal laborers, white company agents, and commission merchants shaped, and were shaped by, race and slavery in an important region in the history of the late Atlantic world.

Karl Marx Anthropologist

Karl Marx  Anthropologist
Author: Thomas C. Patterson
Pages: 240
ISBN: 9781847885425
Available:
Release: 2009-04-01
Editor: Berg
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

After being widely rejected in the late 20th century the work of Karl Marx is now being reassessed by many theorists and activists. Karl Marx, Anthropologist explores how this most influential of modern thinkers is still highly relevant for Anthropology today. Marx was profoundly influenced by critical Enlightenment thought. He believed that humans were social individuals that simultaneously satisfied and forged their needs in the contexts of historically particular social relations and created cultures. Marx continually refined the empirical, philosophical, and practical dimensions of his anthropology throughout his lifetime. Assessing key concepts, from the differences between class-based and classless societies to the roles of exploitation, alienation and domination in the making of social individuals, Karl Marx, Anthropologist is an essential guide to Marx's anthropological thought for the 21st century.

Maroons and the Marooned

Maroons and the Marooned
Author: Richard Bodek,Joseph Kelly
Pages: 224
ISBN: 9781496827234
Available:
Release: 2020-05-15
Editor: Univ. Press of Mississippi
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Contributions by Richard Bodek, Claire P. Curtis, Joseph Kelly, Simon Lewis, Steve Mentz, J. Brent Morris, Peter Sands, Edward Shore, and James O'Neil Spady Commonly, the word maroon refers to someone cast away on an island. One becomes marooned, usually, through a storm at sea or by a captain as a method of punishment. But the term originally denoted escaped slaves. Though being marooned came to be associated mostly with white European castaways, the etymology invites comparison between true maroons (escaped slaves establishing new lives in the wilderness) and people who were marooned (through maritime disaster). This volume brings together literary scholars with historians, encompassing both literal maroons such as in Brazil and South Carolina as well as metaphoric scenarios in time-travel novels and postapocalyptic narratives. Included are examples from The Tempest; Margaret Atwood’s MaddAddam trilogy; A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court; and Octavia Butler’s Kindred. Both runaways and castaways formed new societies in the wilderness. But true maroons, escaped slaves, were not cast away; they chose to fly towards the uncertainties of the wild in pursuit of freedom. In effect, this volume gives these maroons proper credit, at the very heart of American history.

Archaeologists as Activists

Archaeologists as Activists
Author: M. Jay Stottman
Pages: 207
ISBN: 9780817356224
Available:
Release: 2010
Editor: University of Alabama Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

A series of essays examines the ways in which archaeologists can and do use their research into the distant past to help solve the problems of today and beyond. Simultaneous.

Maroon Societies

Maroon Societies
Author: Richard X. Price
Pages: 329
ISBN: 0844650757
Available:
Release: 1983-07
Editor: Unknown
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

"Price breaks new ground in the study of slave resistance in his 'hemispheric' view of Maroon societies." -- Journal of Ethnic Studies

Black Feminist Archaeology

Black Feminist Archaeology
Author: Whitney Battle-Baptiste
Pages: 200
ISBN: 9781351573559
Available:
Release: 2017-07-05
Editor: Routledge
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Black feminist thought has developed in various parts of the academy for over three decades, but has made only minor inroads into archaeological theory and practice. Whitney Battle-Baptiste outlines the basic tenets of Black feminist thought and research for archaeologists and shows how it can be used to improve contemporary historical archaeology. She demonstrates this using Andrew Jackson‘s Hermitage, the W. E. B. Du Bois Homesite in Massachusetts, and the Lucy Foster house in Andover, which represented the first archaeological excavation of an African American home. Her call for an archaeology more sensitive to questions of race and gender is an important development for the field.

The Great Dismal

The Great Dismal
Author: Bland Simpson
Pages: 208
ISBN: 9780807867068
Available:
Release: 2000-11-09
Editor: Univ of North Carolina Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Just below the Tidewater area of Virginia, straddling the North Carolina-Virginia line, lies the Great Dismal Swamp, one of America's most mysterious wilderness areas. The swamp has long drawn adventurers, runaways, and romantics, and while many have tried to conquer it, none has succeeded. In this engaging memoir, Bland Simpson, who grew up near the swamp in North Carolina, blends personal experience, travel narrative, oral history, and natural history to create an intriguing portrait of the Great Dismal Swamp and its people. For this edition, he has added an epilogue discussing developments in the region since 1990.

The Fabulous History of the Dismal Swamp Company

The Fabulous History of the Dismal Swamp Company
Author: Charles Royster
Pages: 640
ISBN: 9780307773296
Available:
Release: 2010-12-08
Editor: Vintage
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

From historian Charles Royster--winner of the Francis Parkman, Bancroft, and Lincoln prizes--comes the history of one of eighteenth-century America's most fantastic land speculation deals: William Byrd's scheme to develop 900 square miles of swamp on the Virginia-North Carolina border and create fabulous wealth for himself and other shareholders, including George Washington. Royster scrupulously follows the paper trail through the byways of transatlantic deal-cutting, providing a rare view of early American economic culture. Elegantly written and impressively researched, The Fabulous History of the Dismal Swamp Company is an eye-opening account of greed, folly, and venture capitalism in the revolutionary era.

Glory Over Everything

Glory Over Everything
Author: Kathleen Grissom
Pages: 370
ISBN: 9781476748443
Available:
Release: 2017
Editor: Simon and Schuster
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Continues the story of Jamie Pyke, son of a slave and the master of Tall Oaks plantation, whose deadly secret compels him to take a treacherous journey through the Underground Railroad.

As If She Were Free

As If She Were Free
Author: Erica L. Ball,Tatiana Seijas,Terri L. Snyder
Pages: 320
ISBN: 9781108493406
Available:
Release: 2020-10-08
Editor: Cambridge University Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

A groundbreaking collective biography narrating the history of emancipation through the life stories of women of African descent in the Americas.

Narrative of the Life of Moses Grandy

Narrative of the Life of Moses Grandy
Author: Moses Grandy
Pages: 45
ISBN: UOM:69015000002697
Available:
Release: 1844
Editor: Unknown
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

This book is a slave narrative, written by former slave, Moses Grandy.

Let Our Fame Be Great

Let Our Fame Be Great
Author: Oliver Bullough
Pages: 512
ISBN: 9780141956220
Available:
Release: 2010-03-04
Editor: Penguin UK
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Two centuries ago, the Russians pushed out of the cold north towards the Caucasus Mountains, the range that blocked their access to Georgia, Turkey, Persia and India. They were forging their colonial destiny, and the mountains were in their way. The Caucasus had to be conquered and, for the highlanders who lived there, life would never be the same again. If the Russians expected it to be an easy fight, however, they were mistaken. Their armies would go on to defeat Napoleon and Hitler, as well as lesser foes, but no one resisted them for as long as these supposed savages. To hear the stories of the conquest, I travelled far from the mountains. I wandered through the steppes of Central Asia and the cities of Turkey. I squatted outside internment camps in Poland, and drank tea beneath the gentle hills of Israel. The stories I heard amplified the outrages I saw in the mountains themselves. As I set out, in my mind was a Chechen woman I had met in a refugee camp. She lived in a ragged, khaki tent in a field of mud and stones, but she welcomed me with laughter and kindness. Like the mountains of her homeland, her spirit had soared upwards, gleaming and pure. Throughout my travels, I met the same generosity from all the Caucasus peoples. Their stories have not been told, and there fame is not great, but truly it deserves to be.

Slave No More

Slave No More
Author: Aline Helg
Pages: 368
ISBN: 9781469649641
Available:
Release: 2019-02-07
Editor: UNC Press Books
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Commanding a vast historiography of slavery and emancipation, Aline Helg reveals as never before how significant numbers of enslaved Africans across the entire Western Hemisphere managed to free themselves hundreds of years before the formation of white-run abolitionist movements. Her sweeping view of resistance and struggle covers more than three centuries, from early colonization to the American and Haitian revolutions, Spanish American independence, and abolition in the British Caribbean. Helg not only underscores the agency of those who managed to become "free people of color" before abolitionism took hold but also assesses in detail the specific strategies they created and utilized. While recognizing the powerful forces supporting slavery, Helg articulates four primary liberation strategies: flight and marronage; manumission by legal document; military service, for men, in exchange for promised emancipation; and revolt—along with a willingness to exploit any weakness in the domination system. Helg looks at such actions at both individual and community levels and in the context of national and international political movements. Bringing together the broad currents of liberal abolitionism with an original analysis of forms of manumission and marronage, Slave No More deepens our understanding of how enslaved men, women, and even children contributed to the slow demise of slavery.

Nature Shock

Nature Shock
Author: Jon T. Coleman
Pages: 352
ISBN: 9780300255867
Available:
Release: 2020-08-12
Editor: Yale University Press
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

An award†‘winning environmental historian explores American history through wrenching, tragic, and sometimes humorous stories of getting lost The human species has a propensity for getting lost. The American people, inhabiting a mental landscape shaped by their attempts to plant roots and to break free, are no exception. In this engaging book, environmental historian Jon Coleman bypasses the trailblazers so often described in American history to follow instead the strays and drifters who went missing. From Hernando de Soto’s failed quest for riches in the American southeast to the recent trend of getting lost as a therapeutic escape from modernity, this book details a unique history of location and movement as well as the confrontations that occur when our physical and mental conceptions of space become disjointed. Whether we get lost in the woods, the plains, or the digital grid, Coleman argues that getting lost allows us to see wilderness anew and connect with generations across five centuries to discover a surprising and edgy American identity.

A Fine Balance

A Fine Balance
Author: Rohinton Mistry
Pages: 382
ISBN: 9781551991382
Available:
Release: 2010-10-29
Editor: McClelland & Stewart
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

A Fine Balance, Rohinton Mistry’s stunning internationally acclaimed bestseller, is set in mid-1970s India. It tells the story of four unlikely people whose lives come together during a time of political turmoil soon after the government declares a “State of Internal Emergency.” Through days of bleakness and hope, their circumstances – and their fates – become inextricably linked in ways no one could have foreseen. Mistry’s prose is alive with enduring images and a cast of unforgettable characters. Written with compassion, humour, and insight, A Fine Balance is a vivid, richly textured, and powerful novel written by one of the most gifted writers of our time.

Hidden Americans

Hidden Americans
Author: Hugo Prosper Leaming
Pages: 1358
ISBN: OCLC:320084940
Available:
Release: 1979
Editor: Unknown
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

Things Fall Apart

Things Fall Apart
Author: Chinua Achebe
Pages: 176
ISBN: 9780141393964
Available:
Release: 2013-04-25
Editor: Penguin UK
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

One of the BBC's '100 Novels That Shaped Our World' A worldwide bestseller and the first part of Achebe's African Trilogy, Things Fall Apart is the compelling story of one man's battle to protect his community against the forces of change Okonkwo is the greatest wrestler and warrior alive, and his fame spreads throughout West Africa like a bush-fire in the harmattan. But when he accidentally kills a clansman, things begin to fall apart. Then Okonkwo returns from exile to find missionaries and colonial governors have arrived in the village. With his world thrown radically off-balance he can only hurtle towards tragedy. First published in 1958, Chinua Achebe's stark, coolly ironic novel reshaped both African and world literature, and has sold over ten million copies in forty-five languages. This arresting parable of a proud but powerless man witnessing the ruin of his people begins Achebe's landmark trilogy of works chronicling the fate of one African community, continued in Arrow of God and No Longer at Ease. 'His courage and generosity are made manifest in the work' Toni Morrison 'The writer in whose company the prison walls fell down' Nelson Mandela 'A great book, that bespeaks a great, brave, kind, human spirit' John Updike With an Introduction by Biyi Bandele

Horizon

Horizon
Author: Barry Lopez
Pages: 592
ISBN: 9780735277465
Available:
Release: 2019-03-19
Editor: Random House Canada
Language: en

Explanation of the Book:

From the National Book Award-winning writer, humanitarian, environmentalist and author of the now-classic Arctic Dreams: a vivid, poetic, capacious work that recollects the travels around the world and the encounters--human, animal, and natural--that have shaped his extraordinary life. Poignantly, powerfully, it also asks "How do we move forward?" Taking us nearly from pole to pole--from modern megacities to some of the most remote regions on the earth--Barry Lopez, hailed by the Los Angeles Times Book Review as "one of our finest writers," gives us his most far-ranging yet personal work to date, in a book that moves through decades of his life as it describes his travels to six regions of the world: from the Oregon coast where he lives to the northernmost reaches of Canada; to the Galapagos; to the Kenyan desert; to Botany Bay in Australia; and in the resounding last section of this magisterial book, unforgettably to the ice shelves of Antarctica. As he revisits his growing up and these myriad travels, Lopez also probes the long history of humanity's quests and explorations, including the prehistoric peoples who trekked across Skraeling Island in northern Canada; the colonialists who plundered Central Africa; an Enlightenment-era Englishman who sailed the Pacific and a Native American emissary who arrived in Japan before it opened to the West. He confronts today's ecotourism in the tropics and visits the haunting remnants of a French colonial prison on Île du Diable in French Guiana. Through these journeys, and friendships forged along the way with scientists, archeologists, artists and local residents, Lopez searches for meaning and purpose in a broken world. With tenderness and intimacy, Horizon evokes the stillness and the silence of the hottest, the coldest and the most desolate places on the globe. It speaks with beauty and urgency to the invisible ties that unite us; voices concern and frustration alongside humanity and hope; and looks forward to our shared future as much as it looks back at a single life. Revelatory, powerful, profound, this is an epic work of nonfiction that makes you see the world differently: a crowning achievement by one of our most humane voices--one needed now more than ever.